Nooks and Corners of English Life, Past and Present

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Griffith and Farran, 1867 - 371 Seiten
 

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Seite 269 - Labyrinth, whose ruins, together with her Well, being paved with square stones in the bottom, and also her Tower, from which the Labyrinth did run, are yet remaining, being vaults arched and walled with stone and brick, almost inextricably wound within one another, by which, if at any time her lodging were laid about by the Queen, she might easily avoid peril imminent, and, if need be, by secret issues take the air abroad, many furlongs about Woodstock in Oxfordshire.
Seite 334 - I NEVER had any other desire so strong and so like to covetousness, as that one which I have had always, that I might be master at last of a small house and large garden, with very moderate conveniencies joined to them, and there dedicate the remainder of my life only to the culture of them, and study of nature...
Seite 247 - Fuller, speaking of the town of Banbury near a hundred years ago, tells us, it was a place famous for cakes and zeal, which I find by my glass is true to this day, as to the latter part of this description; though I must confess, it is not in the same reputation for cakes that it was in the time of that learned author; and thus of other places.
Seite 286 - The liv'ried army, and the menial lord. With age, with cares, with maladies oppress'd, He seeks the refuge of monastic rest; Grief aids disease, remember'd folly stings, And his last sighs reproach the faith of kings.
Seite 15 - Taught mid thy massy maze their mystic lore: Or Danish chiefs, enrich'd with savage spoil, To victory's idol vast, an unhewn shrine, Rear'd the rude heap, or in thy hallow'd ground Repose the kings of Brutus...
Seite 280 - quoth he, 'if you will have him dead, 1 warrant your Grace, he will be dead within these four days, if he receive no comfort from you shortly and Mistress Anne.
Seite 127 - English gentry were lodged in stately or even in well-sized houses. Generally speaking, their dwellings were almost as inferior to those of their descendants in capacity as they were in convenience. The usual arrangement consisted of an entrance-passage running through the house, with a hall on one side, a parlour beyond, and one or two chambers above, and on the opposite side, a kitchen, pantry, and other offices.
Seite 42 - This year the Romans collected all the treasures that were in Britain, and some they hid in the earth, so that no one has since been able to find them ; and some they carried with them into Gaul.
Seite 322 - I wish I waited now in her presence-chamber, with ease at my food and rest in my bed. I am pushed from the shore of comfort, and know not where the winds and waves of a Court will bear me; I know it bringeth little comfort on earth ; and he is, I reckon, no wise man that looketh this way to heaven.
Seite 30 - All these cities were connected with each other, and with the capital, by the public highways, which, issuing from the Forum of Rome, traversed Italy, pervaded the provinces, and were terminated only by the frontiers of the empire. If we carefully trace the distance from the wall of Antoninus to Rome, and from thence to Jerusalem, it will be found that the great chain of communication, from the north-west to the south-east point of the empire, was drawn out to the length of four thousand and eighty...

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