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Dist.

Dist. VIRGINIA. 14. Charles W. Pitman, 1. John S. Millson,

15. Henry Nes,

16. James X. MeLanahan, 2. Richard K. Meade,

17. Samuel Calvin, 3. Thomas H. Averett, 4. Thomas S. Bocock,

18. Andrew Jackson Ogle,

19. Job Mann, 5. Paulus Powell,

20. Robert R. Reed, 6. James A. Seddon, 7. Thomas H. Bayly,

21. Moses Hampton, 8. Alexander R. Holladay, 22. JOHN W. Howe, 9. Jeremiah Morton,

23. James Thompson, 10. Richard Parker,

24. Alfred Gilmore, 11, James McDowell,

Ohio. 12. H. A. Edmondson, 1. David T. Disney, 13. Fayette M'Mullin, 2. Lewis D. Campbell, 14. James M. A. Beale,

3. Robert C, Schenck, 15. Thomas S. Haymond, 4. Moses B. Corwin, NEW YORK. 5. Emery

D. Porter,

6. Amos E. Wood, 1. John A. King, 2. David A. Bokee,

7. Jonathan D. Morris,

8. John L. Taylor, 3. Jonas Phillips Phænir,

9. Edson B. Olds, 4. Walter Underhill,

10. Charles Sweetzer, 5. George Briggs,

11. John K. Miller, 6. James Brooks,

12. Samuel F. Vinton, 7. William Nelson,

13. William A. Whittlesey, 8. Ransom Halloway,

14. Nathan Evans, 9. Thomas McKissock,

15. Wm. F. Hunter, 10. Herman D. Gould,

16. Moses Hoagland 11. Peter H. Silvester, 12. Gideon 0. Reynolds,

17. Joseph Cable,

18. David K. Carter, 13. John L. Schoolcraft,

19. John Crowell, 14. George R. Andrews,

20. Joshua R. GIDDINGS, 15. John R. Thurman,

21. Joseph M. Root. 16. Hugh White,

TENNESSEE. 17. Henry P. Alerander,

1. Andrew Johnson, 18. PRESTON KING,

2. Albert G. Watson, 19. Charles E. Clarke, Orsemus B. Matteson,

3. Josiah M. Anderson, 20. Hiram Walden,

4. John H. Savage, 21.

5. George W. Jones, 22. Henry Bennett, William Duer,

6. James H, Thomas, 23.

7. Meredith P, Gentry, 24. Daniel Gott,

8. Andrew Ewing, 25. Harman S. Conger,

9. Isham G. Harris, 26. William T. Jackson,

10. Frederic P. Stanton, 27. William A. Sackett, 28. Ab. M. Schermerhorn,

11. Christopher H. Williams, 29. Robert L. Rose,

VERMONT. 30. David Rumsey,

1. William Henry, 31. Elijah Risley,

2, William Hebard, 32. Elbridge G. Spalding,

3. James Meacham, 33. Harvey Putnam,

4. Lucius B. Peck. 34. Lorenzo Burrows.

New HAMPSHIRE. PENNSYLVANIA. 1. Amos Tuck, 1. Lewis C. Levin, (Native.) 2. Charles H. Peaslee, 2. Joseph R. Chandler,

3. James Wilson, 3. Henry D. Moore, 4. Harry Hibbard, 4. John Robins, jr.

North CAROLINA. 5. John Freedley,

1. Thomas L. Clingman, 6. Thomas Ross,

2. Joseph P. Caldwell, 7. Jesse C. Dickey,

3. Edmund Deberry, 8. Thaddeus Stevens, 4. Augustus H, Sheppard, 9. William Strong,

5. Abraham W. Venable, 10. Milo M. Dimmick,

6. William S. Ashe, 11. Chester Butler,

7. John R. J. Daniel, 12. David WILMOT,

8. Edward Stanly, 13. Joseph Casey,

9, David Outlaw,

SENATE. The Senate organized on Monday, the 3d of December, conformably to the Constitution of the United States. There being a quorum, it was resolved that the House of Representatives be informed that they were ready to proceed to business. On the 6th, a resolution was adopted, authorizing the Vice President, in consequence of an affection of his eyes, to employ a clerk who might assist him in his correspondence. It was stated by Mr. MANGUM, that it was the practice, during the Vice Presidency of Col. Johnson, to allow a Secretary to the President of the Senate. There being no organization of the House of Representatives, the Senate merely met and adjourned, from day to day, without transacting any business of an important character, until

Saturday Dec. 15. Mr. BERRIEN after a few introductory remarks offered the following resolution :

Resolved, That a Committee to consist of three Senators, be appointed to wait on the President of the United States, to notify him that the Senate is now organized and ready to receive any communication which he may think proper to make to them, in relation to matters which are within the sphere of their separate constitutional action.

Mr. Clay said, that in resuming the seat which he occupied in that body, it had been his desire to take the lead on no subject and of no party, but to perform in the best manner he could the duties of his position. When the same state of things existed a few years ago in the House, the Senate proceeded in the discharge of its executive duties. The only difficulty which had occurred to his mind, related to the deference and respect due to the other House. The Senate occupies two relations to the House of Representatives—both a legislative and a judicial one-it has also a relation to the executive department of the government. Although we might not be able to cooperate with the House, we could, nevertheless, perform our duties as a component part of the Executive of the country. He could perceive no reason why any member of the other House could take umbrage for proceeding with business of this nature, and he did not think any one would doubt the propriety of the course which the Senator of Georgia had seen fit to adopt.

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By unanimous consent, the resolution was Objection being made by Messrs. Hale and adopted. The Vice President appointed CHASE to the election of the following ComMessrs. BERRIEN, Mason, and Felch to form mittees, by motion, they were filled by ballot the Committee. After an absence of thirty as follows:--minutes the Committee returned and reported Judiciary---Messrs. Downs, Berrien, Bradthat it had performed its duty, and that the bury and Dayton. President had stated that he would communi- District of Columbia---Messrs. Yulee, Milcate to the Senate on Monday.

ler, Shields and Berrien. Mr. DICKINSON gave notice that on Mon- Territories---Messrs. Butler, Underwood, day next he would move that the Senate pro- Houston and Cooper. ceed to the election of the Standing Commit- On motion of Mr. MANGUM, the Senate protees of that body.

ceeded to Executive business, and subsequently On Tuesday, the 18th of December, on adjourned. motion of Mr. MANGUM, the Senate proceeded to fill the Standing Committees. No objection being made, the following named gentlemen

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. were elected to fill the respective Committees, viva voce :

As a preliminary proceeding to the business Foreign Relations.—Messrs. Foote, Web of the session, the two great political divisions ster, Benton, and Mangum.

of the Members of the House of RepresentaFinance--Messrs. Hunter, Phelps, Doug- tives respectively met in Caucus, on Saturday lass, and Pearce.

evening, the 1st of December, to select persons Commerce-Messrs. Soule, Davis of Mass., whom each party would sustain for the SpeakDodge of Wis., and Bell.

ership. The Democrats, by a majority of Manufactures-Messrs. Butler, Clark, Jones votes, agreed upon HOWELL COBB, of Georgia. and Upham.

The Whigs, unfortunately, were disturbed by Agriculture-Messrs. Turney, Spruance, the following Resolution, which was offered Walker and Corwin.

by Mr. Toombs, of Georgia :Military Affairs—Borland, Green, Shields Resolved, That we will discountenance and and Dawson.

oppose all legislation by Congress on the subMilitiaMessrs. Dodge of Wis., Morton, ject of slavery in the Territories or in the DisClement and Spruance.

trict of Columbia. Naval Affairs--Messrs. Mason, Badger,

The resolution was chiefly opposed by Bright and Miller.

Whigs of the South, and it was finally laid Public Lands—Messrs. Borland, Under- over, to avoid all pretext for a rupture. Six wood, Shields and Smith.

Southern members thereupon retired, and took Private Land Claims-Messrs. Whitcomb, no further part in the proceedings. The seDavis of Mass., Clemens, and Badger of ceders were Messrs. TOOMBS, STEPHENS, and North Carolina.

Owen, of Georgia; Mr. Cabell, of Florida, Indian Affairs Messrs. Sebastian, Bell, and Mr. HILLIARD, of Alabama. The caucus Rush and Wales.

then nominated Mr. WINTHROP, of MassaClaims--Messrs. Whitcomb, Underwood, chusetts. Stewart and Baldwin.

Monday Dec. 3. At 12 o'clock, Thomas Revolutionary. ClaimsMessrs. Norris, J. Campbell, the Clerk of the last House callUpham, Dodge of Iowa, and Cooper. ed to order, and proceeded to read from an inPost Office-Messrs. Upham and Soule. formal list the names of the members elect.

Roads and Canals—Messrs. Atchison, All except seven answered. Greene, Foote and Spruance.

Mr. Lynn Boyd, of Kentucky, moved that Pensions---Messrs. Jones, Phelps, Stewart the House now elect, viva voce, a Speaker. and Dayton.

The Clerk appointed Messrs. Duer, of New Patents--- Messrs. Norris, Wales, Whitcomb York, STRONG, of Penn., HILLIARD, of Alaand Dawson.

bama, and MILLER, of Ohio, as Tellers. Retrenchment---Messrs. Houston, Mangum,

The Roll was then called, and each memFelch and Clark.

ber, as named, voted for Speaker, with the Library---Messrs. Mason and Davis of following result: Mississippi.

For HOWELL COBB, of Georgia, (Democrat) Public Buildings---Messrs. Davis of Miss., 103; Robert C. WINTHROP, of Massachuand Clarke.

setts, (Whig) 96; David WILMOT, of PennContingent Expenses---Messrs. Walker and sylvania, (Free Soil) 8; M. P. GENTRY, of Baldwin.

Tennessee, (Southern Whig) 6; and there Enrolled Bills---Mr. Badger.

were six scattering votes. There was no' Engrossed Bills---Messrs. Corwin and Se- choice. A second vote resulted precisely as bastian.

the first. On the third vote Cobb and WILPrinting---Messrs. Hamlin and Smith. Mor each lost one vote, but the general re

and that I could not do so without impairing Mr. STANLY then offered the following rethe best chances of their final success.

solution : I know not how far this opinion may still be Resolved, That the members of the Demoentertained; but an occasion seems now to cratic party be requested to appoint three have arisen when it is due to myself as well members, to confer with three members of the as to others that I should say publicly what I Whig party, relative to the choice of proper have so often said privately on this subject. officers of the House of Representatives. I desire to assure every member of the House This resolution, said Mr. S. had not origithat nothing would give me greater pain than nated with himself, but with a member of the to have my name stand, for an instant, in the opposite party of high character and great way of a satisfactory organization of this body. / experience. He ridiculed the idea that there

The highest interests of the country demand was any danger of the total disorganization of that an organization of some sort should be the government from the present condition of effected, and the personal pretensions of no the House. No person or parties could bring man should be allowed to prevent such a re- it about with Mr. Clay in the other wing of sult.

the Capitol, and Gen. Taylor in the White I am most deeply sensible of the honor House. He desired to give the democrats the which has been done me by my friends during choice of a speaker, but he wished that they the past week. In the record of their devoted should choose a gentleman in all respects satand unwavering support, I shall always find isfactory, and who was known by the whole a subject for the proudest, as well as the most House to be thoroughly competent to a proper grateful, recollection.

discharge of the duties of his position. For And I have only to assure them, in conclu- himself, having received a number of votes, sion, that if it shall now be found consistent he begged to decline the honor, both because with their views and feelings to change their he was too young, and because his temper was candidate, I shall most cheerfully acquiesce too irascible. and co-operate in any nomination which they Mr. Bayly of Virginia, replied at considermay make with better prospects of suc- able length. The present posture of the cess."

House he attributed to the equivocal principles Mr. WINTHROP having concluded his re- of the President on the subject of slavery. It marks---the question was taken on the motion was a state of affairs that he had predicted. to adjourn, and lost. After two or three other The gentleman, said Mr. Bayly, insinuated fruitless motions, the House adjourned at half that something improper had taken place bepast four o'clock.

tween the Democratic party and Free Soilers. Wednesday, Dec. 12. Mr. COBB, of Alabama, He protested against such insinuations being made a personal explanation, in which he lightly made. He flattered himself that the thought it necessary to defend himself from a gentlemen on his side of the house would be charge made in the Union that he was a dis- as little likely as any others to enter into an organizer.

arrangement with the party referred to. But Mr. Wilmot, of Pennsylvania, rose and the gentleman had enabled him to brand the thanked those who had so long sustained him. rumor as it deserves. It was hardly necessary Both of the candidates of the two prominent for him to say that it had no foundation in parties having been withdrawn, he thought truth. The object for which he and those who had Mr. Ashmun interrupted him to inquire if a acted with him contended, had, in a great correspondence had not taken place between measure, been attained, and he therefore de- the member from Indiana (Mr. Brown] and clined being any longer considered as as a some members of the Free-Soil party, in which candidate. He trusted his friends would now he has pledged himself to constitute certain concentrate their votes on some other gentle- committees in a manner satisfactory to them. man, so that an organization of the House Mr. Bayly knew of no such correspondence. might be effected without longer delay. He inquired if the gentleman had authority for

After this, the House proceeded to vote for saying that such was the case. Mr. ASHMUN the fortieth time. The whole number of votes gave common rumor as his authority. Comcast was 226; necessary to a choice 114. For mon Rumor is a common liar, responded Mr. WILLIAM J. Brown, 112; DUER, 26 ; MORE- Bayly. He appealed to Mr. Brown, who HEAD, 17; STANLY, 18; McGAUGHEY, 13; shook his head. Mr. Bayly then continued Winthrop, 17; T. STEVENS, 2; ROCKWELL, and said he was authorized to say that no 1; OUTLAW, 1; H. Mann, 5; Vinton, 2; such correspondence had taken place. If Boyd, 3; JULIAN, 3, and a few scattering. gentlemen of the free-soil party chose to vote The free soilers, as a distinct party, had now for the democratic candidate, it did not conbroken up, and some voted for Mr. Brown, taminate either him or the party supporting while Howe, Root, and Tuck voted for Mr. him. JULIAN, who was dangerously ill at his home in Mr. Root rose to comment on Mr. STANLY'S Indiana.

resolution. There were others in the House

Mr. Root, of Ohio, did not perceive any Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi could only thing ridiculous in the position of the House, regard the resolution as a reflection upon some but the attitude of the two great parties of the members of the body; and being unmight be so. He spoke of Mr. Morse's propo- willing to vote upon any proposition reflecting sition as a gambling measure, a lottery, in upon the motives or integrity of members, he which there were as many blanks as prizes. moved that the resolution be laid on the table.

MR. WOODWARD, of South Carolina, re- Mr. Schenck replied, and repelled the impelled the idea that two parties, because they putation indicated in the remarks of the last happen to be large, possess the right to dictate speaker. In answer to Mr. VENABLES, he reto individuals how they shall vote. He had ferred to the fact that the mode of voting viva his reasons for voting against the nominee of voce, which had been adopted some ten years the Democratic caucus, and if he could pro- ago, was an innovation upon the old, and, perly give them to the House, he conceived possibly, the more wholesome, principle of that they would be thought by many who voting by ballot. heard him, as satisfactory. He had no candi- The motion to lay on the table was decided date of his own, but was ready to vote for by yeas and nays-yeas 162, nays 62. any one who was unobjectionable. If a time Having voted the thirty-second time, without had arrived when his vote would have decided any decision of the question, Mr. SWEETZER the question, he had been prepared to give it ; rose and offered the following resolution: but he could not give a mere complimentary Whereas, This House having balloted seven vote.

days for Speaker without an election, it is Mr. MORSE replied. Would we sit here, he manifest that, from present indications, no orsaid, and allow a few gentlemen to defeat all ganization can now be hoped for: therefore, attempts at organization, until the public press Resolved, That, the Senate concurring, this should cry shame on the representatives of House stand adjourned until the first day of the people ? Gentlemen had told the House January 1850, at 12 o'clock. that they would remain here and vote for After referring to the history of the previmonths before they would change their position. ous voting, he concluded by saying that the

Mr. Brown, of Mississippi, indulged in a democracy had done their duty, and he was little humor at the expense of the previous unwilling to remain longer in a fruitless effort speakers. He trusted that the question would at organization, and desired to return home to not be further discussed.

his constituents and his afflicted family, and The resolution was then laid on the table. not stay there at the expense of the nation,

Mr. Schenck, of Ohio, moved the follow- until a reasonable time had elapsed, in order ing resolution :

to effect a compromise that might promise an Resolved, That the House do now proceed organization. to the election of Speaker, and that the vote Mr. WENTWORTH made a few remarks and be taken by ballot.

moved that the House proceed to vote for If adopted, this resolution, said Mr. S. Speaker, viva voce. The House then adjournwill effect a great saving of time, inasmuch as ed to the following day they could vote twenty times a day by this Tuesday, Dec. 11. The roll was called for method. He thought it desirable that the the thirty-third time, and the vote for Mr. presiding officer should not know by what WINTHROP was 101; for WILLIAM J. Brown, votes he was placed in the chairma principle of Indiana, 80; for Mr. Wilmot, 5; for Mr. he thought in accordance with the theory of Boyd, 15; for Mr. Gentry, 5; for David T. our government.

DISNEY, of Ohio, 8; for Mr. COBB, 5; and Mr. VENABLES said he could not consent to five scattering vote for the proposition of the gentleman of The last vote this day was the thirty-ninth, Ohio. A vote by ballot for Speaker, if it al- which gave the following result; for Mr. tered the vote at all, must produce the effect WINTHROP, 101; for Mr. Brown, 109; Mr. for one of two reasons, either the disposition

WILMOT, 6;

Mr. MOREHEAD, of Kentucky, of the voter to practice a deception as to his 5; Mr. Boyd, 1; and four scattering votes. vote, or a fear of the responsibility when he A motion being made to adjourn, Mr. Winreturned to his constituents. He had voted THROP addressed the clerk, and asked the many times for the nominee of the democratic unanimous consent of the House to say a few

He preferred a Speaker from a non- words before the motion was put. Leave being slaveholding State. He had pledged himself granted, he proceeded as follows: to his constituents to vote for no Free Soiler " It is well known, Mr. Clerk, to many of my or Abolitionist, and he meant to adhere to his political friends on this floor, that I should pledge, whatever might be the result. A vote long ago have withdrawn my name from this by ballot

may
elect

a Speaker, but it will be at protracted contest if they would have permitthe expense of breaking down a custom found- ted me to do so. I have thus far, however, ed in wisdom and productive of the best con- been constantly advised that I was not at libsequences.

erty to interfere in any way with their action,

caucus.

and that I could not do so without impairing Mr. STANLY then offered the following rethe best chances of their final success.

solution : I know not how far this opinion may still be Resolved, That the members of the Demoentertained; but an occasion seems now to cratic party be requested to appoint three have arisen when it is due to myself as well members, to confer with three members of the as to others that I should say publicly what I Whig party, relative to the choice of proper have so often said privately on this subject. officers of the House of Representatives. I desire to assure every member of the House This resolution, said Mr. S. had not origithat nothing would give me greater pain than nated with himself, but with a member of the to have my name stand, for an instant, in the opposite party of high character and great way of a satisfactory organization of this body: experience. He ridiculed the idea that there

The highest interests of the country demand was any danger of the total disorganization of that an organization of some sort should be the government from the present condition of effected, and the personal pretensions of no the House. No person or parties could bring, man should be allowed to prevent such a re- it about with Mr. Clay in the other wing of sult.

the Capitol, and Gen. Taylor in the White I am most deeply sensible of the honor House. He desired to give the democrats the which has been done me by my friends during choice of a speaker, but he wished that they the past week. In the record of their devoted should choose a gentleman in all respects satand unwavering support, I shall always find isfactory, and who was known by the whole a subject for the proudest, as well as the most House to be thoroughly competent to a proper grateful, recollection.

discharge of the duties of his position. For And I have only to assure them, in conclu- himself, having received a number of votes, sion, that if it shall now be found consistent he begged to decline the honor, both because with their views and feelings to change their he was too young, and because his temper was candidate, I shall most cheerfully acquiesce too irascible. and co-operate in any nomination which they Mr. Bayly of Virginia, replied at considermay make with better prospects of suc- able length. The present posture of the cess."

House he attributed to the equivocal principles Mr. WINTHROP having concluded his re- of the President on the subject of slavery. It marks---the question was taken on the motion was a state of affairs that he had predicted, to adjourn, and lost. After two or three other The gentleman, said Mr. Bayly, insinuated fruitless motions, the House adjourned at half that something improper had taken place bepast four o'clock.

tween the Democratic party and Free Soilers. Wednesday, Dec. 12. Mr. COBB, of Alabama, He protested against such insinuations being made a personal explanation, in which he lightly made. "He flattered himself that the thought it necessary to defend himself from a gentlemen on his side of the house would be charge made in the Union that he was a dis- as little likely as any others to enter into an organizer

arrangement with the party referred to. But Mr. Wilmot, of Pennsylvania, rose and the gentleman had enabled him to brand the thanked those who had so long sustained him. rumor as it deserves. It was hardly necessary Both of the candidates of the two prominent for him to say that it had no foundation in parties having been withdrawn, he thought truth. the object for which he and those who had Mr. Ashmun interrupted him to inquire if a acted with him contended, had, in a great correspondence had not taken place between measure, been attained, and he therefore de- the member from Indiana [Mr. Brown] and clined being any longer considered as as a some members of the Free-Soil party, in which candidate. He trusted his friends would now he has pledged himself to constitute certain concentrate their votes on some other gentle committees in a manner satisfactory to them. man, so that an organization of the House Mr. Bayly knew of no such correspondence. might be effected without longer delay. He inquired if the gentleman had authority for

After this, the House proceeded to vote for saying that such was the case. Mr. Ashmun the fortieth time. The whole number of votes gave common rumor as his authority. Comcast was 226; necessary to a choice 114. For mon Rumor is a common liar, responded Mr. WILLIAM J. Brown, 112; DUER, 26 ; MORE- Bayly. He appealed to Mr. Brown, who HEAD, 17; STANLY, 18; McGAUGHEY, 13; shook his head. Mr. BAYLY then continued WINTHROP, 17; T. Stevens, 2; ROCKWELL, and said he was authorized to say that no 1; Outlaw, 1; H. Mann, '5; Vinton, 2; such correspondence had taken place. If BOYD, 3 ; JULIAN, 3, and a few scattering gentlemen of the free-soil party chose to vote The free sojlers, as a distinct party, had now

for the democratic candidate, did not conbroken up, and some voted for Mr. Brown, taminate either him or the party supporting while Howe, Root, and Tuck voted for Mr. him. Julian, who was dangerously ill at his home in Mr. Root rose to comment on Mr. STANLY'S

resolution. There were others in the House

Indiana.

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