The English Universities: From the German of V. A. Huber ...

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Statutory Regulations as to the Lectures c
428
Lord Bacon the Father of Modern wouldbe University Reformers
429
Petition from Oxford for Radical Reform of the University in 1659 Sketch of a Model College
430
Expulsion of Locke
431
That in the earliest times Oxford had a Chancellor of its own
432
The Nations considered as Corporations
434
On the SWORN OFFICERS of the Nations
435
On the actual use of the word REGENT
436
School Poem in the Reign of Henry III
438
On the position of the Faculties in the English Universities
439
On the Mendicant Orders of Monks
442
NOTE PAGE 60 On the Chancellor and Archdeacon at the Universities 445
445
Whether there may possibly have been once a Rector at Oxford distinct from the Chancellor
449
On the refusal of the Bishop to confirm without personal presentation
451
Disputes respecting the spiritual attributes of the Chan cellor
452
On the right of Episcopal Visitation at both Universities
454
On the Functions of the Chancellor
455
On the Courts of Jurisdiction of the Chancellor
458
Concerning the Commissaries
459
Cambridge Degree of 1522 appointing a Public Orator
461
On the Beadles or Bedells of the Universities 71 On College Tuition and the Veto of the Head
462
Authority of the Heads of Colleges in the University
466
The Visitations of 15557
467
On the youthful age of Graduates
470
On the Statutes of 1570 and on the Test Oaths
471
On the Board of Heads at Cambridge
473
On the election of Powerful Statesmen as Chancellors of the Universities
474
On the Cycle of Proctors
475
Details concerning University Professors their Salaries Appointment c
476
On the Abolition of the Black Congregation
479
On the right of the Chancellor to nominate his own De puties
480
On the Taxation of the Universities by the Parliament
498
On Acts of Parliament which concern the Universities
500
On the University Disputations of the Eighteenth Century
501
On the petty persecution of Whigs in Oxford in the last Century
502
Tables
503
Cambridge Honors and Ordinary Degrees in 1839
505
Cambridge Matriculations 7 Cambridge Degrees
506
Oxford Residents May 1842
507
Cambridge Residents November 1840
508
Clergymen and Laymen in the Cambridge Senate 1841
509
On English CANT
510
Remarks on the Morality of the Universities by the Editor
511
Oxford Examination Subjects by the Editor
521
Questions given at the Oxford Mathematical Scholar ship 1841
527
On the modern Cambridge Examination for the B A De gree with remarks on English and German Philosophy
530
Defence of the Universities from the charge of Immorality
541
Justification of not repealing and yet not enforcing or ob serving Statutes that we judge to be unsuitable
543
On the right of Selfdefence of the Universities against encroachments
547
On the nature of the Colleges and of the Universities and on the interference of the State with the Univer sities and the Colleges by the Editor
549
An account of the University of Durham by the Rev H L Jones
553
An Account of the University of London by Dr Rothman
563
APPENDICES PAGE
568
Appendix by the Author
582
Appendix to the English Edition added by James Heywood
597
On the Foundation Statutes of Corpus Christi College Oxford
618
from Dr Vaughans
628
Bart F R S M A and formerly Fellow of St Johns College
645
Remarks on University Education from the North American
660
Conclusion
680
Index
707

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Seite 692 - I, AB, do solemnly and sincerely, in the presence of God, testify and declare, upon the true faith of a Christian, that I will never exercise any power, authority, or influence which I may possess by virtue of the office of to injure or weaken the Protestant Church as it is by law established in England, or to disturb the said Church, or the bishops and clergy of the said Church, in the possession of any rights or privileges to which such Church, or the said bishops and clergy, are or may be by law...
Seite 662 - Whatever the defects of American universities may be, they ^ disseminate no prejudices ; rear no bigots ; dig up the buried ashes of no old superstitions ; never interpose between the , people and their improvement ; exclude no man because of his religious opinions ; above all, in their whole course of study and instruction, recognise a world, and a broad one too, lying beyond the college walls.
Seite 663 - Scriptures contain all things necessary to salvation : so that whatsoever is not read therein, nor may be proved thereby, is not to be required of any man, that it should be believed as an article of faith, or be thought requisite or necessary to salvation.
Seite 636 - First therefore, amongst so many great foundations of colleges in Europe, I find it strange that they are all dedicated to professions, and none left free to arts and sciences at large. For if men judge that learning should be referred to action, they judge well ; but in this they fall into the error described in the ancient fable ; in which the other parts of the body did suppose the stomach had been idle, because it neither performed the office of motion, as the limbs do, nor of sense, as the head...
Seite 640 - I hold to be an error; which is, that scholars in universities come too soon and too unripe to logic and rhetoric, arts fitter for graduates than children and novices : for these two, rightly taken, are the gravest of sciences, being the...
Seite 639 - ... to professory learning hath not only had a malign aspect and influence upon the growth of sciences, but hath also been prejudicial to states and governments. For hence it proceedeth that princes find a solitude in regard of able men to serve them in causes of...
Seite 597 - Ceolwulf, an unwise king's thane ; and he swore oaths to them and gave hostages, that it should be ready for them, on whatever day they would have it ; and that he would be ready in his own person, and with all who would follow him, for the behoof of the army.
Seite 702 - ... we do declare a Liberty to Tender Consciences and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matters of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Seite 663 - To the Honourable the Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled.
Seite 636 - For if you will have a tree bear more fruit than it hath used to do, it is not anything you can do to the boughs, but it is the stirring of the earth and putting new mould about the roots that must work it.

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