Easter: An Introductory Reader

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Rudolf Steiner Press, 2007 - 152 Seiten
Rudolf Steiner contributed much to the regeneration of modern culture. In addition to his philosophical teachings, he provided ideas for the development of many practical movements, including Waldorf education, biodynamic agriculture, anthroposophically extended medicine, the Christian Community, as well as ideas for economic renewal, architecture, Goethean science, and the arts.

Steiner's original contribution to human knowledge was based on his ability to conduct spiritual research, the investigation of metaphysical dimensions of existence. With his scientific and philosophical training, he brought a new systematic discipline to the field, allowing for conscious methods and comprehensive results. A natural seer from childhood, he cultivated his spiritual vision to a high degree, enabling him to speak with authority on previously veiled mysteries of life.

In this introductory reader, Barton collects excerpts from Steiner's many talks and writings on Easter. It also features an editorial introduction, afterword, commentary, and notes.

Chapters:

  1. Can we Celebrate Easter?
  2. The Earth and the Cosmos
  3. Rising Sun
  4. Nature and Resurrection
  5. Golgotha, the Central Deed of Evolution
  6. Easter, a Festival for the Future
 

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Inhalt

Abschnitt 1
55
Abschnitt 2
56
Abschnitt 3
71
Abschnitt 4
92
Abschnitt 5
139
Abschnitt 6
143
Abschnitt 7
147
Abschnitt 8
149
Abschnitt 9
151

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Über den Autor (2007)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

Matthew Barton is a translator, editor, teacher, and poet, and taught kindergarten for many years at the Bristol Waldorf School. His first collection of poems was Learning To Row (1999). He has won numerous prizes for his work, including an Arts Council Writer's Award and a Hawthornden Fellowship.

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