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AN

ABRIDGEMENT

OF THE

HISTORY OF ENGLAND:

FROM

THE INVASION OF JULIUS CÆSAR TO THE DEATH OF

GEORGE THE SECOND:

BY DR. GOLDSMITH.

REVISED, CORRECTED, AND IMPROVED, WITH EXERCISES AT THE

END OF EACH CHAPTER ;

ALSO A

CONTINUATION OF THE HISTORY TO THE BEGINNING OF 1826.

BY JOHN DYMOCK:

AND

· EXTENDED FROM HIS CONTINUATION TO THE YEAR 1856.

WITH HEADS OF THE SOVEREIGNS,

BY BEWICK.

LONDON:
COWIE, JOLLAND, & Co.; SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, & Co.;
C. H. LAW, HAMILTON, ADAMS, & Co.; T. DEAN & SON;

HOULSTON & STONEMAN; AND SMITH, ELDER, & Co.

1856.

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It scarcely needs to be remarked, that a School-book should be recommended by its accuracy. When children are required to give a detailed account of what they read, it is injudicious to put into their hands, what is either carelessly written, or incorrectly printed. Goldsmith's History of England has passed through many editions, and common impressions are more likely to propagate, than to rectify, errors. A knowledge of this truth, from long experience as a Teacher, suggested the propriety of comparing the copy, intended for the Printer, with the Authors whom Goldsmith had adopted for his guides. Not satisfied with their authority, I examined with care the pages of Henry's History of Great Britain, and other eminent writers, whose narratives either authenticated, or enabled me to correct, the statements of Goldsmith. The labour of perusal I found amply rewarded by the discovery of many errors in dates, numbers, and even in facts. I have occasionally introduced a sentence where the connection was broken, or where the transition was so rapid as to produce obscurity. To interfere as little as possible with the language of Goldsmith, I found it necessary, in some instances, to add an explanatory note at the foot of the page. I have inserted a number of dates, the want of which has been a general subject of complaint with Teachers

Besides these important points, which claimed my particular attention, I have removed certain grammatical errors which pervaded the whole work; as, from whence, from thence, scarce for scarcely, agreeable for agreeably, previous for previ. ously, and others of the same kind. The frequent use of that as a relative pronoun, perplexes the Learner, who often finds it difficult to ascertain its true meaning. I have removed this inaccuracy, by employing who, whose, whom, or which, as the case required. It was sometimes, though very seldom, neces

sary to alter an exceptionable word, and to suppress or change a sentence, when it suggested an idea injurious to mental * delicacy.

It has been my object in writing the Exercises to frame the questions so as to induce the Learner, who does not study under a Teacher, to read them. With this view, I have sometimes inserted a question connected with the one before, to which the text affords no answer. Of such the answer is necessarily given. At other times, supplementary words are added, that the circumstance might be more fully brought before the Reader. In general, the answer may be given in the very words of the History. To scholars of slow Capacity, this is almost indispensible; for change of words perplexes, and seems to suggest a different idea, although the meaning may be precisely the same. To learners of greater ability, the Teacher may put the questions in a variety of forms, and he will find this an exercise very beneficial to his pupils.

Of the continuation of the work from 1760, it is neither my duty nor inclination to say much. If I have executed my own intention, my pages will contain nothing but what is in exact conformity with truth.

In order to give a general idea of the present state of Europe, and of our relations with regard to foreign countries, it was necessary to notice the revolutions in Spain, Portugal, South America, Greece, and France; but I have avoided all detail of circumstances, unless they either did directly bear on the state of our own country, or may ultimately have that effect, or illustrated the spirit of the times, or had some influence in producing the great events which it is the province of history to record.

Although only an abridgment, the reader will find few important events, or measures of parliament, neglected, and throughout it has been my constant study to observe exact chronological order, that the facts here learned may serve as land-marks for arranging the additional information which may be obtained from the perusal of British historians.

J.D.

The publishers were desirous that the history should be continued to the present time, the Editor therefore has added the remaining portion of English history, from the year 1826 to the latest events of the present reign.

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From the Invasion of the Romans, under the command of Julius

Cæsar, in the year 55 B. C. to their Abdication in the year 449 of the Christian era.

D RITAIN was but very little known to the rest of the

D world before it was invaded by Julius Cæsar. The coasts opposite Gaul were frequented by merchants who traded thither for such commodities as the natives were able to produce, and, after a time, possessed themselves of all the maritime places where they had at first been permitted to reside. Finding the country fertile, and commodiously situated for trade, they settled upon the sea-side, and introduced the practice of agriculture. But it was very different with the inland inhabı tants of the country, who considered themselves as the law tui possessors of the soil, and avoided all correspondence with me new-comers, as intruders upon their property.

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