The Red rose and the White; or, The story of the fifty years' war between the houses of York and Lancaster

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G. Routledge and Sons, 1880 - 256 Seiten
 

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Seite 10 - Will I upon thy party wear this rose: And here I prophesy, — This brawl to-day, Grown to this faction, in the Temple garden, Shall send, between the red rose and the white, A thousand souls to death and deadly night.
Seite 191 - Thus, thus, quoth Forrest, girdling one another Within their innocent alabaster arms : Their lips were four red roses on a stalk, Which in their summer beauty kiss'd each other. A book of prayers on their pillow lay ; Which once...
Seite 10 - Let him that is a true-born gentleman, And stands upon the honour of his birth, If he suppose that I have pleaded truth, From off this brier pluck a white rose with me. Som. Let him that is no coward nor no flatterer, But dare maintain the party of the truth, Pluck a red rose from off this thorn with me.
Seite 237 - Simnell again, and the crafty priest his tutor. For Lambert, the king would not take his life, both out of magnanimity, taking him but as an image of wax, that others had tempered and moulded; and likewise out of wisdom, thinking that if he suffered death, he would be forgotten too soon; but being kept alive, he would be a continual spectacle, and a kind of remedy against the like enchantments of people in time to come. For which cause he was taken into service in his court to a base office in his...
Seite 43 - Monday afternoon the Queen came to him, and brought my Lord Prince* with her, and then he asked what the prince's name was, and the queen told him Edward ; and then he held up his hands, and thanked God thereof.
Seite 235 - He was a Prince, sad*, serious, and full of thoughts and secret observations; and full of notes and memorials* of his own hand, especially touching persons, as whom to employ, whom to reward, whom to inquire of, whom to beware of, what were the dependencies," what were the factions, and the like...
Seite 240 - Tournay, and other towns of Flanders, for a good time ; living much in English company, and having the English tongue perfect. In which time, being grown a comely youth, he was brought by some of the espials of the lady Margaret into her presence. Who viewing him well, and seeing that he had a face and personage that would bear a noble fortune ; and finding him otherwise of a fine spirit and winning behaviour ; thought she had now found a curious piece of marble to carve out an image of a duke of...
Seite 77 - And for the faithful and loving hearts, and also the great labours that ye have borne and sustained toward me in the recovering of my said right and title which I now possess, I thank you with all my heart, and if I had any better good to reward you withal than my body, ye should have it, the which shall always be ready for your defence, never sparing nor letting for no jeopardy, praying you all of your hearty assistance and good countenance, as I shall be unto you...
Seite 234 - This king, to speak of him in terms equal to his deserving, was one of the best sort of wonders ; a wonder for wise men. He had parts, both in his virtues and his fortune, not so fit for a common-place, as for observation. Certainly he was religious, both in his affection and observance. But as he could see clear, for those times, through superstition, so he would be blinded, now and then, by human policy. He advanced churchmen: he was tender in...
Seite 72 - Witness Aire's unhappy water, Where the ruthless Clifford fell ; And when Wharfe ran red with slaughter, On the day of Towcester's field, Gathering, in its guilty flood, The carnage and the ill-spilt blood, That forty thousand lives could yield. Cressy was to this but sport, Poictiers but a pageant vain, And the victory of Spain Seem'da strife for pastime meant, And the work of Agincourt Only like a tournament...

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