An abridgment of the History of England ... revised, corrected, and improved ... Also a continuation ... to the beginning of 1826 by John Dymock: and extended from his continuation to the year 1856, etc

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Cowie, Jolland & Company, 1856 - 382 Seiten

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Seite 204 - I have sought the Lord night and day, that He would rather slay me than put me upon the doing of this work.
Seite 169 - I say, they will receive a terrible blow this parliament, and yet they shall not see who hurts them. This counsel is not to be contemned, because it may do you good, and can do you no harm : for the danger is past, as soon as you have burned the letter. And I hope God will give you the grace to make good use of it, unto whose holy protection I commend you*.
Seite 204 - For shame," said he to the Parliament, "get you gone; give place to honester men, to those who will more faithfully discharge their trust. You are no longer a Parliament : I tell you, you are no longer a Parliament. The Lord has done with you : he has chosen other instruments for carrying on his work.
Seite 129 - ... had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, he would not have given me over in my grey hairs. But this is the just reward that I must receive for my indulgent pains and study, not regarding my service to God, but only to my prince.
Seite 169 - I would advise you, as you tender your life, to devise some excuse to shift off your attendance at this parliament : for God and man have concurred to punish the wickedness of this time. And think not slightly of this advertisement, but retire yourself into your country, where you may expect the event in safety. For though there be no appearance of any stir, yet, I say, they shall receive a terrible blow this parliament, and yet they shall not see who hurts them.
Seite 208 - A tertian ague came kindly at last to deliver him from this life of horror and anxiety. For the space of a week no dangerous symptoms appeared ; and in the intervals of the fits he was able to walk abroad. At length the fever increased, and he became delirious. He was just able to answer yes to the demand, whether his son Richard should be appointed to succeed him.
Seite 197 - There is, sir, but one stage more, which, though turbulent and troublesome, is yet a very short one. Consider, it will soon carry you a great way ; it will carry you from earth to heaven ; and there you shall find, to your great joy, the prize to which you hasten, a crown of glory." " I go," replied the king, " from a corruptible to an incorruptible crown ; where no disturbance can have place.
Seite 196 - At these words, the child looked very steadfastly upon him. "Mark, child! what I say: they will cut off my head! and perhaps make thee a king: but mark what I say: thou must not be a king as long as thy brothers Charles and James are alive. They will cut off thy brothers' heads, when they can catch them! And thy head, too they will cut off at last! Therefore I charge thee, do not be made a king by them!
Seite 228 - However, his name was so popular, and so great was the hatred of the people both at the person and religion of James, that in four days he had assembled a body of above two thousand men.
Seite 231 - Lloyd, bishop of St. Asaph, Ken of Bath and Wells, Turner of Ely, Lake of Chichester, White of Peterborough, and...

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