Letters on the Elementary Principles of Education, Band 1

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168

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Seite 137 - For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I.
Seite 9 - The understanding, like the eye, whilst it makes us see and perceive all other things, takes no notice of itself: And it requires art and pains to set it at a distance, and make it its own object.
Seite 254 - ... the appellation of benevolence,) these actions have been performed in so free and so kind a manner, that, if I was dry, I drank the sweetest draught, and if hungry, I ate the coarse morsel with a double relish.
Seite 15 - When I call to remembrance the unfeigned faith that is in thee, which dwelt first in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice ; and I nm persuaded that in thee also.
Seite 21 - Yet empty of all good, wherein consists Woman's domestic honour and chief praise ; Bred only and completed to the taste Of lustful appetence, to sing, to dance, To dress, and troll the tongue, and roll the eye...
Seite 161 - Unargued I obey : so God ordains; God is thy law, thou mine: to know no more Is woman's happiest knowledge and her praise.
Seite 253 - I never addressed myself in the language of decency and friendship to a woman, whether civilized or savage, without receiving a decent and friendly answer. With man it has often been otherwise. In wandering over the barren plains of inhospitable Denmark, through honest Sweden...
Seite 181 - As the strength of the body lies chiefly in being able to endure hardships, so also does that of the mind. And the great principle and foundation of all virtue and worth is plac'd in this: that a man is able to deny himself his own desires, cross his own inclinations, and purely follow what reason directs as best, tho' the appetite lean the other way.
Seite 248 - WHEN civil dudgeon first grew high, And men fell out they knew not why ; When hard words, jealousies, and fears, Set folks together by the ears...
Seite 198 - When a rich man is fallen, he hath many helpers: he speaketh things not to be spoken, and yet men justify him : the poor man slipped, and yet they rebuked him too; he spake wisely, and could have no place.

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