The School: An Introduction to the Study of Education

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H. Holt, 1912 - 256 Seiten
 

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Seite 183 - To form habits of social usefulness and serviceableness apart from any direct social need and motive, and apart from any existing social situation, is, to the letter, teaching the child to swim by going through motions outside of the water. The most indispensable condition is left out of account, and the results are correspondingly futile.
Seite 183 - ... to be a fable made expressly for the purpose of typifying the prevailing status of the school, as judged from the standpoint of its ethical relationship to society. The school cannot be a preparation for social life excepting as it reproduces, within itself, the typical conditions of social life. The school at present is engaged largely upon the futile task of Sisyphus. It is...
Seite 160 - The fundamental factors in the educative process are an immature, undeveloped being and certain social aims, meanings, values incarnate in the matured experience of the adult.
Seite 67 - ... is lower in the early teens than at any other age. It is the time when there is the most rapid development of the heart and all the feelings and emotions. Fear, anger, love, pity, jealousy, emulation, ambition, and sympathy are either now born or springing into their most intense life. Now young people are interested in adults, and one of their strong passions is to be treated as if they were mature. They desire to know, do, and be all that becomes a man or woman. Childhood is ending, and plans...
Seite 76 - ... disorders, and cough are somewhat more imminent ; and the blood is more often impoverished. The brain has practically finished for life its growth in weight and size ; and all work and strain must be reduced. Some important corner in its time of development, not yet fully understood, is turned. III. At eight or nine there begins a new period, which, for nearly four years, to the dawn of puberty, constitutes a unique stage of life, marked off by many important differences from the period which...
Seite 77 - ... these four years represented, on the recapitulation theory, a long period in some remote age, well above the simian, but mainly before the historic, period, when our early forebears were well adjusted to their environment. Before a higher and much more modern story was added to human nature, the young in warm climates, where most human traits were evolved, became independent of their parents, and broke away to subsist for themselves at an early age.
Seite 67 - ... the early twenties. The first stage is marked by a great increase in the rate of growth in both height and weight. It is a period of greater susceptibility to sickness for both sexes; but this vulnerability is due to the great changes, and the death-rate is lower in the early teens than at any other age. It is the time when there is the most rapid development of the heart and all the feelings and emotions. Fear, anger, love, pity, jealousy, emulation, ambition, and sympathy are either now born...
Seite 75 - Guinevere, according to the mediaeval legends, suffered abduction from time to time as a matter of course, and equally as a matter of course was rescued by Lancelot. A modern reader can see how the stories rose around "the much-abducted queen." Mediaeval singers found in "King Arthur and his Court...
Seite 66 - And I can manage the original. At five years old — how ill had fared its leaves ! Now, growing double o'er the Stagirite, At least I soil no page with bread and milk, Nor crumple, dogs-ear and deface — boys
Seite 79 - The period just preceding adolescence is, by reason of its stability of adjustment, more suitable than any other stage for methods of a drill character; that is to say, the old-time methods of the schoolmaster result in less harm between the age of nine and twelve than at other times.".

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