Halleck's International Law, Or, Rules Regulating the Intercourse of States in Peace and War, Band 2

Cover
Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner, 1893

Im Buch

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

Alliance for war with reservation of allies IO 19 Warlike associates II
11
No declaration necessary against enemys associates
12
When offence is completed
13
Where no probability of an exchange
18
Acceptance of a license from enemy
19
Rule of reciprocity
24
Documents required to prove neutral character
25
If condemned in captors country
26
Probable cause of seizure usually sufficient
29
When captors are liable for costs and damages
30
Of owners of privateers
31
Duties of prize master 386 388 390 391
32
App The Convention of Geneva 1864
36
App Liebers instructions for armies of the United States
42
CHAPTER XX
58
395
70
PARA PAGE 20 Captures in war
74
All booty belongs primarily to the State
75
Laying waste a country
76
The Admirals Court
78
CHAPTER XXII
80
Attempts to modify it
81
Difficulties in its application
82
Ownership at time of capture
83
Rule as to consignee
84
Doctrine in the United States courts
85
Contract and shipment made in contemplation of war
86
Contract made in peace and shipment in war
87
Shipment at risk of neutral consignee
88
If neutral consignor become an enemy during voyage
89
Acceptance in transitu by neutral consignee
90
National character of goods
91
Transfer of enemys ships to neutrals
93
Rules of such transfer
94
General rule as to character of ships and goods
96
Effect of liens
97
Documentary proofs of ownership
98
Laws of different States
102
Decisions of French prize courts
103
Vessels of discovery
105
Fishingboats
106
Cases of shipwreck
107
Distinctions between reprisals and privateering
108
397
112
Privateers not used in recent wars II2 27 Declaration of the Conference of Paris 1856
117
Opinion of other States
119
Treaty stipulations
122
CHAPTER XXIII
124
CHAPTER XXIV
141
CHAPTER XXV
182
Penalty for breach of blockade
208
Contraband of War PARA PAGE I Definition of contraband
214
Contraband articles confiscated
215
Ancient rule in regard to ships
216
Plea of ignorance or force
217
Return voyage
220
IO Transfer from one port to another
221
Disagreement as to what particular articles are contraband
222
Of modern writers
223
Discordancy of earlier treaties and ordinances
225
Of those of more recent date
227
Decisions of prize courts
230
Munitions of war
231
Intended use deduced from destination
233
Provisions
234
Ancient rule of preemption
235
Contested by others
236
CHAPTER XXVII
239
Claim of England to visit in time of peace
240
Claim denied by the United States
241
Views of the United States sustained by American publicists
243
By Continental writers
244
Of Lord Stowell
245
Distinction beween pirates and slavers
246
Final settlement of British claims with regard to the slave trade
248
Visit and search in time of war
255
App Conference of Brussels 1874
319
20
327
I
335
2
343
PARA PAGE 14 Quality and quantity of goods
353
License to an alien enemy
354
If cargo be injured
355
Duration of offence
356
Intended ulterior destination
357
Capture before and after deviation
358
A license has no retrospective action
360
Breach of blockade c by a licensed vessel
361
CHAPTER XXXI
362
What constitutes a maritime character
363
The Naval Prize Act 1864
365
Title when changed
366
Where prizes must be taken
367
Of joint captures generally
371
10
373
Vessels associated in same service
374
Convoying ships
375
Joint captures by land and sea forces
376
By public ships of allies
377
Captures by revenue cutters
378
By tenders
379
Public vessels of war and privateers
380
Effect of fraud on claims for joint capture
381
Distribution of prize to joint captors
382
Collusive captures
383
Forfeiture of claims to prize
384
Exceptions to rule 125
393
Explanation of them
396
App Proceedings in British prize courts App Practice in prize courts App Additional note on the same subject
399
400
400
401
401
22
409
2
425
CHAPTER XXXIII
432
General exceptions to rule of exemption
442
Effect of military occupation under the law of England 8 Under the constitution of the United States
443
to foreign States
445
In regard to States of the Union
446
Collection and use of revenues in such territory
447
Military contributions
448
Laws relating to such transfers 448 13 Laws relating to such transfers 14 Allegiance of inhabitants of occupied territory
450
Implied obligations of the conquered
451
Of the conqueror
452
Military insurrection
454
General rights as to enemys person
455
Alienations made in anticipation of conquest
456
Private grants so made
458
Effect of military occupation on incorporeal rights
460
Debts due to the displaced government
461
If former government be restored
462
Examples from ancient history
463
22
467
Its application to foreign residents
477
Rule may be varied by treaty or municipal law
478
202
479
English law on this subject
480
Laws of the conquered territory
481
Conquered territory under British laws
482
Under the United States
483
Laws of conquered territory and the constitution of the new State
485
How far laws of military occupation continue after complete conquest
487
To the laws of the new sovereignty
488
Distinction in English law between conquered and dis covered territory
489
II
504
12
510
APPENDIX
529
Earliest age at which marriage can be solemnised in each of
556
The Foreign Marriage Act 1892
569
INDEX
579
432
580
444
587

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 168 - State : or (3.) Equips any ship with intent or knowledge, or having 'reasonable cause to believe that the same shall or will be employed in the military or naval service of any foreign State at war with any friendly State...
Seite 116 - Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Seite 319 - I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit : Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate, one copy to be given to an officer...
Seite 178 - No ship of war or privateer of either belligerent shall hereafter be permitted, while in any port, roadstead or waters subject to the territorial jurisdiction of her majesty, to take in any supplies, except provisions and such other things as may be requisite for the subsistence of her crew, and except so much coal only as may be sufficient to carry such vessel to the nearest port of her own country, or to some nearer destination...
Seite 39 - Military necessity, as understood by modern civilized nations, consists in the necessity of those measures which are indispensable for securing the ends of the war, and which are lawful according to the modern law and usages of war.
Seite 168 - Builds, or agrees to build or causes to be built, any ship with intent or knowledge, or having reasonable cause to believe that the same shall or will be employed in the military or naval service of any foreign State at war with any friendly State...
Seite 168 - ... 1. Any person who, being a British subject, within or without the dominions of her Majesty, has, without the license of Her Majesty, accepted or agreed to accept any commission or engagement in the military or naval service of any foreign state at war with any friendly state.
Seite 166 - Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That if any person shall, within the territory or jurisdiction of the United States, enlist or enter himself, or hire or retain another person to enlist or enter himself, or to go beyond the limits or jurisdiction of the United States...
Seite 273 - ... not only the simplest and best, but the only, rule which can be adopted and observed, consistently with the rights and honor of the United States and the security of their citizens. That rule announces, therefore, what will hereafter be the principle maintained by their government In every regularly documented American merchant- vessel, the crew who navigate it will find their protection in the flag which is over them.
Seite 410 - ... to administer with indifference that justice which the law of nations holds out, without distinction, to independent states, some happening to be neutral and some to be belligerent. The seat of judicial. authority is, indeed, locally here, in the belligerent country, according to the known law and practice of nations ; but 'the law itself has no locality.

Bibliografische Informationen