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Mark i. 14, 15.
Acts xx. 21.
Acts v. 31.
2 Cor. vii. 10.

Holy Commu

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5. truly repent, and unfeignedly believe , liberet vos ab omni malo; conservet cr. Absolution at

his holy Gospel. Wherefore let us be- et confirmet in bono; et ad vitam nion. Ezek. xxxvi. 26, seech him to grant us true repentance, perducat æternam. Amen.

and his holy Spirit, that those things Absolutionem et remissionem om

may please him, which we do at this nium peccatorum vestrorum, spatium iv. present, and that the rest of our life veræ pænitentiæ, emendationem vitæ, 1. 38. hereafter may be pure and holy, so gratiam et consolationem Sancti Spiri14. that at the last we may come to his tus, tribuat vobis omnipotens et miseri

eternal joy, through Jesus Christ our cors Dominus. Amen.]

Lord. * Ps. cvi. 46. The people shall answer here, and at the end

of all other prayers, Amen.

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Acts xx. 36.
2 Chron. vi. 13.

xxi. 5. Luke xxii. 4.

Then the Minister shall kneel, and say the Ad Matutinas . . . . dicat sacerdos Pater Noster Salisbury Use.
Lords Prayer with an audible voice; the et Ave Maria.
People also kneeling, and repeating it with
him, both here, and wheresoever else it is
used in Divine Service.
UR Father, which art in Heaven, (IIATEP ñuñv ó év tois oúpavois, Ma10. vi. 9. 13.
Hallowed be thy Name. Thy | dyrao býtw óvouá gov. 'EXOétw ń

Matt. vi. 9. 13.

away by the word “declaratory,” so often used to distinguish this / sin to an extent correlative with the extent of penitence in those from the other two forms of Absolution used in the Prayer over whom it is uttered. As was said in the case of the general Book; for to “ declare” God's pardon of sinners is to give effect Confession, that it does not supersede a particular confession ; to that pardon, as when the authorized subordinate of an earthly so it must be remembered that the general Absolution does not sovereign declares pardon in that sovereign's name. This form is, supersede a particular one. But the necessity for absolution is so in fact, closely analogous to the formulary of Baptism used in the great, that the Church has provided against any one being without Eastern Church,—“The servant of God (N.) is baptized in the it by this daily utterance of it, in which it is cast abroad as the Name of the Father, Amen, and of the Son, Amen, and of the Holy Sower sowed his seed, or as God sends His rain upon the just and Ghost, Amen.” And as these words are undoubtedly sufficient for the unjust. It is a ministration in close analogy with the confulfilling our Lord's words, “Baptizing them in the name of the tinual superabundance of the mercies of God in Christ, which flow Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost," so are the down even to the skirts of our High Priest's clothing. According absolving words of our Absolution sufficient to fulfil His other to the words, "freely ye have received, freely give," the Church words, “Whose soever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto casts her bread upon the waters in faith, believing that God's them."

word of absolution will not return unto Him void. And for its The special form in which the Absolution is moulded was pro efficiency, in the words of a recent writer, “all that is needed is bably adopted from a careful consideration of the use which was that there be fit, i. e. truly repentant recipients of it; that to be made of it. It is an Absolution uttered over a mixed con secured, wheresoever it touches, it blesses and heals ?." gregation, and yet it can only be efficacious towards those who The people shall answer] The words “here and at the end of have honestly said the Confession as it is intended to be said. all other prayers" were added by Bishop Cosin. He also wished The conditions of pardon are therefore distinctly expressed, that to make a marked separation between the portion of the service the impenitent may not be misled, and take to themselves a ending with the Absolution, and that beginning with the Lord's forgiveness to which they have no claim. And as it is a public Prayer. After the “Amen” to the former he wrote, “ Place Absolution, “ He pardoneth and absolveth” is adopted in analogy | here a fleuron," and at the head of the Lord's Prayer, over leaf, with the“ tribuat vobis omnipotens et misericors Dominus,” rather he has made a note, “Set here a faire compartment (ornathan the positive form, “by His authority I absolve," as used in mental page-heading) before this title." And although he has not absolving individual penitents'.

erased the previous title before the Sentences, he has here repeated The effect of this Absolution in the daily services of the Church it,-“ An Order for Morning Prayer." He probably contemplated is (1) to reconcile the Church, as a community, daily to her God, the occasional use of a short service, from which all before the through the mercies of Christ; (2) to prepare each person present Lord's Prayer was to be omitted. In the first series of his notes for the work of offering praise to Him; (3) to convey pardon of on the Prayer Book (Works, v. 47), Bishop Cosin has also

written on the Lord's Prayer, “Here begins the service; for that | The ancient form of Confession, Misereatur, and Absolution, was as

which goes before is but a preparation to it, and is newly added follows, being used in the midst of the preces at Prime and Compline.

in King Edward's Second Book, in imitation of the Liturgy and The Priest, looking towards the Altar, I confess to God, the Blessed Mary, and all the Saints (turning to the

Mass of the Church of Rome. But as their hours begin with the chuir), and to you, that I have sinned exceedingly in thought, word, and Lord's Prayer, so begins our mattins, and the high service of the deed, of my own fault (looking back to the Altar). I beseech Holy Mary, I altar. And they begin as they should do, for this was the ancient all the Saints of God, and (looking back to the Choir) ye to pray for me.

custom of the Christians, when they were met together to pray; The Choir replies, turning to the Priest, Almighty God have mercy upon you, and forgive you all your sins,

they said that prayer for a foundation and a beginning of all the deliver you from all evil, preserve and strengthen you in all goodness, and | rest, which Christ Himself had taught them.” [Cf. Works ii. 9.] bring you to everlasting life. Amen. Then the Choir, turning to the Altar,

THE LORD'S PRAYER. I confess to God .... to pray for me.

Then the Minister] From 1552 to 1661, the Rubric stood, Then let the Priest say to the Choir, in the first person, if necessary,

“Then shall the Minister begin the Lord's Prayer with a loud Almighty God have mercy upon you,... everlasting life. Amen.

The Almighty and merciful Lord grant you Absolution and Remission of voice." Before 1552, it had been “The Priest being in the all your sins, space for true repentance, amendment of life, and the grace and consolation of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

1 Principles of Divine Service, i. 317

teads, “And the

is erased in the

Kingdom come. Thy will be done in Baoilea cov yenOntw to Denuá cov,
Earth, As it is in Heaven. Give us | ως εν ουρανό και επί της γης. Τον άρτον
this day our daily bread. And forgive | ημών τον επιούσιον δος ημίν σήμερον.
us our trespasses, As we forgive them, | Και άφες ημίν τα οφειλήματα ημών, ως
that trespass against us. And lead us kai nueis apieuev tos OPELNÉTAIS ņuwv.

not into temptation; But deliver us Kai un cioevéyys nuas eis Telpao povo The Irish Ms. from evil: For thine is the Kingdom', arta pusai nuas áTÒ TOÙ Trompoû. "OTI power," but and the Power, and the Glory, For ever coll ĉotiv ń Baoireia, kaì ý dúvajis, kai sealed copies and ever. Amen.

SóẸa Eis ToÙs ai@vas. ^Aumv.] I Then likewise he shall say,

Postea sacerdos incipiat servitium hoc modo: Salisbury Use. Ps.li 15. O Lord, open thou our lips.

Domine, labia mea aperies.
Answer.
And our mouth shall shew forth thy

Chorus respondeat. Et os meum an

uy nuntiabit laudem tuam.
praise.
Priest.

Sacerdos statim. Deus in adjutorium
O God, make speed to save us. meum intende.
Answer.

R. Domine, ad adjuvandum me fes-
O Lord, make haste to help us. tina.

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Isa. vi. 3. kev. iv. 8.

quire, shall begin with a loud voice the Lord's Prayer, called the some special relation to some peculiar member. For the first Paternoster.It was altered to its present form by Bishop petition may not unfitly be thought the prayer of angels; the Cosin. The mattins began here in the Prayer Book of 1549; second, the prayer of the saints departed; the third, the prayer and before that time, the Lord's Prayer was said secretly by the of the faithful living; the fourth, the prayer of all creatures; the Priest, the public part of the service beginning with the “ Domine, fifth, the prayer of penitent sinners; the sixth, the prayer of labia mea aperies," as is shown in the Latin Rubric printed infants." before that versicle.

The various modes in which saints have used this Divine with him] That is, simultaneously, clause by clause.

prayer with a special intention, are almost infinite; and it would wheresoever it is used in Divine Service] Bishop Cosin be well for every one to follow their example, by having such a overlooked the Rubric immediately before the Lord's Prayer in special intention in view whenever it is said in the Services of the the Communion Service, which directs the priest to say it, with Sanctuary. In this place, at any rate, it should be offered up as out any direction as to the people. It is not likely that there was the complement and crown of the Absolution and Confession, on any intention of overriding that Rubric by this.

the one hand; and laid hold of, on the other hand, as a mediaThe Doxology was added here in 1661, but not by Bishop Cosin, torial key, by which the door of heaven is to be opened for the who wrote among some “ Directions to be given to the printer," ascent of the Church's praises to the Throne of God. It is “Never print the Lord's Prayer beyond-deliver us from evil. a prayer, says the old “Mirroure," that said in the Unity of Amen." The Doxology is supposed not to bave been in the | the Church, is never unsped. original of St. Matthew, as it is not in St. Luke. In the ancient Some ancient English versions of the Lord's Prayer will be Liturgies of the East, after “deliver us from evil ” (said, with found in the notes to Evening Prayer; where also will be found the rest of the prayer, by the people), the priest offers a prayer an exposition and a paraphrase; the one, an ancient one, illus. against the evil and the Evil One, called the Embolismus; and trating the general meaning of the Lord's Prayer; the other, the Doxology is then sung by the people. Probably this is a | modern, drawing out its fulness as a prayer for the Unity of the primitive usage ; and the antiphon so sung has crept into the Church, according to the method of special intention above text of the Gospel.

suggested. The paraphrase of Bishop Andrewes, in his note on the

THE VERSICLES. Lord's Prayer here, is very concise and instructive.

O Lord, open Thou] These versicles and responses have been Our Father. Etsi læsus est, Pater est.

used time immemorial as the opening of the daily service of Which art in Heaven. Eminenter, non inclusive.

praise which the Church continually offers to God. They are Hallowed be Thy Name. In me, per me, super me.

mentioned in the rule of St. Benedict (the great founder of the Thy Kingdom come. Ut destruatur regnum peccati, per quod Benedictine order, which guarded and expressed the devotional regnavit mors et diabolus.

system of the Church for so many ages, and who died in A.D. 543), In earth. In me, qui sum terra.

as the prefatory part of the service; and he probably adopted In heaven. A sanctis angelis.

them from the previous custom of the Church; the two Psalms Give us this day our daily. Pro necessitate.

from which they are taken having been used at the beginning of Bread. Proprium, licite acquisitum, supercelestem et corpo | the daily Offices in the East from the earliest ages. Taken from reum.

such a source, with only the change from the singular to the Forgive us our trespasses. Talenta dimitte.

plural number in the pronouns', they form a most fitting prefix Lead us not. Nec sinas intrare ductos pronosque.

1 This change of pronouns was made in 1552. A reason for retaining the

singular is given in an old exposition of the services. "And take heed From evil. Ab authore mali ] extra mundo.

that all this verse, both that part that is said of one alone, and that that is | intra, nobismetipsis.

answered of all together, are said in the singular number; as when ye say fculpæ per gratiam.

'mine,' or 'me,' and not our,' or 'us,' in token that ye begin your praising

and prayer in the person of holy Church, which is one, and not many. For A malo pænæ per misericordiam.

though there be many members of holy Church, as there are many Christian omni per pacem.

men and women, yet they make one body, that is holy Church, whereof Its fitness for use in the manner here directed by the Church Christ is the Head." Mirror xli. The same commentary explains, that is also beautifully brought out by Sir Richard Baker. “Though

"O Lord, open thou my lips," and its response, were used only at Mattins,

because all the day after the lips should remain ready for God's praises. this prayer is the supplication of the whole body of the Church,

["The Mirroure of our Ladye" is a commentary on the daily Services, and of every member thereof; yet each petition seems to bave written for the Nuns of Sion, and printed in 1530.)

ab authore mol; Sextra | diabolo.

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Psalmum

Sequatur invitatorium hoc modo.

Venite...............

that of the Old

[Invitatory entire.]
VENITE, exultemus Domino, jubi- [The version is
lemus Deo salutari nostro: præoc- Italic.)

cupemus faciem ejus in confessione, et
rith | in psalmis jubilemus ei.
zlad

13983d. 10,11

rvice. | found so placed in the earliest English services, those which are praise usually called “Anglo-Saxon.” It also occurs in the same posi

Daily tion in the daily offices of the Eastern and the Roman Churches iven to at the present day: so that the Church throughout the world opens Psalms. its lips day by day with the same words of faith in the Blessed musical Trinity, and of devout praise to each Person ; worshipping one ways a God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity. The addition of the litch in succeeding versicle and response gives to this unity of praise on we con earth a further likeness to the unity of praise which was revealed cle is a to St. John: “And a voice came out of the throne, saying, Thee, Praise our God, all ye His servants, and ye that fear Him, both

small and great. And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of

mighty thunderings, saying, Alleluia ; for the Lord God omnithe first potent reigneth” (Rev. xix. 6). indepen In the Prayer Book of 1549 the old usage of saying the hymns in

| “Hallelujah ” from Easter to Trinity Sunday in this place was ig equally continued. It was expunged altogether in 1552 ; restored in the our Lord English form, “ Praise ye the Lord,” and for constant use, in the before the Elizabethan revision. The response to it, “ The Lord's Name be

mn under praised,” is first found in the Scottish Prayer Book of 1637, the form, Alvour

και πνεύματι, and was inserted here in 1661. The latter represents in an “giving glory to the one Father, and to the Son, and so the Holy unvarying form the variable invitatories which used to precede Ghost,” and a hymn of about the same date is printed by the Venite in the old Latin services. Dr. Routh, in which there is an evident trace of the same custom : There are two old customs still kept up with respect to the úuvoûuev tarépa kal vidy, kal áyrov tveŪua Ocoû, “ Praise we the Gloria Patri. The one is that of turning to the East, as in the Father and Son, and Holy Spirit of God.” It is also referred to recitation of a Creed, whenever it is said or sung in Divine even earlier by Justin Martyr. The Arian heretics made a great Service; an usage enjoined in the ancient Psaiter of the Church point of using Church phraseology in their own novel and heretical of England, and still observed, e. g. at Manchester Cathedral. sense; and they introduced the custom of singing their hymn in The other custom is a more general one, that of reverently the form, “ Glory be to the Father, by the Son, and in the Holy inclining the head during the first half of the hymn, as a humble Ghost,” which evaded the recognition of each Person as God. It gesture recognizing the Divine glory of each of the Three Persons ; thus became necessary for the Church to adopt a form less capable and in imitation of the gesture of the angels, who veil their faces of perversion; and in ancient liturgies it is found as it is still used with their wings when singing to the glory of the Trinity in the in the Eastern Church, “Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, vision of Isaiah. An old Canon of the Church of England and to the Holy Ghost, now and ever, world without end." In enjoips : “ Quotiesque dicitur Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui the Western Church, the second part, “ As it was in the begin. | Sancto, ad eadem verba Deo humiliter se inclinent.” Wilkins' ning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end,” has been Conc. iii. 20. And in the “Mirroure," there is the direction, used for nearly as long a period, being found ordered in the fifth “ Ye incline at Gloria Patri.” Canon of the Council of Vaison, presided over by Cæsarius of Bishop Cosin wished to revive the use of Invitatories on Sun. Arles, in A.D. 529. The use of the hymn in this place, after the days, having inserted this Rubric in the Prayer Book which was Domine ad adjuvandim, is also recognized by the rule of St. laid before the Revisers of 1661, immediately after “Praise ye Benedict a few years further on in the sixth century; and it is l the Lord :” “ And upon any Sunday, or Lord's Day, this com

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quire, shall begin with a loud voice the Lord's Prayer, called the some special relation to some peculiar member. For the first Paternoster.” It was altered to its present form by Bishop petition may not unfitly be thought the prayer of angels; the Cosin. The mattins began here in the Prayer Book of 1549; second, the prayer of the saints departed; the third, the prayer and before that time, the Lord's Prayer was said secretly by the of the fnithful living; the fourth, the prayer of all creatures; the Priest, the public part of the service beginning with the “ Domine, fifth, the prayer of penitent sinners; the sixth, the prayer of labia mea aperies," as is shown in the Latin Rubric printed infants." before that versicle.

The various modes in which saints have used this Divine with him) That is, simultaneously, clause by clause.

prayer with a special intention, are almost infinite; and it would wheresoever it is used in Divine Service] Bishop Cosin be well for every one to follow their example, by having such a overlooked the Rubric immediately before the Lord's Prayer in special intention in view whenever it is said in the Services of the the Communion Service, which directs the priest to say it, with Sanctuary. In this place, at any rate, it should be offered up as out any direction as to the people. It is not likely that there was the complement and crown of the Absolution and Confession, on any intention of overriding that Rubric by this.

the one hand; and laid hold of, on the other hand, as a mediaThe Doxology was added here in 1661, but not by Bishop Cosin, torial key, by which the door of heaven is to be opened for the who wrote among some “Directions to be given to the printer," ascent of the Church's praises to the Throne of God. It is “Never print the Lord's Prayer beyond-deliver us from evil. a prayer, says the old “ Mirroure,” that said in the Unity of Amen." The Doxology is supposed not to have been in the the Church, is never unsped. original of St. Matthew, as it is not in St. Luke. In the ancient Some ancient English versions of the Lord's Prayer will be Liturgies of the East, after “deliver us from evil ” (said, with found in the notes to Evening Prayer ; where also will be found the rest of the prayer, by the people), the priest offers a prayer an exposition and a paraphrase; the one, an ancient one, illusagainst the evil and the Evil One, called the Embolismus; and trating the general meaning of the Lord's Prayer ; the other, the Doxology is then sung by the people. Probably this is a modern, drawing out its fulness as a prayer for the Unity of the primitive usage; and the antiphon so sung has crept into the Church, according to the method of special intention above text of the Gospel.

suggested. The paraphrase of Bishop Andrewes, in his note on the

THE VERSICLES. Lord's Prayer here, is very concise and instructive.

O Lord, open Thou] These versicles and responses have been Our Father. Etsi læsus est, Pater est.

used time immemorial as the opening of the daily service of Which art in Heaven. Eminenter, non inclusive.

praise which the Church continually offers to God. They are Hallowed be Thy Name. In me, per me, super me.

mentioned in the rule of St. Benedict (the great founder of the Thy Kingdom come. Ut destruatur regnum peccati, per quod Benedictine order, which guarded and expressed the devotional regnavit mors et diabolus.

system of the Church for so many ages, and who died in A.D. 543), In earth. In me, qui sum terra.

as the prefatory part of the service; and he probably adopted In heaven. A sanctis angelis.

them from the previous custom of the Church; the two Psalms Give us this day our daily. Pro necessitate.

from which they are taken having been used at the beginning of Bread. Proprium, licite acquisitum, supercælestem et corpo. | the daily Offices in the East from the earliest ages. Taken from reum.

such a source, with only the change from the singular to the Forgive us our trespasses. Talenta dimitte.

plural number in the pronouns?, they form a most fitting prefix Lead us not. Nec sinas intrare ductos pronosque.

I This change of pronouns was made in 1552. A reason for retaining the Catdiabolo.

singular is given in an old exposition of the services. “And take heed From evil. Ab authore mali extra ( mundo.

that all this verse, both that part that is said of one alone, and that that is intra, nobismetipsis.

answered of all together, are said in the singular number; as when ye say

'mine,' or 'me,' and not our,'or us,' in token that ye begin your praising sculpæ per gratiam.

and prayer in the person of holy Church, which is one, and not many. Por A malo pænæ per misericordiam.

though there be many members of holy Church, as there are many Christian Lomni per pacem.

men and women, yet they make one body, that is holy Church, whereof Its fitness for use in the manner here directed by the Church

Christ is the Head." Mirror xli. The same commentary explains, that is also beautifully brought out by Sir Richard Baker. “Though

"O Lord, open thou my lips," and its response, were used only at Mattins,

because all the day after the lips should remain ready for God's praises. this prayer is the supplication of the whole body of the Church,

("The Mirroure of our Ladye" is a commentary on the daily Services, and of every member thereof; yet each petition seems to bave written for the Nuns of Sion, and printed in 1530.)

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Here all standing up, the Priest shall say,
Glory be to the Father, and to the Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Salisbury Use.
Son : and to the Holy Ghost;

Sancto.
Answer.
As it was in the beginning, is now, Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et
and ever shall be : world without end. semper, et in sæcula sæculorum.
Amen.

Amen.
Priest.
Praise ye the Lord.

Alleluia [vel Laus Tibi, Domine,
Answer.

Rex æternæ gloriæ].
The Lord's Name be praised.
Then shall be said, or sung this Psalm follow- | Sequatur invitatorium hoc modo. Psalmum
ing: Except on Easter-Day, upon which
another Anthem is appointed ; and on the
Nineteenth day of every month it is not to
be read here, but in the ordinary course of
the Psalms.

[Invitatory entire.]
COME, let us sing unto the VENITE, exultemus Domino, jubi- [The version is

Lord • let us heartily rejoice in lemus Deo salutari nostro : præoc- Italic.)
the strength of our salvation.

cupemus faciem ejus in confessione, et
Let us come before his presence with in psalmis jubilemus ei.
thanksgiving : and shew our selves glad
in him with Psalms.

Venite ...............

Venite, exulte. mus Domino, Ps. 95.

that of the old

to the Psalmody which is so integral a portion of Divine Service. | found so placed in the earliest English services, those which are Except the Lord open our lips, we cannot show forth His praise usually called “Anglo-Saxon." It also occurs in the same posiwith the heart. They are the “ Sursum Corda” of the Daily tion in the daily offices of the Eastern and the Roman Churches Service, and yet have a tone of humility and even penitence, given to at the present day: so that the Church throughout the world opens them by their derivation from the fifty-first and seventieth Psalms. its lips day by day with the same words of faith in the Blessed It is probably to express this penitential tone that the musical Trinity, and of devout praise to each Person ; worshipping one note to which the first of them is said by the Priest is always a God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity. The addition of the low one, being depressed as much as a fifth from the pitch in succeeding versicle and response gives to this unity of praise on which the Lord's Prayer has been recited : and also that we con earth a further likeness to the unity of praise which was revealed tinue kneeling till the Gloria Patri. The second versicle is a to St. John: “And a voice came out of the throne, saying, paraphrase of the “Hosanna,”-Save, Lord, we beseech Thee, Praise our God, all ye His servants, and ye that fear Him, both with which our Lord was led in triumph to the Temple.

small and great. And I heard as it were the voice of a great

multitude, and as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of GLORIA PATRI.

mighty thunderings, saying, Alleluia ; for the Lord God omniThe beautiful dogmatic anthem which is here used for the first | potent reigneth” (Rev. xix. 6). time in the service is of primitive origin, and, if not an indepen. In the Prayer Book of 1549 the old usage of saying the dently inspired form, is naturally traceable to the angelic hymns in “ Hallelujah ” from Easter to Trinity Sunday in this place was Isaiah vi. 3, and Luke ii. 13, the Trinitarian form of it being equally continued. It was expunged altogether in 1552; restored in the traceable to that of the baptismal formula ordained by our Lord English form, “ Praise ye the Lord," and for constant use, in the in Matt. xxviii. 19. Clement of Alexandria, who wrote before the Elizabethan revision. The response to it, “ The Lord's Name be end of the second century, refers to the use of this hymn under praised,” is first found in the Scottish Prayer Book of 1637, the form, Αινούντες τω μόνω πατρί και υιώ και το αγίω πνεύματι, and was inserted here in 1661. The latter represents in an “giving glory to the one Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy unvarying form the variable invitatories which used to precede Ghost," and a hymn of about the same date is printed by the Venite in the old Latin services. Dr. Routh, in which there is an evident trace of the same custom : There are two old customs still kept up with respect to the úuvo Wuer hat épa kal vidy, kal aylov aveŪua coû, “ Praise we the Gloria Patri. The one is that of turning to the East, as in the Father and Son, and Holy Spirit of God.” It is also referred to | recitation of a Creed, whenever it is said or sung in Divine even earlier by Justin Martyr. The Arian heretics made a great Service; an usage enjoined in the ancient Psalter of the Church point of using Church phraseology in their own novel and heretical of England, and still observed, e. g. at Manchester Cathedral. sense; and they introduced the custom of singing their hymn in The other custom is a more general one, that of reverently the form, “ Glory be to the Father, by the Son, and in the Holy inclining the head during the first half of the hymn, as a humble Ghost," which evaded the recognition of each Person as God. It gesture recognizing the Divine glory of each of the Three Persons ; thus became necessary for the Church to adopt a form less capable and in imitation of the gesture of the angels, who veil their faces of perversion; and in ancient liturgies it is found as it is still used with their wings when singing to the glory of the Trinity in the in the Eastern Church, “Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, vision of Isaiah. An old Canon of the Church of England and to the Holy Ghost, now and ever, world without end." In enjoins : “Quotiesque dicitur Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui the Western Church, the second part, “As it was in the begin. | Sancto, ad eadem verba Deo humiliter se inclinent.” Wilkins' ning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end,” has been Conc. iii. 20. And in the “Mirroure,” there is the direction, used for nearly as long a period, being found ordered in the fifth | “Ye incline at Gloria Patri.” Canon of the Council of Vaison, presided over by Cæsarius of Bishop Cosin wished to revive the use of Invitatories on Sun. Arles, in A.D. 529. The use of the hymn in this place, after the days, having inserted this Rubric in the Prayer Book which was Domine ad adjuvandum, is also recognized by the rule of St. laid before the Revisers of 1661, immediately after “ Praise ye Benedict a few years further on in the sixth century; and it is l the Lord :” “And upon any Sunday, or Lord's Day, this com.

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