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A MERICAN

WHIG REVIEW.

" TO STAND BY THE CONSTITUTION."

NEW SERIES, VOL. V.-WHOLE VOL. XI.

NEW YORK:

PUBLISHED AT 118 NASSAU STREET.

AP 2 A658

INDEX

A.
Angling (Review, P. P.) 32.
Arctic Regions, Map of, 571.
Aspects of Nature, by Alexander Van Humboldt,

(Review of,) Deserts. Their division into the
Desert proper or Sahara ; the Leanos or plains
on the eastern coast of South America, which
are half the year devoid of vegetation ; the
Steppe, furnishing subsistence throughout the
year for pastoral tribes, and the Copse, or bar-
ren, shrubby wastes of the North of Europe ;
the physiognomy of Plants, as an indication of
those natural features that direct the civilization
of races ; volcanoes, 143.

B.
Bremer, Miss, at Home, 423.
British encroachments and aggressions in Central

America; commercial importance of Bay of
Fonseca ; Island of Tigre ; seizure by the Bri-
tish of the Port of San Juan de Nicaragua ; ef-
fect of relative geographical position of Great
Britain and the United States on Asiatic com-
merce; advantage to the United States of ship
canal by route of Lake Nicaragua ; Buccaneers
originators of English intercourse with these re-
gions; character of the natives; difficulties be-
tween Spain and Great Britain respecting this
territory ; final relinquishment of all claim by
British government; revival of British attempts
on decline of Spanish power; grants from the
Mosquito king to Jamaica traders ; revocation
of grants ; seizure of the port of San Juan by
the British ; war on Nicaragua ; British exhibit
of the Mosquito question ; letter of Lord Palm-

erston ; refutation, 188, 335.
Browning's Poems, (Review,) 388.

tion in regard to slavery and its extension ; sup-
pression of slavery in all territories of the United
States by act of central government; expedien-
cy discussed ; special message and scheme of
President Taylor; advice of the President to
New Mexico to form State government; re-
commends early admission of California ; Boun-
dary question between New Mexico and Texas
to be brought before Supreme Court and settled
on international principles; resolutions offered
by Mr. Clay; power of Congress to legislate for
territories undeniable but inexpedient; proposi-
tion of Mr. Clay respecting boundary and debts
of Texas; abolition of slavery in District of Co-
lumbia ; slave trade in the District; rendition
of fugitive slaves ; slave traffic between the
States; compromise line between slave and free
territory ; such line illusory; slave or white la-
bor cannot be forced where they have not their
proper conditions ; balance of power; dissolu-

tion of the Union ; disastrous consequences, 219.
Cooper, J. Fenimore, Works of (Review by G. W.

P.) 406.
Cuba (Review) “Cuba and the Cubans, by the au-

thor of Letters from Cuba ;" geographical and
commercial importance of Cuba ; revolutions in
that island ; horrible political persecutions; de-
scriptions of plantations, their beauty and luxu-
riance; indolence and luxury of the Cubans;
women of Cuba, their early beauty; religion ;
statistics of education ; importance of Cuba as a
possession to England or to the United States,
512.

D.
Democracy in France, by M. Guizot (Review, by

0.); sources of imperfection of human judgment;
the evil of the times imputed by M. Guizot to its
idolatry of democracy ; government in a demo-
cracy ; radical theories; democracy a govern-
ment of induction, from the experience of num-
bers as recorded by their suffrage ; aristocracy a

C.
Cabriolet by Ik. Marvel, 162.
Clay, Mr., speech of, (Review); policy of the na-

P.
Poe, Edgar A. (Review, G. W. P.) 301.
Poetry-Moss and Rust, (G. M. P.) 640, the Old

Homestead, 529—Shipwreck, a Ballad, by W.
155.

R.

government of syllogism, from the partial expe-
rience of a few; right to government, where
resting-democratic republic; its origin ; essen-
tial elements of society in France, viz: the fa-
mily, property and labor ; political elements of
society in France, viz: the legitimists, the bour-
geoisie, the socialists ; condition of permanent
government: M. Guizot's standard is the empi-
rical example of England, not the inductions of
general history, nor the laws of social science;
moral conditions of social quiet in France, viz:
the family spirit, the political spirit, and the reli-

gious spirit, 1.
Dana, Richard H., poems and prose writings of,

(Review, G. W. P.) 66.
Duel without seconds, a daguerreotype from the

State House of Arkansas, 418.

E.
Everstone, by the author of Anderport records,

77, 168, 269, 369, 497, 603.

F.
Franklin, Sir John, and the Arctic expeditions ;

Scoresby's voyages ; Ross's voyage ; Buchan's
voyage ; voyages of Parry; Lyon's, Clavering's
and Sabine's voyages ; Franklin's second expe-
dition; Ross's second voyage ; Sir John Frank-
lin's last expedition, 572.

J.

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Judge not lest ye be judged,” 300.

K.
King, Hon. Thomas Butler, report on California,

(Review); colonization in America ; increase
and expansion of population; necessity of ex-
tending the geographical limits of the Union ;
peace policy ; expansive power of the republic;
rapid settlement of California ; abstract of Mr.
King's report on that country ; yield of the gold
mines; cost of the California colony to the old
States; advantages and disadvantages; Mr.
Clay's committee of thirteen ; objects of the
committee; States should be admitted to the
Union for other reasons than those given by the
opposing factions, 443.

L.
Lynch Law, uses and abuses of, (P. P.) sum-

Rabelais, Francois, Essay on the life and writings

of,-Humor of different nations ; birth, educa-
tion, and early traits of Rabelais ; account of

his more celebrated works ; Pantagreul, 487.
Read's poems or a caution to critics, 287.
Report of the secretary of the treasury, (J. D. W.)
Receipts and expenditures for the fiscal years end-

ing July 1849 and 1850 ; advantages political
and economical of collecting a revenue of cus-
toms ; system of public debt, its advantages ;
existing national debt ; growing expenses of the
government ; necessity for an efficient and eco-
nomical means of increasing the revenue ; pro-
position of Mr. Meredith ; commerce ; its val-
ue not always in the ratio of its profits; politi-
cal economy, its fallacies ; intercourse of men,
social as well as economical ; comparison of
direct and indirect taxation ; direct taxation un-
favorable to agricultural interest ; England cir-
culates free-trade doctrines in this country to
sustain her manufactures ; all tariffs more or
less protective; heavy duties most protective,
and furnish largest revenue at expense of foreign
capitalists ; eventually their result is a better
market for our cotton and food growers as well

as manufactures, 113.
Republic, stability and growth of the ; coloniza-

tion; instability of European governments,
causes of the ; democracy an established form
of government in America ; reason of its sta-
bility ; the three dimensions of power in a
State, internal solidity, durability, and extent ;
the aim of statesmanship to augment these ;
extension of the State ; colonial systems, that
of America the most effectual ; colonization by
the Greeks; Egyptians, Phænicians, Romans;
Russian, Dutch, Spanish, French and English
colonization ; defects of English colonial pol-
icy ; the thirteen American colonies ; origin of
the Union ; colonial policy of the United States
should be calculated to promote the peaceful
enlargement and confirm the internal strength
of the Empire ; the war faction ; necessity of

adopting a settled policy to avert the evils of
Reviews. – Aspects of Nature, by Alexander Von

Humboldt, 143 ; Browning's Poems, 388; Cu-
ba and the Cubans, 512; Dana's Poems and
Prose writings, 66 ; Michel de Montaigne, 47 ;
Macaulay's History of England, 347; Poe's
Works, 301 ; Read's Poems, 287 ; Sidonia, 400,
Shirley, Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, 230;
Rabelais, 487; Works of J. Fenimore Cooper,
406.

S.
Shipwreck, a Ballad, (by W.,) 155.
Southern Views of Emancipation and the slave

trade. Introductory remarks ; Northern and

war, 556.

mary justice, its occasional necessity-Back-
woodsman-conditions which give rise to Lynch
Law—“Regulators” and “ Moderators"--an-
ecdotes of those associations, 459.

M.
M'lle de la Seigleire, 17--129.
Moss and Rust—Poetry, (G. M. P.) 640.
Montaigne, Michel de, works of—(Review) 47.
Macaulay's history of England, (Review J. B. C.)
347.

0.
The Old Homstead—a poem, 529.

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