A history of England from the first invasion by the Romans (to the Revolution in 1688).

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Seite 114 - The Commons now assembled in Parliament, being justly occasioned thereunto concerning sundry liberties, franchises and privileges of Parliament, amongst others here mentioned, do make this Protestation following: that the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Seite 51 - I rather think it was in his face. Much was the hurry and confusion; cloths and napkins were at hand to make all clean. His Majesty then got up and would dance with the Queen of Sheba, but he fell down and humbled himself before her and was carried to an inner chamber and laid on a bed of state, which was not a little defiled with the presents of the Queen which had been bestowed on his garments, such as wine, cream, jelly, beverage, cakes, spices, and other good matters.
Seite 231 - I should never take the pains to keep up this ruinous cottage of mine. It is loaded with such infirmities, that in truth I have no great pleasure to carry it about with me any longer.
Seite 101 - He was the most fearless of death that ever was known ; and the most resolute and confident, yet with reverence and conscience.
Seite 95 - Morice-Dances ; and the setting up of Maypoles, and other sports therewith used : so as the same be had in due and convenient time, without impediment or neglect of divine service. And that women should have leave to carry rushes to the church for the decoring of it, according to their old custom.
Seite 166 - Whosoever shall bring in innovation in religion, or by favour seek to extend or introduce Popery or Arminianism, or other opinions disagreeing from the true and orthodox Church, shall be reputed a capital enemy to this kingdom and the commonwealth.
Seite 158 - The King willeth that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm ; and that the statutes be put in due execution, that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions, contrary to their just rights and liberties, to the preservation whereof he holds himself as well obliged as of his prerogative.
Seite 114 - ... of right ought to have, freedom of speech to propound, treat, reason, and bring to conclusion, the same...
Seite 161 - Who rules the kingdom ? The king. Who rules the king ? The duke. Who rules the duke? The devil.
Seite 51 - Now did appear, in rich dress, Hope, Faith, and Charity : Hope did assay to speak, but wine rendered her endeavours so feeble that she withdrew, and hoped the King would excuse her brevity : Faith was then all alone, for I am certain she was not...

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