Sunny Memories of Foreign Lands, Band 2

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Phillips, Sampson, 1854 - 437 Seiten
Not long after the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe traveled to Europe. On her return, she produced this book, in two volumes, €of her letters and journals during the trip. It was used widely as a guidebook by Americans traveling overseas.€This is volume two.
 

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Seite 310 - Lord, thou hast been our dwelling-place in all generations. Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever thou hadst formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, thou art God. Thou turnest man to destruction; and sayest, Return, ye children of men. For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night.
Seite 30 - Wide as his vast dominion lies, Make the Creator's name be known ; Loud as his thunder shout his praise, And sound it lofty as his throne.
Seite 347 - He that formed the eye, shall he not see ? He that planted the ear, shall he not hear...
Seite 172 - O'er other creatures: yet, when I approach Her loveliness, so absolute she seems, And in herself complete, so well to know Her own, that what she wills to do or say Seems wisest, virtuousest, discreetest, best. All higher knowledge in her presence falls Degraded : wisdom in discourse with her Loses, discountenanced, and like folly shows: Authority and reason on her wait, As one intended first, not after made Occasionally; and, to consummate all, Greatness of mind, and nobleness, their seat Build...
Seite 207 - The waters wear the stones: thou washest away the things which grow out of the dust of the earth ; and thou destroyest the hope of man. Thou prevailest for ever against him, and he passeth: thou changest his countenance, and sendest him away.
Seite 129 - Sir, it may not be given to me to pass over this Jordan ; other and better men have preceded me, and I entered into their labours ; other and better men will follow me, and enter into mine ; but this consolation I shall ever continue to enjoy — that, amidst much injustice, and somewhat of calumny, we have at last " lighted such a candle in England as, by God's blessing,
Seite 172 - O'er other creatures ; yet when I approach Her loveliness, so absolute* she seems And in herself complete, so well to know Her own, that what she wills to do or say, Seems wisest, virtuousest, discreetest, best . All higher knowledge in her presence falls Degraded, wisdom in discourse with her Loses discount'nanc'd, and like folly shows...
Seite 75 - But the severest stroke was that inflicted by the persecution, begun and pursued by persons interested in the continuance of the trade, of such witnesses as had been examined against them, and whom, on account of their dependent situation in life, it was most easy to oppress. As I had been the means of bringing these forward on these occasions, they naturally came to me, when thus persecuted, as the author of their miseries and their ruin. From their supplications and wants it would have been ungenerous...
Seite 129 - YEARS have now elapsed since I first made the proposition to the House which I shall renew this night. Never, at any time, have I felt greater apprehension or even anxiety; not through any fear of personal defeat, for disappointment is "the badge of all our tribe...
Seite 75 - The wound, which these had produced, was rendered still deeper by those cruel disappointments before related, which arose* from the reiterated refusal of persons to give their testimony, after I had travelled hundreds of miles in quest of them. But the severest stroke was that inflicted by the persecution, begun and pursued by persons interested in the continuance of the trade, of such witnesses as had been examined against them ; and whom, on account of their dependent situation in life, it was...

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