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Speech of Ms. Wm. Smith 230, ib. Bill to secure suspected Persons.

237 Speech of the Chancellor of the

Mr. Buxton

ib.

Exchequer

264

Sir W. Pulteney 232,234

Indemnity Bill,

Mr. D. Rider

333 Speech of Mr. Role

Mr. Wigley

235 Mr. Wigley

ib.

Mr. Secretary Dundas ib,

Chancellor of the Exche-

Mr. Lloyd

quer

ib.

Lord Hawkesbury 237

ib.

Mr. Ellison

ib.

Income Bill.

Mr. Wigley

438 Speech of the Chancellor of the

Alderman Lufhington 239

Exchequer 266, 268, 269,

Solicitor General

ib.

270, 271, 272

Attorney General

ib.

Mr. Wilherforce

ib.

Lord Hawkesbury 242

Mr. Yorke

ib.

Sir John Anderson ib.

Colonel Wood

ib.

Mr. Robert Thornton

243

Solicitor General

ib.

Sir G. Page Turner

Mr. Hawkins Browne

Wednesday, Dec. 19.

Mr. Tierney

Staff.

Mr. D. Rider

ib.

Speech of Mr. Tierney, 245

Alderman Lufhington 269

Armorial Bearings.

Friday, Dec. 21.

Speech of Mr. Long

Land Tax Redemption Bill.

Suspension of the Habeas Corpus

Speech of Sir John Sinclair 246, 247,

AET.

249 Speech of Mr. Tierney

273, 280

Chancellor of the Exche.

Chancellor of the Exche.

quer

246, 250

quer

Mr. Rider

24.8

Mr. Courtenay

ib. 230

Mc Shaw Lefevre

249 Mr. Secretary Dundas

279

Sir Wm. Geary

ib.

Attorney General

282, 298

The Speaker 250, 251

Mr. Burdon

288

Sir Wm. Pulteney 251

Sir Francis Burdett ib.

Income Bill.

The Speaker

290

Speech of the Chancellor of the

Solicitor General

ib.

Exchequer 251, 252, 255, Mr. Mainwaring 292

256, 259, 260

Mr. Wilberforce

Mr. Wigley 252, 258, 259 Mr. M. A. Taylor

297

Colonel Wood

Alderman Cumbe 298

Alderman Curtis

io.

Mr. Wettern

ib.

Mr. J. H. Browne 255

Voluntary Corpse

Mr. Jones

ib.

Speech of Mr. Sec. Dundas

303

Sir Francis Baring ib.

Mr. Bouverie

ib.

Mr. Tierney ib. 256, 258, 259 Sir Williain Younge

ib.

Alderman Lulington 257

Income Bill.

Mr. Wilberforce

ib.

Speech of Sir Wm. Lemon 304

Sr Win. Pulteney 258, 259 Chancellor of the Exche.

Mr. Tierney

ib.

quer

ib.

Solici!or General

ib.

Mr. Percival

ib.

Mr. Plumer

The Speaker

305

Thursday, Dec. 20.

Volunteer Corpse

Caution to Necefpapers. Speech of Mr. Huskilfun

261

Speech of Mr, Wilberforce

ib.

Mr. Wigley

Treating

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306

358

361

Page

Page

Treating A&.

Speech of the Speaker

355

Speech of Lord Belgrave

307

Mr. Rider

Income Bill.

Mr. Jones

Speech of Mr. Tierney 308, 310, 311, Mr. J. Hawkins Brownc ib.

312, 313, 314

Mr. W. Smith

362

Chancellor of the Exche-

Lord Hawkesbury

367

quer 308, 311, 312, 314, Sir Francis

Baring 370

315, 319

Sir James Pulteney 371

Mr. H. Thornton 309

Mr. Burdon.

ib.

Alderman Combe ib. 313, 315

Mr. H. Thornton 372

Sir F. Baring

310

Mr. Martin

373

Alderman Curtis

ib. Militia Exemption Bill.

Mr.Wilberforce311, 313,319 Speech of Mr. Secretary Dundas 374

Lord Hawkesbury

ib,

Friday, Dec. 28.

Mr. Percival

313

Mr. Banks

ib.

Income Bill.

The Speaker

316 Speech of the Chancellor of the

Sir W. Pulteney

Exchequer.

Mr. Rider

Mr. Dent

ib.

319

Colonel Mitford

ib.

Saturday, Dec. 29. ,

Income Bill.

Wednesday, Dec. 26.

Speech of Mr. Tierney.

377, 378
Suspension of the Habeas Corpus

Chancellor of the Exche-
AB.

quer
Speech of Mr. Courtenay 320, 321, Mr. Jones

ib.
335

Attorney General 324, 335

Monday, Dec. 31.

Mr. Wilberforce

328

Colonel Despard.

Mr. Burdon

332 Speech of Sir Francis Burdett 380

Mr. Canning

334 Newspaper Reports of Debates.

Militia Exemption Bill. Speech of Mr. Tierney

381, 395

Speech of Mr. Yorke

Secretary at War 382

Mr. Burdon

Mr. Wilberforce

391

Mr. Secretary Dundas ib. Ms. Secretary Dundas 394

Thursday, Dec. 27.

Attorney General

Solicitor General

Breacb of Privilege.

Mr. W. Smith

Speech of Mr. Tierney 337, 341,

Income Bill.

349, 350 Speech of Mr. Nicholls 399

Mr. Speaker

339

Mr. Abbott

400

Chancellor of the Exche.

Mr. Tierney

402

quer

341, 349

Mr. Patten

404

Mr. Bankes

343 Sir James Pulteney 405

Solicitor General

344

Mr. Percival

406

Mr. Wilberforce

345, 347,

Mr. W. Smith

ib.

349

Attorney General

ib.

Mr. Secretary Dundas

Chancellor of the Exche-

Mr. Jones

347

quer

407

Master of the Rolls

350

Sir

Gregory Page Turner 408

Mr. W. Smith

ib.
Colonel Mitford

ib.

Income Bill.

Speech of the Chancellor of the

Tuesday, Jan. 1. 1799.

Exchequer 351, 355, 372

Inclofare of Land.

Sir W. Pulteney ib. 355 Speech of Sir W.Dolben

Income

396
397, 398

398

ib.

ib.

ib.

Page

Page Income Bill.

Tuesday, Jan. 22. Speech of Şir Greg. P. Turner 409

His Majesty's Message about Ire.

land.
Sir James Pulteney ib.
Chancellor of the Exche-

Speech of Mr. Secretary Dundas 488

Mr. Sheridan 488, 489 quer

Chancellor of the Exche-
Wednesday, Jan. 2.

quer

ib.

Wednesday, Jan. 23.
Prifon, Gold Bath Fields.
Speech of the Chancellor of the

Speech of Mr. Secretary Dundas 490

Mr. Sheridan
Exchequer
1410

491 Mr. Canning

504 Friday, Jan. 4.

Mr. Jones

521 Mr. Sheridan

522 Prison, Cold Bath Fields.

Chancellor of the Exche-
Speech of Mr. Steele

434
quer

523 Mr. C. Long

ib.
Mr. Sheridan

533

Chancellor of the Exche.
Monday, Jan. 7.

quer

534

Mr. Martin
Notice from the Bank.

585

Mr. Secretary Dundas ib, Speech of the Speaker 435 Appendix.

1

TO THE PUBLICK.

THI

HE high situation to which Great Britain has

been elevated in the eyes of Europe, and it may almost be said, in the consideration of the world, since the last recess of Parliament, in consequence of her brilliant and important victories in different seas, her firm but wife and temperate conduct at home, (where unprovoked Rebellion and unnatural revolt might have justified the full measure of legal vengeance), and the substantial advantage of rising credit, from the rapid increase of the price of her Publick Funds, cannot but fill the mind of every British fubject, capable of reflection, with the honeft warınth of wellfounded exultation, and the rational pride resulting from the consciousness of having risen in the midst of an expensive, critical, and dangerous war, to an unparalleled degree of national glory. To enter into a detail of the particular grounds on which the preceding observation is founded, would be to trifle with the Reader's patience, and to weaken the impreffion of facts too well established in proof to be doubted, and of too much magnitude to be overlooked. The fplendour of Lord Nelson's victory off the Mouth of the Nile has already been echoed from shore to fhore, and its fame by this time has probably reached the distant coasts of the habitable globe. In the Eu. ropean quarter of the world, not only the extraordinary lustre ic has thrown around the character of its hero and his officers, but the extent of the beneficial consequences it is likely to be followed with, in regard to the restoration of general tranquility and repose, has been fully adınitted and received with the highest general gratitude. More remote regions may probably early reap their А

share

share of the advantages it is apparently pregnant with to all mankind, as a check to the inordinate ambition of the Rulers of the French Republic, who having abjured the Deity, and all pretensions to religion, which they have practically followed up by a total disregard of morality, and every notion hitherto held sacred by the civilized world, seem qualified for the degraded Situation of publick executioners, appointed for a time by Providence to hold and exercise the scourge over those nations which, by French intrigues and delusions, they have been able to delude and fasten to the whipping-post of modern republicanism.

With regard to Ireland, and the districts of it in Rebellion, what candid man has had the opportu"nity of observing the progress and termination of the partial revolt, without feeling his breast warmed with a glow of grateful applause to Government, for their judicious conduct throughout the course of so critical and so embarrassing an event.

Well informed of the meditated treasons that were plotting, the King's ministers had to conduct their measures, in defiance of general opinion, which had been artfully turned in favour of those who are now known to have been the most accomplished traitors, and even betrayed into sentiments of sincere compas. fion for the sufferings of large bodies of men, whom eminent characters poffelled of a considerable stake individually in Ireland, having been themselves grossly deluded, had held up to the Publick in the British Parliament, as suffering under the most unmerited and cruel oppression. At first, when the fword of rebellion was unsheathed, and the monster stalked in blood in the face of day, the avenging arm of military force was uplifted to check its career; the spirit, the firmness, and the valour of the combined exertions of the yeomanry of Ireland, with the prowess of the King's troops, effcctually succeeded in filling the Rebels with awe, apprehension, and dismay. A battle or two fought made a sensible impression on

the

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