Clarence: Or, A Tale of Our Own Times

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G.P. Putnam, 1852 - 515 Seiten
The false values of city life found in fashionable New York social circles are contrasted unfavorably with the agrarian utopia of Clarenceville, New York.
 

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Seite 399 - According to my notion, it is of that character which I believe is generally allowed to be most captivating to the other sex, — fair, feminine, nay, perhaps, even fragile — ' Fair as the forms that, wove in Fancy's loom, Float in light visions round the poet's head.
Seite 181 - Is there, in human form, that bears a heart, A wretch ! a villain ! lost to love and truth ! That can, with studied, sly, ensnaring art, Betray sweet Jenny's unsuspecting youth? Curse on his perjur'd arts ! dissembling smooth ! Are honour, virtue, conscience, all exil'd?
Seite 152 - I have risen this morning like an infernal frog out of Acheron, covered with the ooze and mud of melancholy. For this reason I am not sorry to find myself at the bottom of my paper, for had I more room perhaps I might fill it all with croaking, and make an heart ache at Eartham, which I wish to be always cheerful.
Seite 182 - The lofty woods, the forests wide and long, Adorned with leaves, and branches fresh and green, In whose cool bowers the birds with many a song...
Seite 360 - And he has till his sister gane : " Now, sister, rede ye mee ; O sail I marrie the nut-browne bride, And set Fair Annet free ? " " I'se rede ye tak Fair Annet, Thomas, And let the browne bride alane ; Lest ye sould sigh, and say, Alace, What...
Seite 21 - That which hath been is now; and that which is to be hath already been; and God requireth that which is past.
Seite 147 - I tell you again, make hay while the sun shines — strike while the iron is hot — clench the nail.
Seite 54 - ... Mrs. Carroll felt awkwardly, and was glad to be relieved by a summons to the parlour, where she found the " cousin Anne," from whose gossiping scrutiny the insignificance of her humble condition did not exempt her. While Mrs. Carroll was parrying her ingenious crossexamination, relative to her guest, her husband continued the conversation with him. — "Fortunately, in our country," he said, "there are no real, no permanent distinctions, but those that are created by talent, education, and virtue....
Seite 56 - When just is seized some valued prize, And duties press, and tender ties Forbid the soul from earth to rise, — How awful then it is to die ! When, one by one, those ties are torn, And friend from friend is snatched forlorn, And man is left alone to mourn, — Ah then, how easy 'tis to die!

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