Sketches: Critical and Biographic

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J. Hogg, 1857 - 395 Seiten
 

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Seite 265 - The cock is crowing, The stream is flowing, The small birds twitter, The lake doth glitter, The green field sleeps in the sun ; The oldest and youngest Are at work with the strongest ; The cattle are grazing, Their heads never raising ; There are forty feeding like one...
Seite 24 - The cemetery is an open space among the ruins, covered in winter with violets and daisies. It might make one in love with death, to think that one should be buried in so sweet a place.
Seite 15 - I will be wise, And just, and free, and mild, if in me lies Such power, for I grow weary to behold The selfish and the strong still tyrannise Without reproach or check.
Seite 4 - From an eternity of idleness I, God, awoke ; in seven days' toil made earth From nothing ; rested, and created man : I placed him in a paradise, and there Planted the tree of evil, so that he Might eat and perish, and my soul procure Wherewith to sate its malice, and to turn, Even like a heartless conqueror of the earth, All misery to my fame.
Seite 16 - Now has descended a serener hour, And with inconstant fortune, friends return; Though suffering leaves the knowledge and the power Which says: — Let scorn be not repaid with scorn. And from thy side two gentle babes are born To fill our home with smiles, and thus are we Most fortunate beneath life's beaming morn; And these delights, and thou, have been to me The parents of the Song I consecrate to thee.
Seite 4 - Since the Incarnate came: humbly he came, Veiling his horrible Godhead in the shape Of man, scorned by the world, his name unheard, Save by the rabble of his native town, Even as a parish demagogue.
Seite 5 - Of man, scorned by the world, his name unheard, Save by the rabble of his native town, Even as a parish demagogue. He led The crowd; he taught them justice, truth, and peace, In semblance; but he lit within their souls The quenchless flames of zeal, and blest the sword He brought on earth to satiate with the blood Of truth and freedom his malignant soul.
Seite 14 - Thoughts of great deeds were mine, dear Friend, when first The clouds which wrap this world from youth did pass. I do remember well the hour which burst My spirit's sleep : a fresh May-dawn it was, When I walked forth upon the glittering grass, And wept, I knew not why: until there rose From the near schoolroom voices that, alas ! Were but one echo from a world of woes — The harsh and grating strife of tyrants and of foes.
Seite 282 - Keats, who was killed off by one critique, Just as he really promised something great, If not intelligible, - without Greek Contrived to talk about the Gods of late, Much as they might have been supposed to speak. Poor fellow! His was an untoward fate: 'Tis strange the mind, that very fiery particle, Should let itself be snuffed out by an Article.
Seite 182 - Sir, said Parr, Your Royal Highness began this conversation, and if you permit it to go on, must tolerate a very different inference. — Go on, said the Prince, I declare that Markham understood Greek better than Hurd ; for when I read Homer, and hesitated about a word, Markham immediately explained it, and then we went on ; but when I hesitated with Hurd, he always referred me to the Dictionary ; I therefore conclude he wanted to be informed himself.

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