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ENGLISH LITERATURE FOR JUNIOR CLASSES .

IN FOUR PARTS

EDITED BY

H. COURTHOPE BOWEN, M.A.

HEAD MASTER OF THE GROCERS' COMPANY'S SCHOOLS, HACKNEY DOWNS
AUTHOR OF STUDIES IN ENGLISH ENGLISH GRAMMAR

FOR BEGINNERS' 'LORD CLIVE ETC.

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C. KEGAN PAUL & CO., 1 PATERNOSTER SQUARE

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(The rights of translation and of reproduction are reserved) HOW TO USE THE BOOK.

tion ;

It is not the object of this little book to supply texts which may serve as lessons in Grammar, Philology, or Antiquarianism, or which may be made exercises for the memory. The poems gathered here are meant to be studied for the sake of the thought and imagination they contain, and for the sake of the methods used to express these. The intention is that the pupil shall become familiar with fine thought and beautiful imagination in their many varieties, and shall learn how best to give expression to such things. This has been carefully kept in mind in choosing the pieces. Some have been chosen for their thought, some for their imagina

all for the power and excellence of their expression. To enlarge and ennoble the mind there is no better means than the study of literature. To learn how to speak and write correctly and well, there is but one way—the study of literature. To offer an opportunity for the study of simple English Literature is the object of this book.

As the pupils, who are to study these poems, are expected to be not much over the age of ten, it is manifest that the Notes are of necessity very simple in character, and many of them such as boys of fifteen or sixteen years of age would not require. It is hoped that they may serve to illustrate and explain the poems, and to direct the pupil's attention to all the finer points. It is not intended that the Notes should be an object and end in themselves. They will have failed in their aim if they do not drive the pupil back on the text as the sole subject of his study. Grammar is but slightly touched upon; Philology is only introduced when the meaning of a word is thereby really made clearer and more interesting; while Antiquarianism is never brought

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