The House of Bondage

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Cosimo, Inc., 30.06.2005 - 184 Seiten
None but those who resided in the South during the time of slavery can realize the terrible punishments that were visited upon the slaves. Virtue and self-respect were denied them.-Octavia Albert in The House of BondageWith a fiery, righteous rage, former slave Octavia Albert set about, after Emancipation, collecting the true stories of those that "terrible institution" affected most. That raw material gave rise to The House of Bondage, a refutation to Uncle Tom's Cabin, and an answer to other works of literature of the period that purported to show the horror of slavery even though their authors had never set foot in the South. First published in 1890, this is an important example of a sadly small genre: 19th-century literature by African-American women.With its straightforward and heartbreaking litany of cruelty at the hands of slaveowners, families forever divided, and the harsh effects of particularly hard labor, this is an unforgettable work that should be read by every American who thinks he knows his nation's history.Teacher and social activist OCTAVIA V. ROGERS ALBERT (1853-c.1890) was born into slavery in Georgia; after Emancipation, she studied at Atlanta University.

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Inhalt

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VII
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VIII
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IX
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XIII
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XIV
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XXI
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Seite 161 - Praise to the Conqueror, praise to the Lord, His word was our arrow, His breath was our sword! Who shall return to tell Egypt the story Of those she sent forth in the hour of her pride ? For the Lord hath looked out from His pillar of glory, And all her brave thousands are dashed in the tide. Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea! Jehovah has triumphed ! His people are free ! Thomas Moore.
Seite xi - Unless the Divine Power has raised you up to be as Athanasius contra mundum, I see not how you can go through your glorious enterprise, in opposing that execrable villainy which is the scandal of religion, of England, and of human nature. Unless God has raised you up for this very thing, you will be worn out by the opposition of men and devils; but if God be for you, who can be against you?
Seite xi - England, and of human nature. Unless God has raised you up for this very thing, you will be worn out by the opposition of men and devils; but if God be for you, who can be against you? Are all of them together stronger than God? Oh, be not weary in well doing. Go on, in the name of God and in the power of His might, till even American slavery, the vilest that ever saw the sun, shall vanish away before it.
Seite 41 - Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble, and he saveth them out of their distresses.
Seite 161 - EXOD. xv. 20. SOUND the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea: Jehovah has triumphed — his people are free! Sing — for the pride of the tyrant is broken: His chariots, his horsemen, all splendid and brave — How vain was their boast; for the Lord hath but spoken, And chariots and horsemen are sunk in the wave.
Seite 44 - All the way my Saviour leads me, Cheers each winding path I tread, Gives me grace for every trial , Feeds me with the living bread. Though my weary steps may falter, And my soul athirst may be , Gushing from the Rock before me, Lo! a spring of joy I see.
Seite 161 - How vain was their boast; for the Lord hath but spoken, And chariots and horsemen are sunk in the wave. Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea: Jehovah has triumphed — his people are free!
Seite 44 - ALL THE WAY MY SAVIOUR LEADS ME All the way my Saviour leads me; What have I to ask beside? Can I doubt His tender mercy , Who through life has been my Guide? Heavenly peace, divinest comfort, Here by faith in Him to dwell! For I know, whate'er befall me, Jesus doeth all things well...
Seite 3 - I had a little baby when my second marster sold me, and my last old marster would make me leave my child before day to go to the cane-field; and he would not allow me to come back till ten o'clock in the morning to nurse my child. When I did go I could hear my poor child crying long before I got to it. And la, me! my poor child would be so hungry when I'd get to it!
Seite 157 - Warner watched with some astonishment as "white and colored people mingled freely, talking and looking at what was of common interest. . . On 'Louisiana Day' in the Exposition the colored citizens," he reported, "took their full share of the parade and the honors. Their societies marched with the others, and the races mingled in the grounds in unconscious equality of privileges.

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