Social Organization; a Study of the Larger Mind

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C. Scribner's sons, 1909 - 426 Seiten
 

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Seite 249 - I let it lie, fallow perchance, for a man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.
Seite 179 - Wherefore putting away lying, speak every man truth with his neighbor: for we are members one of another.
Seite 152 - If there be any among those common objects of hatred I do contemn and laugh at, it is that great enemy of reason, virtue, and religion, the multitude; that numerous piece of monstrosity, which taken asunder seem men, and the reasonable creatures of God, but confused together, make but one great beast, and a monstrosity more prodigious than hydra...
Seite 163 - What can we call our own except energy, strength, and will? If I could give an account of all that I owe to great predecessors and contemporaries, there would be but a small balance in my favour.
Seite 142 - It is quite plain that your government will never be able to restrain a distressed and discontented majority. For with you the majority is the government and has the rich, who are always a minority, absolutely at its mercy.
Seite 249 - Provide neither gold, nor silver, nor brass in your purses, nor scrip for your journey; neither two coats, neither shoes, nor y«t staves : for the workman is worthy of his meat.
Seite 192 - I speak the pass-word primeval, I give the sign of democracy, By God! I will accept nothing which all cannot have their counterpart of on the same terms.
Seite 14 - The relative spirit, by its constant dwelling on the more fugitive conditions or circumstances of things, breaking through a thousand rough and brutal classifications, and giving elasticity to inflexible principles, begets an intellectual finesse, of which the ethical result is a delicate and tender justice in the criticism of human life.
Seite 6 - I am, was so certain and of such evidence, that no ground of doubt, however extravagant, could be alleged by the Sceptics capable of shaking it, I concluded that I might, without scruple, accept it as the first principle of the Philosophy of which I was in search.
Seite 69 - is a vehicle, a boat floating down from the past, laden with the thought of men we never saw; and in coming to understand it we enter not only into the minds of our contemporaries, but into the general mind of humanity continuous through time.

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