The Head of the Family: A Novel

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Harper, 1871 - 528 Seiten
 

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Seite 168 - Work — work — work! It is the iron ploughshare that goes over the field of the heart, rooting up all the pretty grasses, and the beautiful, hurtful weeds that we have taken such pleasure in growing, laying them all under, fair and foul together — making plain, dull-looking arable land for our neighbours to peer at ; until at night-time, down in the deep furrows the angels come and sow.
Seite 246 - The Lord, ye know, is God indeed ; Without our aid he did us make : We are his flock, he doth us feed, And for his sheep he doth us take.
Seite 131 - Though at times her spirit sank ; Shaped her heart with woman's meekness To all duties of her rank : And a gentle consort made he, And her gentle mind was such That she grew a noble lady, And the people loved her much.
Seite 1 - ... of the story, but how every event, adverse or fortunate, tends to strengthen and expand a high mind, and to break the springs of a selfish or even merely weak and self-indulgent nature.
Seite 521 - The only way is to pass through the ocean of affliction solemnly, slowly, with humility and faith — as the Israelites passed through the sea. Then its very waves of misery will divide, and become to us a wall on the right side and on the left, until the gulf narrows and narrows before our eyes, and we land safe on the opposite shore.
Seite 15 - Children," — he frequently called them " children," though not in an overbearing tone, with a sort of loving eldership — " there are a few things I want to talk to you about, or rather for us all to talk over together.
Seite 2 - ... elevated moral tone. No current Novels can be more highly recommended for the family library, while their brilliancy and vivacity will make them welcome to every reader of cultivated taste.
Seite 87 - Take heed ; we are passionate ; our milk of love Doth turn to wormwood, and that's bitter drinking. The fondest are most phrenetic : where the fire Burneth intensest, there the inmate pale Doth dread the broad and beaconing conflagration. If that ye cast us to the winds, the winds Will give us their unruly restless nature ; We whirl and whirl ; and where we settle, Fazio, But he that ruleth the...
Seite 168 - He is one of those who can cut off a right arm, and pluck out a right eye, and so enter maimed into heaven. He is one who can give up dreaming, and go to his daily realities — who can smother down his heart, its love or woe, and take to the hard work of his hand — who defies fate, and if he must die, dies fighting to the last. His bearing under the pangs of unreturned...
Seite 101 - You, yomig, loving creature, who dream of your lover by night and by day— you fancy that he does the same of you? One hour, perhaps, your presence has captivated him, subdued him even to weakness ; the next, he will be in the world, working his way as a man among men, forgetting, for the time being, your very existence. Possibly, if you saw him, his outer self, so hard and stern, so different from the self you know, would strike you with pain. Or else his inner and diviner self, higher than you...

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