An historical, topographical and descriptive account of the weald of Kent

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Seite xviii - A man he was to all the country dear, And passing rich with forty pounds a year; Remote from towns he ran his godly race, Nor e'er had changed, nor wished to change, his place; Unskilful he to fawn, or seek for power, By doctrines fashioned to the varying hour ; Far other aims his heart had learned to prize, More bent to raise the wretched than to rise.
Seite 203 - are commonly of clay, strewed with rushes, under which lies unmolested an ancient collection of beer, grease, fragments, bones, spittle, excrements of dogs and cats, and every thing that is nasty.
Seite xvi - But if we consider the matter more closely, we shall find that this interested diligence of the clergy is what every wise legislator will study to prevent...
Seite xviii - But in his duty prompt at every call, He watched and wept, he prayed and felt for all ; And, as a bird each fond endearment, tries, To tempt its new-fledged offspring to the skies, He tried each art, reproved each dull delay, Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way.
Seite xv - The artisans, finding their profits to rise by the favour of their customers, increase as much as possible their skill and industry; and as matters are not disturbed by any injudicious tampering, the commodity is always sure to be at all times nearly proportioned to the demand.
Seite xvi - ... to bribe their indolence, by assigning stated salaries to their profession, and rendering it superfluous for them to be farther active, than merely to prevent their flock from straying in quest of new pastures. And in this manner ecclesiastical establishments, though commonly they arose at first from religious views, prove in the end advantageous to the political interests of society.
Seite 201 - Pillows, said they, were thought meet only for women in childbed : As for servants, if they had any sheet above them it was well : For seldom had they any under their bodies to keep them from the pricking straws that ran oft through the canvass, and rased their hardened hides.
Seite xviii - Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And e'en his failings leaned to virtue's side ; But in his duty prompt at every call, He watched and wept, he prayed and felt for all...
Seite xv - But there are also some callings which, though useful and even necessary in a state, bring no particular advantage or pleasure to any individual ; and .the supreme power is obliged to alter its conduct with regard to the retainers of those professions. It must give them public encouragement in order to their subsistence, and it must provide against that negligence to which they will naturally be subject, either by annexing...
Seite 198 - YE towers sublime! deserted now and drear! Ye woods ! deep sighing to the hollow blast, The musing wanderer loves to linger near, While History points to all your glories past: And startling from their haunts the timid deer, To trace the walks obscured by matted fern, Which Waller's soothing lyre were wont to hear, But where now clamours the discordant hern!

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