The English Journal of Education, Band 10

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Darton and Clark, 1856
 

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Seite 249 - And his droop'd head sinks gradually low — And through his side the last drops, ebbing slow From the red gash, fall heavy, one by one, Like the first of a thunder-shower ; and now The arena swims around him— he is gone, Ere ceased the inhuman shout which hail'd the wretch who won. He heard it, but he heeded not— his eyes Were with his heart, and that was far away...
Seite 398 - If his children forsake my law, and walk not in my judgments ; If they break my statutes, and keep not my commandments ; Then will I visit their transgression with the rod, and their iniquity with stripes. Nevertheless my loving-kindness will I not utterly take from him, nor suffer my faithfulness to fail.
Seite 126 - ... in one city or town, more or less as the place deserveth, but not long; nay, when he stayeth in one city or town, let him change his lodging from one end and part of the town to another, which is a great adamant of acquaintance; let him sequester himself from the company of his countrymen, and diet in such places where there is good company of the nation where he travelleth...
Seite 319 - This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not.
Seite 121 - Yea I believe, that beside her perfect readiness in Latin, Italian, French, and Spanish, she readeth here now at Windsor more Greek every day than some prebendary of this church doth read Latin in a whole week.
Seite 126 - As for the acquaintance which is to be sought in travel, that which is most of all profitable is acquaintance with the secretaries and employed men of ambassadors ; for so in travelling in one country he shall suck the experience of many.
Seite 55 - Fetching mad bounds, bellowing, arid neighing loud, Which is the hot condition of their blood: If they but hear perchance a trumpet sound, Or any air of music touch their ears, You shall perceive them make a mutual stand, Their savage eyes...
Seite 171 - Protinus aeger ago ; hanc etiam vix, Tityre, duco. Hie inter densas corylos modo namque gemellos, Spem gregis, ah ! silice in nuda connixa reliquit.
Seite 54 - The interim of unsweating themselves regularly and convenient rest before meat may both with profit and delight be taken up in recreating and composing their travailed spirits with the solemn and divine harmonies of music, heard or learned...
Seite 443 - TWINKLE, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are ! Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky.

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