A History of France: From the Conquest of Gaul by Julius Caesar to the Death of Louis Philippe, with Conversations at the End of Each Chapter

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John Murray, 1851 - 615 Seiten
 

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Seite 264 - I'll have her, but I will not keep her long. What ! I, that kill'd her husband and his father, To take her in her heart's...
Seite 26 - O for a blast of that dread horn, On Fontarabian echoes borne, That to King Charles did come, When Rowland brave, and Olivier, And every paladin and peer, On Roncesvalles died...
Seite 481 - ... d'Estaing, took the islands of St. Vincent and Grenada, and had an indecisive engagement with admirals Byron and Barrington. D'Estaing afterwards made an unsuccessful attempt on Savannah in Georgia, which was in the possession of the English, and then, after sailing again into the West Indies, where he left a part of his fleet, proceeded with the remainder to Europe. The chief events of the year 1780 were, that on the...
Seite 537 - em both, and give every one his right, is good friends now. And besides that, your honour gived an order long ago not to take any money from nobody, and we never did take none. And Mr. Leneve, that steered your honour and that there king, says he won't have no hand in it, and so does Andrew Young the proper coxen, and he hopes no offence. — So we all, one and all, begs not to take it at all, so no more from your honor's dutiful servants.
Seite 414 - She was a very active partizan, and interfered with the military as well as with the political affairs of the faction. Mary. Don't you think she must have been the sort of woman one calls a termagant? Mrs. M. Indeed I think so; and there was another very conspicuous lady at that time who also belonged to the class of termagants. This was Mademoiselle de Montpensier. She was daughter of Gaston duke of Orleans, by his first wife the heiress of the duke de Montpensier, and inherited from her mother...
Seite 144 - I did not dare turn my eyes that way, for fear of feeling too great regret, and lest my courage should fail on leaving my two fine children, and my fair castle of Joinville, which I loved to my heart,
Seite 414 - Our laundry is filled by the aged, the blind, the maimed, the halt, and infants. The infirmary is full of sick and wounded. We have torn up all our rags and linen clothing to dress their sores ; we have no more, and are now at our wits
Seite 504 - The king's voice was drowned in the noise of the drums. Three executioners then approached to seize him. At the sight of a cord, with which one of them attempted to tie his arms, the king, for the first time, showed signs of indignation, and seemed to be about to resist, but he recollected himself in a moment and submitted. The executioners laid hold of him, and placed him on the guillotine. The confessor then, kneeling with his face near to that of the king, pronounced aloud, i' Enfant de Saint...
Seite 496 - It is generally supposed that he had not that stamp of high ability which alone could have carried the government in safety through the perils by which it had been of late environed ; but it must be ever doubtful whether, under the circumstances in which France was placed at the time of the convocation of the States-General, the wisdom or virtue of any individual could have averted the fatal consequences which were to follow. A decree was passed on the 27th of November, ejecting from their benefices...
Seite 516 - He might indeed have washed himself, for he had a pitcher of water, and might have kept himself cleaner than he did; but, overwhelmed by the ill treatment he had received, he had not the resolution to do so, and his illness began to deprive him of even the necessary strength. He passed his days without any occupation, and in the evening was allowed no light. His situation affected his mind as well as his body.

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