Costume in England: A History of Dress from the Earliest Period Till the Close of the Eighteenth Century : To which is Appended an Illustrated Glossary of Terms for All Articles of Use Or Ornament Worn about the Person

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Chapman and Hall, 1846 - 618 Seiten
 

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Seite 309 - ... well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled ; for it was a plain cloth suit which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean, and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar ; his hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side ; his countenance swollen and reddish ; his voice sharp and untunable, and...
Seite 309 - I came one morning into the house well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled, for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor. His linen was plain, and not very clean; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar : his hat was without a hat-band; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side...
Seite 150 - Then was there flowing hair and extravagant dress; and then was invented the fashion of shoes with curved points; then the model for young men was to rival women in delicacy of person, to mince their gait, to walk with loose gesture, and half naked. Enervated and effeminate, they unwillingly remained what nature had made them; the assailers of others' chastity, prodigal of their own.
Seite 309 - I came into the House one morning, well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled ; for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean ; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his...
Seite 392 - Now drest in a cap, now naked in none, Now loose in a mob, now close in a Joan ; Without handkerchief now, and now buried in ruff, Now plain as a Quaker, now all of a puff ; Now a shape in neat stays, now a slattern in jumps, Now high in French heels, now low in your pumps ; Now monst'rous in hoop, now trapish, and walking With your petticoats clung to your heels, like a maulkin ; Like the cock on the tower, that shews you the weather, You are hardly the same for two days together.
Seite 391 - Thus finish'd in taste, while on Chloe you gaze, You may take the dear charmer for life, But never undress her — for, out of her stays You'll find you have lost half your wife...
Seite 579 - While spouts run clattering o'er the roof by fits, And ever and anon with frightful din The leather sounds ; he trembles from within. So when...
Seite 429 - Italian; one the new cut, another the old; one of the bravado fashion, another of the mean fashion; one a gentleman's cut, another the common cut; one cut of the court, another of the country, with infinite the like varieties, which I overpass.
Seite 619 - Costume in England. A HISTORY OF DRESS, from the Earliest Period until the close of the Eighteenth Century ; with a Glossary of Terms for all Articles of Use or Ornament worn about the Person. "By FW FAIRHOLT, FSA With upwards of 600 Engravings, drawn on Wood by the Author.
Seite 440 - The spinsters and the knitters in the sun, And the free maids that weave their thread with bones, Do use to chant it ; it is silly sooth, And dallies with the innocence of love, Like the old age.

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