Middlemarch, by George Eliot, Band 1

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Seite 107 - ... how could she be confident that one-roomed cottages were not for the glory of God, when men who knew the classics appeared to conciliate indifference to the cottages with zeal for the glory ? Perhaps even Hebrew might be necessary — at least the alphabet and a few roots — in order to arrive at the core of things, and judge soundly on the social duties of the Christian.
Seite 1 - Miss BROOKE had that kind of beauty which seems to be thrown into relief by poor dress. Her hand and wrist were so finely formed that she could wear sleeves not less bare of style than those in which the Blessed Virgin appeared to Italian painters...
Seite 146 - ... we all of us, grave or light, get our thoughts entangled in metaphors, and act fatally on the strength of them.
Seite 356 - was always Dorothea's question. "They are, I believe, highly esteemed. Some of them represent the fable of Cupid and Psyche, which is probably the romantic invention of a literary period, and cannot, I think, be reckoned as a genuine mythical product. But if you like these...
Seite 7 - Riding was an indulgence which she allowed herself in spite of conscientious qualms; she felt that she enjoyed it in a pagan sensuous way, and always looked forward to renouncing it.
Seite 351 - That element of tragedy which lies in the very fact of frequency, has not yet wrought itself into the coarse emotion of mankind; and perhaps our frames could hardly bear much of it. If we had a keen vision and feeling of all ordinary human life, it would be like hearing the grass grow and the squirrel's heart beat, and We should die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence. As it is, the quickest of us walk about well wadded with stupidity.
Seite 251 - ... armchair to the proscenium and chat with us in all the lusty ease of his fine English. But Fielding lived when the days were longer (for time, like money, is measured by our needs), when summer afternoons were spacious, and the clock ticked slowly in the winter evenings. We belated historians must not linger after his example; and if we did so, it is probable that our chat would be thin and eager, as if delivered from a campstool in a parrot-house. I at least have so much to do in unraveling...
Seite 33 - ... when he used a Greek or Latin phrase he always gave the English with scrupulous care, but he would probably have done this in any case. A learned provincial clergyman is accustomed to think of his acquaintances as of " lords, knyghtes, and other noble and worthi men, that conue Latyn but lytille.

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