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A TABLE TO FIND EASTER DAY, FROM THE PRESENT TIME
TILL THE YEAR 1899 INCLUSIVE, ACCORDING TO

THE FOREGOING CALENDAR.

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OAMUAN MUAR SMUA

XVIII
VII

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THIS Table contains so much of the Calendar as
is necessary for the determining of Easter; To find
which, look for the Golden Number of the year in
the first Column of the Table, against which stands
the Day of the Paschal Full Moon; then look in
the third column for the Sunday Letter, next after
the day of the Full Moon, and the day of the
Month standing against that Sunday Letter is
Easter Day. If the Full Moon happens upon a
Sunday, then (according to the first rule) the next
Sunday after is Easter Day.

To find the Golden Number, or Prime, add one
to the Year of our Lord, and then divide by 19;
the remainder, if any, is the Golden Number; but if
nothing remaineth, then 19 is the Golden Number.

To find the Dominical or Sunday Letter, accord-
ing to the Calendar, until the year 1799
inclusive, add to the Year of our Lord
its fourth part, omitting fractions; and
also the number 1: Divide the sum by
7; and if there is no remainder, then Å
is the Sunday Letter: But if any num.
ber remaineth, then the Letter standing
against that number in the small an-
nexed Table is the Sunday Letter.

For the next Century, that is, from the year 1800
till the year 1899 inclusive, add to the current year
only its fourth part, and then divide by 7, and pro-
ceed as in the last Rule.

NOTE, That in all Bissextile or Leap Years, the Letter found as above will be the Sunday Letter, from the intercalated day exclusive to the end of the year.

O

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DE GAUM

LOCO

XVII
VI

MUAMU

stituted which still retains the name of Vigil. The Vigil is not | deference to Royal Proclamations dated June 21st, 1837, and therefore connected with the Evening Service, but is the day Jan. 17th, 1859. before the Festival to which it belongs, and since (according to the accustomed habit of the Church) the Festival itself begins on the evening previous, the Vigil ends before that Evening service

§ The Table to find Easter till 1899. (if there is more than one) which is observed as the first Vespers This Table is an extract from the first three columns of the of the feast. That, in medieval times, the whole of the day Calendar during the Paschal limits, or the period during which before the Festival was observed as the Vigil may be seen by the Easter Day must always fall. It was substituted in 1752 (with following Rubric for the first Sunday in Advent: “Non dicatur the succeeding one) for “a Table to find Easter for ever” which etiam per totum annum Te Deum laudamus in Vigiliis, nec in had been printed in previous Prayer Books, but which had been quatuor temporibus, nisi in Vigilia Epiphaniæ quando in Dominica framed on a mistaken supposition respecting the perpetual appli, contigerit, et præterquam in quatuor temporibus hebdomadæ cation of the cycle of Golden Numbers to fixed days of the Pentecostes.” The Te Deum was used at Mattins : the use of it months. A change in the application of the cycle will be neceshere referred to must therefore be at the Mattins of the Vigil. sary in the year 1900, (provided for by another Table further Some remarks on the observance of Vigils may be found in on,) when the above will be superseded for all future calculaTracts for the Times, No. 66, pp. 11, 12.

tions.

The Golden Numbers and the Sunday Letters are explained in The accession of the Sovereign was first observed as a “Solemn Day” in the reign of Queen Elizabeth; but no mention of such a These Tables are a solution of a difficulty about the determinaday was made in the Prayer Book until late in the last century. tion of Easter Day, which caused considerable trouble to the The above notice of the day has not therefore the authority of Church when astronomy, and consequently Chronology, was the Sealed Books, nor of the Act of 1752, but is printed in imperfectly understood. The Nicene Council (A.D. 325) endea

the notes to th

teneral Tables for fir

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To make use of the preceding Table, find the Sunday Letter for the Year in the uppermost
Line, and the Golden Number, or Prime, in the Column of Golden Numbers, and against the
Prime, in the same Line under the Sunday Letter, you have the Day of the Month on which
EASTER falleth that year. But Note, that the Name of the Month is set on the Left Hand,
or just with the Figure, and followeth not, as in other Tables, by Descent, but Collateral.

voured to settle this difficulty and the Quartodeciman controversy | this rule was subject to error, and that Easter Day was some(see notes on Easter Day] by the following epistolary decrees : times too early and sometimes too late to commemorate our

1. That the twenty-first day of March is to be taken as the Lord's Resurrection with the accuracy which was intended by vernal equinox.

the Nicene Council. This erroneous system was not corrected, 2. That the full moon happening upon or next after the twenty however, until the introduction of the “New Style” by Pope first day of March is to be taken for the full moon of the month Gregory XIII. in 1582; and the New Style was not introduced into Nisan.

England until 1752, when the Act of Parliament was passed from 3. That the next Lord's Day after that full moon is to be which the present Calendar is printed. observed as Easter Day.

These Tables for finding Easter, together with those which 4. Unless the full moon happens upon a Sunday, when Easter follow, are part of the Act of Parliament referred to [24 Geo. II. Day is to be the next Sunday.

c. 23), and have not received the same authority as the Prayer But to observe these rules it was necessary to ascertain the age Book itself. Nor does there seem to be any practical necessity of the moon : and although this could be done correctly for a for binding them up with every edition of the Prayer Book as is period by means of a cycle of the moon discovered by Meton, an the present custom, since they are of far too recondite a characAthenian philosopher, which set forth the change of the moon ter to be of any use except to highly scientific students; and for nineteen years, and wbich was supposed to repeat itself ad in- for ordinary use the Table of Moveable Feasts is amply sufficient. finitum, yet a more accurate knowledge of astronomy showed that

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Dec. 2

Three
Five
Four
Two

Jan. 28
Feb. 17

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Feb, 14 | Apr.
Mar. 6
Feb. 26

Mar.

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May 20
June 9
May 31

- 16
June 5
May 28

Jan. 24
Feb. 13

- 10

Five

Apr.

Feb.

Jan. 28

- 19

Feb. 9

Apr.

Nov. 30

XIII

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Four
Three
Four
Three
Two
Five
Three
Five
Four
Two
Five
Four
Two
Four

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June 1
May 24

- 16
June 4
May 20
June 9
- 1
May 16
June 5
May 28

No

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1866 V
1867
1868 VII
1869 VIII
1870

IX
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875 XIV
1876 XV
1877 XVI
1878 XVII
1879 XVIII
1880 XIX
1881
1882
1883 III
1884 IV
1885
1886
1887 VII
1888 VIII
1889 IX
1890

X 1891 XI 1892 XI 1893 XIII 1894 1895 XV 1896 XVI 1897 I XVII 1898 XVIII 1899 XIX 1900

Dec.

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18
Jan. 24
Feb. 13 Mar. 1
Jan. 28 Feb. 14
Feb. 17 | Mar. 6
- 9 Feb. 26
Jan. 25

ll
Feb. 13 Mar. 2

5 Feb. 22
Jan. 21
Feb. 10

18
-21 Mar. 10

6 Feb. 23 Jan. 29

- 15
Feb. 17 Mar. 6
- 2 Feb. 19
Jan. 25

11
Feb. 14 Mar
Jan. 29

Twenty-six
Twenty-three
Twenty-four

Twenty-six
Twenty-three
Twenty-five
Twenty-six
Twenty-four
Twenty-five
Twenty-six
Twenty-four

Twenty-six
Twenty-three
Twenty-four

Twenty-six
Twenty-three

Twenty-five
Twenty-seven
Twenty-four
Twenty-five
Twenty-two
Twenty-four

Twenty-six
Twenty-three
Twenty-five
Twenty-six
Twenty-three

Twenty-six
Twenty-seven
Twenty-four
Twenty-five
Twenty-three
Twenty-four
Twenty-six
Twenty-four

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Var

27

Three

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Six
Four

June 1
May 24
June 13
May 29

Three

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Dec

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Feb

Ded

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F | Five

Three

Two
CB Five
A Three

Two
Four
Three

Five
в | Four

Three
Five

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Feb. 10

June 5
May 21

13
June 2
May 24
June 6
May 29
— 21
June 3

Nov 2

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Dec.

Feb. 11

[N.B. This Table is only a representative and not a facsimile of the Table in the Act of Parliament. The latter extends

from 1752 to 1804.]

THE EPACT.

of the present cycle the lunar year and the solar year both comThe difference between the length of the solar year and that ot menced on the 1st of January; the Epact for the second year was the lunar year is eleven days; the solar year being made up of 365 therefore 11, for the third 22, for the fourth 33, and so forth in a days, and the lunar year of twelve months or moons, of twenty- regular succession. The whole months are not reckoned, however, nine and a half days each, or 354 days in all. The last day of and instead of 33, the Epact is taken as 3, instead of 36 as 6, and the lunar year being the last day of the twelfth moon, and the so forth. last day of the solar year being the 31st of December, the A cycle of nineteen Epacts is thus formed which always runs difference between these constitutes the Epact. In the first year parallel to the nineteen Golden Numbers in the following order :

Golden Numbers 1 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19
Epacts

| 0 | 11 | 22 | 3 | 14 | 25 | 6 | 17 | 28 | 9 | 20 | 1 | 12 | 23 | 4 | 15 | 26 | 7 | 18 | The Epact is used for calculating the age of the Moon on any | The true age of the moon on Oct. 10, 1865, at noon, being 20 day in any year. To do this, (1) Add together the day of the days and 14 hours. month and the Epact: (2) If the month is one later on in the The use of the Epacts (in connexion with the Sunday letters), year than March, add also the number of months including for finding out Easter Day, may be thus illustrated for the year March and the one for which the calculation is required. The 1887. Find out the moon's age for some day on which Easter result will give the moon's age within a fraction of a day. | can fall, say April 1st. Thus:

1887. April 1 1865. October 10th.

6 Epact. 3 The Epact.

2 March and April inclusive.

13

8 months from March to October, inclusive. days 21 = Approximate age of the Moon.

days 9 = age of the moon on April 1. The Paschal Full Moon is the 14th day of the Moon's age, and this will be April 6th. (2) Easter Day being the Sunday after the Paschal Full Moon, and B being the Sunday letter for 1887, the first B after April 6th will show that April 10th is Easter Day in that year.

1 'Emaktai nepas. Intercalary days.

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Nov. 29
Dec.

11 12

One

13

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Twenty-seven
Twenty-seven
Twenty-seven
Twenty-seven
Twenty-seven
Twenty-six
Twenty-six
Twenty-six
Twenty-six
Twenty-six
Twenty-six
Twenty-six
Twenty-five
Twenty-five
Twenty-five
Twenty-five
Twenty-five
Twenty-five
Twenty-five
Twenty-four
Twenty-four
Twenty-four
Twenty-four
Twenty-four
Twenty-four
Twenty-four
Twenty-three
Twenty-three
Twenty-three
| Twenty-three

Twenty-three
Twenty-three
Twenty-three
Twenty-two
Twenty-two

12

Four

13

14

15

Four
Four
Five
Five
Five
Five

Five
Five
Five

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10

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NOTE, that in a Bissextile or Leap Year, the Number of Sundays after Epiphany will be the

same, as if Easter Day had fallen One Day later than it really does. And for the same
reason, One Day must, in every Leap Year, be added to the Day of the Month given by
the Table for Septuagesima Sunday: And the like must be done for the First Day of Lent
(commonly called Ash-Wednesday), unless the Table gives some Day in the Month of
March for it; for in that case the Day given by the Table is the right Day.

The order in which this Table follows the others makes its use | Table is given as a means of finding out for any year, pasto sufficiently evident. The two first Tables being given for the future, the respective dates of these days, according to that of purpose of finding the date of the Festival by which all the Easter. The Note respecting Leap Year must not be overlooked moveable Holydays are regulated, and a third added which sets / when this Table is used. forth all the moveable Holydays for many years to come, this

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The Golden Numbers in the foregoing Calendar
will point out the Days of the Paschal Full
Moons, till the Year of our Lord 1900; at which

Time, in order that the Ecclesiastical Full Moons
may fall nearly on the same Days with the real
Full Moons, the Golden Numbers must be
removed to different Days of the Calendar, as is
done in the annexed Table, which contains so
much of the Calendar then to be used, as is
necessary for finding the Paschal Full Moons,
and the Feast of Easter, from the Year 1900, to
the Year 2199 inclusive. This Table is to be
made use of, in all respects, as the first Table
before inserted, for finding Easter till the
Year 1899.

XVIII

VII

AAMUAAMUAAROMUAAROMUAAROMU

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This Table is simply for revising the first and third columns of that portion of the Calendar which extends over the Paschal limits, i. e. those days in March and April that Easter can pos.

sibly fall on. It will not come into use beforo the year 1900, and is then applicable for three hundred years.

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