Memoirs of the Musical Drama, Band 1

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R. Bentley, 1838 - 464 Seiten
 

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Seite 212 - I shall say the less of Mr Collier, because in many things he has taxed me justly; and I have pleaded guilty to all thoughts and expressions of mine which can be truly argued of obscenity, profaneness, or immorality, and retract them.
Seite 76 - One day a great feast was held ; and after dinner the representation of Solomon his Temple, and the coming of the Queen of Sheba, was made, or (as I may better say) was meant to have been made, before their Majesties, by device of the Earl of Salisbury and others.
Seite 182 - Musick is yet but in its Nonage, a forward Child, which gives hope of what it may be hereafter in England, when the Masters of it shall find more Encouragement. 'Tis now learning Italian, which is its best Master, and studying a little of the French Air, to give it somewhat more of Gayety and Fashion. Thus being farther from the Sun, we are of later Growth than our Neighbour Countries, and must be content to shake off our Barbarity by degrees.
Seite 77 - Sheba ; but he fell down and humbled himself before her, and was carried to an inner chamber and laid on a bed of state ; which was not a little defiled with the presents of the Queen which had been bestowed on his garments ; such as wine, cream, jelly, beverage, cakes, spices, and other good matters.
Seite 283 - Phaedra and Hippolitus) for a people to be so stupidly fond of the Italian opera, as scarce to give a third day's hearing to that admirable tragedy ? Music is certainly a very agreeable entertainment, but if it would take the entire possession of our ears, if it would make us incapable of hearing sense, if it would exclude arts that have a much greater tendency to the refinement of human nature...
Seite 274 - AN opera may be allowed to be extravagantly lavish in its decorations, as its only design is to gratify the senses, and keep up an indolent attention in the audience.
Seite 173 - Fairest isle, all isles excelling, Seat of pleasures and of loves, Venus here will choose her dwelling And forsake her Cyprian groves. Cupid from his fav'rite nation Care and envy will remove, Jealousy, that poisons passion, And despair that dies for love. Gentle murmurs, sweet complaining, Sighs that blow the fire of love, Soft repulses, kind disdaining, Shall be all the pains you prove.
Seite 276 - This strange dialogue awakened my curiosity so far, that I immediately bought the opera, by which means I perceived that the sparrows were to act the part of singing birds in a delightful grove ; though, upon a nearer inquiry, I found the sparrows put the same trick upon the audience that Sir Martin Mar-all * practised upon his mistress : for though they flew in sight, the music proceeded from a consort of flageolets and bird-calls, which were planted behind the scenes.
Seite 106 - CHLORIS! yourself you so excel, When you vouchsafe to breathe my thought, That, like a spirit, with this spell * Of my own teaching, I am caught. That eagle's fate and mine are one, Which, on the shaft that made him die, Espied a feather of his own, Wherewith he wont to soar so high. Had Echo, with so sweet a grace, Narcissus...
Seite 196 - ... should be as different as the tone or accent of each language ; for otherwise, what may properly express a passion in one language will not do it in another. Every one who has been long in Italy knows very well, that the cadences in the recitativo bear a remote affinity to the tone of their voices in ordinary conversation, • or, to speak more properly, are only the accents of their language made more musical and tuneful.

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