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to the north of the tower retained the original 16th century roof, painted blue, with gold stars.

The church of 1760-1856, of which many sketches and drawings remain, is well remembered by many of the older parishioners, and was an oblong barnlike structure, pewed and galleried, and without a chancel, the east window being of the type termed "Venetian"—a round-headed centre light, divided from two square-headed ones by round pillars. In 1837 a transept across the east end was added, forming a small chancel and providing additional sittings.

As to these buildings I think we may agree with Mr. Cox when he says that the "building of 1760 "was nearly everything a church should not be; "that the additions of 1837 were in worse taste "than those of 1760; and that the whole combined "in an eminent degree the ignorance of the "eighteenth with the pretentious meanness of the "nineteenth century, and constituted what used "to be called in one's boyhood an extremely neat "edifice!"

There are many old gravestones in the churchyard, but few bearing more than initials and a date, and many undecipherable. There is an old stone— a fiat grave cross—with incised carving, the only word now remaining being Absolvo, in Gothic letters. Only the foot of the cross, with three steps, is now left, the stone having been broken into two pieces. The larger portion is now worn quite smooth, though when I first remember it, it was covered with the incised work and inscription. It was found some thirty years ago, in digging a grave to the west of the tower, and measures about 54ms. by about 15ms.

The "rude forefathers of the hamlet" have left but one monument—that of Mary Wilson, wife of Richard Pauper, 19 Oct., 1790—in the place where they sleep. Where is the "burial place in "ye chancell " for which the "great man Walley" gave three fields? The Waleys, the Litherlands, and the Meolses have long since mingled their dust with that of the nameless dead, and their place knows them no more.

APPENDIX B.

THE BELLS.

Though there was a tower, or more probably a spire, at Wallasey Church as early as the 13th century, the earliest mention of the bells seems to be about twenty years after the present " steeple" had been erected on the base of its predecessor, in

I530

In the returns as to "Church Goods," made in the third year of Edward VI (1550)—those for the Hundred of Wirral (Church Goods, Cheshire, 2. R. ^) being certified by John Massey, Kt., and Rowland Stanley, Esq.—" Kyrkeby Walley" appears as having " ij Chaless," and " a ringe of iij belles."

The " first bell" was recast in 1624, as noted in the Register Book :—

"Mem that vppon the Seventeenth day of June "A'no D'ni 1624 the first bell belonging to this "Church was new cast by William Clibbery Bel"founder at ye Holt al's the Towne of Lyons ;*6 "The new casting whereof Cost 71' & I2d That is "to say—41' 10s for Casting it and 51s for ffifty one "Pound of mettall that was added vnto it." .

"Henry Bird {Churchwardens "Geo: Walker) for that yeare."

46 Holt in Flintshire—formerly Castell Lleon.

The Churchwardens' Accounts, beginning in the year 1658, contain many notes in reference to the bells, consisting chiefly of expenses incurred in repairing the wheels and frame, new bell ropes, "gugons," or "gudgeons," and in "oyle" and "liquour" to grease the bells; but none of any great interest until 1672-3, when the "little bell" was recast. The churchwardens then received— "for 31 pounds of bell mettle, 01 : 03 : 03," and incurred the following expenses :—

for cutting the mettle out of the

great bell 00 : 04 : 06

expended on men in assisting to

raise the bell 00 : 01 : 06

for cleansing the Steeple - - - 00 : 01 : 00 paid to Lanckshaw that undertooke

to cast the little bell & faild - - 00 : 06 : 06 expended on him & others - - - 00 : 01 : 00 Spent in agreeing wth Wm- Poultney

at Liuerpooletomakebellwheeles 00 : 02 : 00 for wood and boards to make bell

wheeles 01 : 04 : 06

for ash wood for the worke - - - 00 : 07 : 00 to Tho: Hill & Rob: Willson for

wood to be beams to the bell

wheeles op : 04 : 10

pd \ym. Poultney for his worke - - 01 : 00 : 00 pd to Edward Richardson for his

worke 00 : 19 : 00

Spent on the workmen during the

whole time of working - - - 00 : 06 : 00 Spent when certaine of the p'sh &

wee agreed wth Wm- Scott to cast

the bell - - - 00 : og : 00

pd for drawing articles on both sides 00 : 05 : 00 Spent when the bell was taken down 00 : 03 : 00 & at loading of the bell - - - - 00 : 01 : 00

D

pd 3 mens charges to goe over wlh

the bell to Liurpoole being constrained to stay all night at Liur

poole 00:04:06

for ferry for the bell 00:01:06

for a cart & weighing the bell at

Liurpoole 00 : 01 : 08

for a Horse to Wiggan to see the

bell cast 00 : 04 : 00

for keeping the horse two nights

& two shoes 00 : 01 : 05

Spent in tarrying two days & two

nights my owne charges - - - 00 : 06 : 08 given to the bellfounders at and

before the casting of the bell

& to a company of assistants in

breaking the ground to take the

bell out of the mould in meat &

drinke 00 : 12 : 09

for ferry to come back againe - - 00 : 00 : 06 pd for ferry of the bell from Liuer

poole 00: 01: 06

Spent at loading of the bell at Seacombe & bringing to the Church 00 : 04 : 00 pd for iron to make bolts & clapes

for the new bell 00 : 08 : 06

pd to Sam: Preeson forworke of the

new bell - - 00 : 08 : 00

pd to Thomas Gill for his worke at

the new bell 00 : 04 : 06

pd for two new bell ropes - - - 00 : 06 : 00 pd for part of a rope for the third bell 00 : 01 : 06 for one new bell clapper for flighting

the other two & makeing new

bowles 01: 05^06

for mending one clapper wch broke 00 : 03 : 06 the first money we pd to Wm- Scott 01 : 16:

expended on Wm- Scott at Chester

not haueing money to pay him

according to promise & day - - 00 : 02 : 06 borrowed at Liurpoole to pay Wm

Scott 04 : 00 : 00

for addition of 26 pound of mettle

to the bell 01 : 06:

for ringing both Novembers & Candles 00 : 10: pd to J ames Scambler for Wm Scotts

use 03::

The usual repairs and expenses continue until 1687, the following being a few of the more interesting entries:—

1675. for 6 foot of thick plank for the

bell ropes to run through, s. d.

and wood for bushes - - 02 : 04

1676. x at letting the great bell downe

on the workemen & some

others of the p'sh - - - 00 : 01 : 06 1680. to assistants 3 severall dayes to

raise the 3 bells and carryage

of wood 00 : 05 : 00

1683. to agreeing wth ye bell hanger

to hange ye bells - - - - 00 : 00 : 06 to bords to make ye wheiles

round & otr: ueses - - - 00 : 02 : 06 to planke for wheile spokes & a

pese to mend ye frams - - 00 : 02 : 00 to ferey & charges for my selfe

& ye bell hanger - - - - 00 : 01 : 06 to carage to ye water side - - 00 : 00 : 06 to a cart to the waterside to

fetch them 00 : 00 : 06

to careying y* brasses to Wigin 00 : 00 : 09 to careying them from Wigin - 00 : 00 : 09 to casting ye brasses - - - 00 : 17 : 06 to a head stock for the great

bell 00:08:00

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