The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus

Cover
J. Murray, 1830 - 357 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

I
1
II
7
III
14
IV
20
V
27
VI
32
VII
37
VIII
45
XXIV
171
XXV
177
XXVI
190
XXVII
197
XXVIII
204
XXIX
214
XXX
221
XXXI
234

IX
53
X
60
XI
73
XII
87
XIII
99
XIV
107
XV
114
XVI
120
XVII
128
XVIII
134
XIX
142
XX
149
XXI
154
XXII
161
XXIII
165
XXXII
245
XXXIII
253
XXXIV
260
XXXV
266
XXXVI
274
XXXVII
278
XXXVIII
288
XXXIX
296
XL
303
XLI
310
XLII
317
XLIII
323
XLIV
329
XLV
337
XLVI
348

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 70 - ... or vesper hymn to the Virgin, he made an impressive address to his crew. He pointed out the goodness of God in thus conducting them by soft and favoring breezes across a tranquil ocean, cheering their hopes continually with fresh signs, increasing as their fears augmented, and thus leading and guiding them to a promised land. He now reminded them of the orders he had given on...
Seite 118 - A shallow courtier present, impatient of the honours paid to Columbus, and meanly jealous of him as a foreigner, abruptly asked him whether he thought that, in case he had not discovered the Indies, there were not other men in Spain, who would have been capable of the enterprise? To this Columbus made no immediate reply, but, taking an egg, invited the company to make it stand on one end. Every one attempted it...
Seite 71 - Triana ; but the reward was afterwards adjudged to the admiral, for having previously perceived the light. The land was now clearly seen about two leagues distant ; whereupon they took in sail and lay to, waiting impatiently for the dawn. < The thoughts and feelings of Columbus in this little space of time must have been tumultuous and intense. At length, in spite of every difficulty and danger, he had accomplished his object.
Seite 353 - With all the visionary fervor of his imagination, its fondest dreams fell short of the reality. He died in ignorance of the real grandeur of his discovery. Until his last breath he entertained the idea that he had merely opened a new way to the old resorts of opulent commerce, and had discovered some of the wild regions of the east. He supposed Hispaniola to be the ancient Ophir which had been visited by the ships of Solomon, and that Cuba and Terra Firma were but remote parts of Asia. What visions...
Seite 10 - Throughout his life he was noted for strict attention to the offices of religion, observing rigorously the fasts and ceremonies of the church; nor did his piety consist in mere forms, but partook of that lofty and solemn enthusiasm with which his whole character was strongly tinctured.
Seite 74 - Finding, however, that there was no attempt to pursue nor molest them, they gradually recovered from their terror, and approached the Spaniards with great awe; frequently prostrating themselves on the earth, and making signs of adoration.
Seite 74 - On landing he threw himself on his knees, kissed the earth, and returned thanks to God with tears of joy. His example was followed by the rest, whose hearts indeed overflowed with the same feelings of gratitude.
Seite 70 - The breeze had been fresh all day, with more sea than usual, and they had made great progress. At sunset they had stood again to the west, and were ploughing the waves at a rapid rate, the Pinta keeping the lead from her superior sailing.
Seite 72 - ... to give to all remote and unknown regions ? Had he come upon some wild island far in the Indian Sea ? or was this the famed Cipango itself, the object of his golden fancies ? A thousand speculations of the kind must have swarmed upon him, as, with his anxious crews, he waited...
Seite 118 - A Castilla ya Leon, Nuevo mundo dio Colon. (To Castile and Leon Columbus gave a new world...

Bibliografische Informationen