Pelham, Or, Adventures of a Gentleman

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Seite 23 - Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and but for these vile guns He would himself have been a soldier.
Seite 365 - I can give not what men call love, But wilt thou accept not The worship the heart lifts above And the Heavens reject not, The desire of the moth for the star, Of the night for the morrow, The devotion to something afar From the sphere of our sorrow...
Seite 438 - The tree will wither long before it fall ; The hull drives on, though mast and sail be torn ; The roof-tree sinks, but moulders on the hall In massy hoariness ; the...
Seite 10 - Tell arts they have no soundness, But vary by esteeming, Tell schools they want profoundness, And stand too much on seeming. If arts and schools reply, Give arts and schools the lie. Tell faith it's fled the city, Tell how the country erreth, Tell, manhood shakes off pity, Tell, virtue least preferreth.
Seite 71 - tis virtue, for he thinks them knaves: When universal homage Umbra pays, All see 'tis vice, and itch of vulgar praise.
Seite 170 - Every thing in this world, said my father, is big with jest, and has wit in it, and instruction too, — if we can but find it out.
Seite 185 - Who sleeps on brambles till he kills his man, Some frolic drunkard, reeling from a feast, Provokes a broil, and stabs you for a jest. Yet ev'n these heroes, mischievously gay, Lords of the street, and terrors of the way, Flush'd as they are with folly, youth, and wine, Their prudent insults to the poor confine; Afar they mark the flambeau's bright approach, And shun the shining train, and golden coach.
Seite 9 - I have observed that the distinguished trait of people accustomed to good society, is a calm, imperturbable quiet, which pervades all their actions and habits, from the greatest to the least. They eat in quiet, move in quiet, live in quiet, and lose their wife, or even their money, in quiet; while low persons cannot take up either a spoon or an affront without making such an amazing noise about it.
Seite 212 - Glories Of human greatness are but pleasing dreams And shadows soon decaying : on the stage Of my mortality my youth hath acted Some scenes of vanity, drawn out at length By varied pleasures, sweeten'd in the mixture, But tragical in issue...
Seite 310 - Too candid by half," thought I. " This man is certainly a rascal ; but what is that to me ? I shall never see him again ; " and true to my love of never losing an opportunity of ascertaining individual character, I observed that I thought such an acquaintance very valuable, especially if he were in trade ; it was a pity, therefore, for my sake, that my companion had informed me that he followed no calling. " Why, sir," said he, " I am occasionally in employment ; my nominal profession is that of...

Über den Autor (1873)

Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Lord of Lytton, was born on May 25, 1803 in London, England. He entered Trinity College, Cambridge in 1822, won the Chancellor's Gold Medal for English verse in 1825, and received a B.A. degree the following year. He was a novelist, poet, playwright, and politician. He coined the phrases the "pursuit of the almighty dollar", "the pen is mightier than the sword", and the opening line "It was a dark and stormy night". He wrote in a variety of genres, including historical fiction, mystery, romance, the occult, and science fiction. His works included Falkland, Pelham, Eugene Aram, The Last Days of Pompei, Ernest Maltravers, Zanoni, The Last of the Barons, The Caxtons, and A Strange Story. He also published several volumes of poetry including Ismael and The New Timon. His best known play was The Lady of Lyons. He served as the Secretary of State for the Colonies in from 1858 to 1859 and played a large part in the organization of the new colony of British Columbia. He became Baron Lytton of Knebworth in July 1866 and thereafter took his place in the House of Peers. He died on May 23, 1873, just short of his 70th birthday. The cause of death was not clear but it was thought that an infection he had in his ear had affected his brain.

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