SERMON PREACHED AT THE FUNERAL OBSEQUIES OF HON. CHARLES PAINE

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Seite 28 - Making it rich, and like a lily in bloom, An angel writing in a book 'of gold. Exceeding peace had made Ben Adhem bold, And, to the presence in the room he said, "What writest thou?" The vision raised its head, And, with a look made all of sweet accord, Answered, "The names of those who love the Lord." " And is mine one ? " said Abou. " Nay, not so,
Seite 28 - The angel wrote, and vanished. The next night It came again, with a great wakening light, And showed the names whom love of God had blest, And, lo! Ben Adhem's name led all the rest.
Seite 9 - Let all thy inward powers unite To love thy Maker and thy God With utmost vigor and delight. 2 " Then shall thy neighbour next in place Share thine affections and esteem ; And let thy kindness to thyself Measure and rule thy love to him.
Seite 55 - ... unhesitatingly availed himself of all the advantages which a free and liberal intercourse with men of such characteristics could give him. The youngest man I think in the Gubernatorial office in the State, I am sure there was never any man who more highly esteemed the claims of age and wisdom, and experience, or was more ready to distinguish and encourage whoever among the young gave hopeful promise of an honorable and successful public career.
Seite 58 - ... to solace him. It was on one of these darkest days, and at a time when courage, hope and health were all failing, that he said to me in his familiar mode of conversation ; " Well, Walton, whatever may become of the corporation, they cannot rob us of the road ! It is done — it will be run. — and the people will at any rate reap the blessings which we designed. Oh ! if it were not for that, I really believe I should die...
Seite 52 - I enjoyed his intimate and uninterrupted acquaintance and confidence. I see him now, as I last saw him, when a few friends took him by the hand, and bade him good bye, with tears in their eyes, as he left the station here in the cars for his journey south. The words of one of those friends, as the train left, have made an impression upon my mind that time will never efface. " That car carries more men from Northfield than it will ever bring back," was the fearful belief of us all when he left, and...
Seite 51 - The numbers here assembled on so short a notice, the deep grief depicted upon every countenance, bespeak no ordinary occurrence. Our common friend and benefactor is removed from among us. To me, this dispensation of Providence is overwhelming. Language fails to express the deep emotions that thrill through every nerve. He was my friend when I needed a friend. For seventeen years I enjoyed his intimate and uninterrupted acquaintance and confidence. I see him now, as I last saw him, when a few friends...
Seite 56 - State and his country— that you feel his death an irreparable loss and a public calamity. Weep now. It is good to weep. My connection, in an official capacity ^ with Gov. Paine, and my relations to him personally, from the commencement of the great public work on which he had staked his highest hopes, and to which I now feel he sacrificed his life, I am aware will seem to justify you in expecting that something will be said to-day 011 that topic.
Seite 56 - ... both — lost all ? I can only say, it is fit now for you to weep. Grief is the necessary burden of this day and of many days to you ; but when the .*. fountain of your tears shall fail — when you shall become weary and worn because of your great grief, then it will be fit for you to rejoice, that one has lived so briefly, yet so well, and so honorably, so unremittingly, and so successfully labored in important services for his neighborhood, his State and liis country — that you feel his...
Seite 20 - Born almost on the commencement of a century remarkable for its control of mechanical agencies and the development of popular institutions, he entered on the period of his vigour at a time most favorable for the exercise of his peculiar abilities. His father, the late Judge Paine, was one of the most honorable citizens of the State, and merited the respect which was awarded him. The influences of his home doubtless laid the foundation of that character which in subsequent life raised the son to a...

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