The Art of Poetry: The Poetical Treatises of Horace, Vida, and Boileau

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Albert Stanburrough Cook
Ginn, 1892 - 303 Seiten
 

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Seite 260 - Others for Language all their care express, And value books, as women men, for dress: Their praise is still, — The style is excellent; The sense, they humbly take upon content. Words are like leaves; and where they most abound, Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.
Seite 243 - First follow Nature, and your judgment frame By her just standard, which is still the same: Unerring Nature, still divinely bright, One clear, unchang'd, and universal light, Life, force, and beauty, must to all impart, At once the source, and end, and test of Art. Art from that fund each just supply provides, Works without show, and without pomp presides: In some fair body thus th...
Seite 245 - In every work regard the writer's End, Since none can compass more than they intend ; And if the means be just, the conduct true, Applause, in spight of trivial faults, is due. As men of breeding, sometimes men of wit, T...
Seite 1 - HUMANO capiti cervicem pictor equinam Jungere si velit, et varias inducere plumas Undique collatis membris, ut turpiter atrum Desinat in piscem mulier formosa superne, Spectatum admissi risum teneatis, amici...
Seite 283 - Some beauties yet no precepts can declare, For there's a happiness as well as care. Music resembles poetry; in each Are nameless graces which no methods teach, And which a master-hand alone can reach. If, where the rules not far enough extend (Since rules were made but to promote their end), Some lucky Licence answer to the full Th' intent propos'd, that licence is a rule.
Seite 251 - Who haunt Parnassus but to please their ear, Not mend their minds; as some to church repair, Not for the doctrine, but the music there. These equal syllables alone require, Tho...
Seite 252 - the cooling western breeze," In the next line, it "whispers through the trees:" If crystal streams "with pleasing murmurs creep...
Seite 225 - Tis not a lip, or eye, we beauty call, But the joint force and full result of all. Thus when we view some well-proportion'd dome, (The world's just wonder, and ev'n thine, O Rome!) No single parts unequally surprise, All comes united to th' admiring eyes; No monstrous height, or breadth or length appear; The whole at once is bold and regular.
Seite 239 - Be Homer's works your study and delight; Read them by day, and meditate by night ; Thence form your judgment, thence your maxims bring, And trace the Muses upward to their spring.
Seite 164 - Enfin Malherbe vint, et, le premier en France, Fit sentir dans les vers une juste cadence. D'un mot mis en sa place enseigna le pouvoir. Et réduisit la muse aux règles du devoir.

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