The Suppressed History of the Administration of John Adams: From 1797 to 1801; as Printed and Suppressed in 1802

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Published for the editor, 1846 - 392 Seiten
 

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Seite 250 - an act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes, and to preserve peace on the frontiers...
Seite 377 - What can be your reasons?" "Reason first - You are a Virginian, and a Virginian ought to appear at the head of this business. Reason second - I am obnoxious, suspected, and unpopular. You are very much otherwise. Reason third - You can write ten times better than I can." "Well," said Jefferson, "If you are decided, I will do as well as I can.
Seite 121 - States respectively, or to the people," therefore also the same act of Congress passed on the 14th day of July, 1798, and entitled "An act in addition to the act entitled an act for the punishment of certain crimes against the United States...
Seite 251 - An act in addition to the act, entitled an act to prohibit the carrying on the slave trade from the United States to any foreign place or country...
Seite 174 - Hidalgo, and the said article and the thirty-third article of the treaty of Amity, commerce, and navigation...
Seite 97 - ... agriculture, fisheries, arts, and manufactures, are connected with, and depend upon it. In short, commerce has made this country what it is, and it cannot be destroyed or neglected without involving the people in poverty and distress — great numbers are directly and solely supported by navigation — the faith of society is pledged for the preservation of the rights of commercial and seafaring, no less than of the other citizens. Under this view...
Seite 81 - Such attempts ought to be repelled with a decision which shall convince France and the world that we are not a degraded people, humiliated under a colonial spirit of fear and sense of inferiority, fitted to be the miserable instruments of foreign influence, and regardless of national honor, character, and interest.
Seite 233 - No State to have any forces land or naval ; and the militia of all the States to be under the sole and exclusive direction of the United States, the officers of which to be appointed and commissioned by them.
Seite 27 - The third advantage of the government the Fathers were designing was pointed out most elaborately by John Adams in the first volume of his Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America...
Seite 38 - ... be obtained) to lay the facts before the legislature, that they may consider what further measures the honor and interest of the government and its constituents demand; if a resolution to do justice, as far as may depend upon me, at all times, and to all nations, and maintain peace, friendship and benevolence with all the world ; if an unshaken confidence in the honor, spirit, and resources of the American people...

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