The Life of Henry Bell: The Practical Introducer of the Steam-boat Into Great Britain and Ireland; to which is Added, an Historical Sketch of Steam Navigation

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author, sold, 1844 - 183 Seiten
 

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Seite 71 - The trunk of an elephant that can pick up a pin or rend an oak, is as nothing to it. It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal like wax, before it, — draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin, and forge anchors, — cut steel into ribands, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.
Seite 54 - She had the most terrific appearance from other vessels which were navigating the river when she was making her passage. The first steam-boats, as others yet do, used dry pine-wood for fuel, which sends forth a column of ignited vapour many feet above the flue, and whenever the fire is stirred a galaxy of sparks fly off, and in the night have a very brilliant and beautiful appearance.
Seite 65 - A Description and Draught of a new-invented Machine, for carrying Vessels or Ships out of, or into, any Harbour, Port, or River, against Wind and Tide, or in a calm.
Seite 71 - By his admirable contrivance, it has become a thing stupendous alike for its force and its flexibility, — for the prodigious power which it can exert, and the ease, and precision, and ductility, with which that power can be varied, distributed, and applied. The trunk of an elephant, that can pick up a pin or rend an oak, is as nothing to it.
Seite 115 - The wise and active conquer difficulties, By daring to attempt them. Sloth and folly Shiver and shrink at sight of toil and hazard, And make th
Seite 72 - It has armed the feeble hand of man, in short, with a power to which no limits can be assigned; completed the dominion of mind over the most refractory qualities of matter; and laid a sure foundation for all those future miracles of mechanic power which are to aid and reward the labours of after generations.
Seite 37 - TRIUMPH proud, thro' the loud-sounding surge.' " This invention is spreading fast in the civilized world; and though excluded as yet from Russia, •will, ere long, be extended to that vast empire. A bird hatched on the Hudson will soon people the floods of the Wolga, and cygnets descended from an American swan glide along the surface of the Caspian sea.
Seite 42 - Greenock, to sail by the power of wind, air, and steam, he intends that the vessel shall leave the Broomielaw on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, about mid-day, or at such hour thereafter as may answer from the state of the tide ; and to leave Greenock on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, in the morning, to suit the tide.
Seite 51 - ... and giving to the fickleness of winds and the faithlessness of waves the certainty and steadiness of a highway upon the land?
Seite 71 - We have said that Mr. Watt was the great Improver of the steamengine ; but, in truth, as to all that is admirable in its structure, or vast in its utility, he should rather be described as its Inventor. It was by his inventions that its action was so regulated as to make it capable of being applied to the finest and most delicate manufactures, and its power so increased as to set weight and solidity at defiance. By his admirable...

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