An English Grammar: Methodical, Analytical, and Historical. With a Treatise on the Orthography, Prosody, Inflections and Syntax of the English Tongue, and Numerous Authorities Cited in Order of Historical Development, Band 1

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Seite 258 - Far along, From peak to peak, the rattling crags among Leaps the live thunder! Not from one lone cloud, But every mountain now hath found a tongue, And Jura answers, through her misty shroud, Back to the joyous Alps, who call to her aloud!
Seite 298 - What conscience dictates to be done, Or warns me not to do, This, teach me more than hell to shun, That, more than Heaven pursue. What blessings Thy free bounty gives, Let me not cast away; For God is paid when man receives, T
Seite 253 - She wolde wepe if that she sawe a mous Caught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde.
Seite 261 - In that mansion used to be Free-hearted Hospitality; His great fires up the chimney roared; The stranger feasted at his board; But, like the skeleton at the feast, That warning timepiece never ceased, — "Forever — never! Never — forever!
Seite 318 - Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms. Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
Seite 235 - Considering these are only the Fruits of his leisure Hours, I don't know a prettier Fellow, for no Man alive hath a more engaging Presence of Mind upon the Road. Wat Dreary, alias Brown Will, an irregular Dog, who hath an underhand way of disposing of his Goods.
Seite 277 - And styled of war as well as peace. (So some rats of amphibious nature Are either for the land or water.) But here our authors make a doubt Whether he were more wise or stout.
Seite 228 - Do murderers then preach morality? But how to think of what the living know not, And the dead cannot, or else may not, tell ? — What art thou, O thou great mysterious terror ! The way to thee we know ! disease, famine, Sword, fire, and all thy ever open gates, That day and night stand ready to receive us.
Seite 272 - And hearts of all who walk within thy rays! Sire of the seasons! Monarch of the climes, And those who dwell in them! for near or far, Our inborn spirits have a tint of thee Even as our outward aspects; — thou dost rise, And shine, and set in glory. Fare thee well! I ne'er shall see thee more. As my first glance Of love and wonder was for thee, then take My latest look...
Seite 256 - There through the long, long summer hours, The golden light should lie, And thick young herbs and groups of flowers Stand in their beauty by. The oriole should build and tell His love-tale close beside my cell; The idle butterfly Should rest him there, and there be heard The housewife bee and humming-bird.

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