A Pictorial History of England

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J. H. Butler & Company, 1879 - 448 Seiten

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Inhalt

Laws of the AngloSaxons Modes of trial The Ordeal
26
The kingdom of England established The Danes Saxon race of kings Alfred the Great
28
More about Alfred
30
XITI About the architecture of the AngloSaxons
33
Of the learning of the AngloSaxons The Clergy
34
Alfred encourages the artsAbout the English navy Death of Alfred Reign of Edward the Elder
35
Adventures i Aulaff The Long Battle A thelstan His death
37
Edmund murdered Edred St Dunstan
38
The Monks and the Secular Clergy
40
Edgar the Peaceable Edward the Martyr
41
Kthelrod II Penances
43
Troubles with the Danes Peace made with them
44
Massacre of the Danes in England Ac Edmund Ironside Canute con quers England
45
Dress and amusements of the AngloSaxons
46
Canute the Great His rebuke of his courtiers
48
Reigns of Harold Harefoot and of Hardicanute
50
Edward the Confessor Harold About the Couquest
51
William L the Conqueror The Saxon nobles degraded
54
Game Laws Rebellion of Robert Domesday Book Death of Wil liam 1
56
England after the Norman conquest The English language
58
The Feudal System A Norman castle
59
William Rufus The sons of William the Conqueror
61
The Crusades
62
William obtains large territories by mortgage His death
64
Melancholy condition of the king Ac 6
69
Battle of Brenneville Ancient armor
70
Death of Prince William and many young nobles
71
Matilda marries Geoffrey Plant age net Death of Henry I Stephen usurps the crown
73
Proceedings of Stephen Ac
74
Matilda acknowledges the queen Ac Peace restored Death of Stephen
76
Employment of the ladies in the time of Henry EL
78
Pages Esquires and Knights
79
Surnames Education of Henry II Ac About the only Englishman that ever was made pope
81
More about Henry II Queen Eleanor
83
Thomas k Becket How he lost his rich cloak
84
Henry and the clergy Death of Becket
85
TLVIII Becket canonized by the Pope Ac
88
3IIAPTER PAGI XL1X Earl Strongbow goes over to Ireland to assist Dermot Macinorrogl The English conquer Ireland
89
The sons of Henry rebel
91
Penance of Henry II Fresh rebellions of his sons Death of Henry II
92
Of Richard the Lionhearted
94
Exploits of Richard in Palestine
96
MVPhilip returns to Europe More of Richards exploits
97
Shipwreck of Richard Ac
99
Interdict and excommunication Richard returns to England
101
Death of Richard the Lionhearted
103
John sum am ed Lackland
104
L1X John quarrels with the pope About the Jews
106
Magna Charta signed The French invade England Death of John
108
LX1I Disturbed state of England Of benevolences
112
LX11I The king and pope vs the churchmen
113
Simon de Montfort The Mad Parliament
115
Prince Edward haltle of Lewes The Mise of Lewes
116
A change in the constitution of Parliament Prince Edward escapes from imprisonment The barons subdued
117
Prince Edward goes on a crusade Death of Henry III About paint ing and illuminated manuscripts
119
Architecture Trade and the merchants of England
121
State of learning Friar Bacon Judicial Astrology Trials ly combat
122
Edward I Tournaments Battle of Chalons
124
More about Edward Conquest ot Wales Massacre of the Welsh Bards
126
LXX1LThe Maid of Norway Edward interferes in the affairs of Scotland
128
Wallace Edwards vowDeath of Edward 131
131
Famines Agriculture Customs of the time
133
LXXV1 Edward II receives Hugh Spencer into favor He is dethroned and cruelly murdered by Isabella and Roger Mortimer
134
Edward III War with Scotland Ac Peace with Scotland
136
Edward III He makes war on Scotland Claims the crown of France
138
Edward III makes war upon Philip King of France Cannon used
140
Battle of Cressy Death of the King of Bohemia Siege of Calais Story of Eustace de St Pierre
142
The Knights of the Garter The Charter House School
144
Dress in the reign of Edward III
146
LXXXIIIBattle of Poictiers King John of France taken prisoner Generous conduct of tne Black Prince
147
Honorable conduct of John King of France Death of Edward III
150
XCIH Henry IV keeps the throne Owen Glendower
165
Several rebellions against Henry IV Ac
167
Henry seizes the young Prince of Scotland Character of James I of Scotland
168
Anecdotes of Prince Henry Death of Henry IV
169
Prince Henry and the Lollard Dress of the ladies
171
Henry V Persecution of the Lollards Lord Cobham
172
Henry V invades France Ac
173
Henry again invades France Ac His death
176
CIDomestic habits of the English in the Fifteenth Century
178
Domestic habits continued State of learning Whittington Lord Mayor
179
CUI loan of Arc the Maid of Orleans lal CIV Henry VI Ac Murder of the Duke of Gloucester
184
The Duke of York forms a design to claim the crown Insurrection of Jack Cade
186
CVT Battle of St Albans The Duke of York claims the crown Warwick the kingmaker
188
Continuation of the war between the Two Roses Death of the Duke of York His son proclaimed king by the title of Edward IV
189
Edward IV The civil war continues
192
CIXMarriage of King Edward IV Battle of Barnet Death of War wick Ac
195
Edward IV is outwitted by Louis of France
198
Invention of the art of printing
200
Richard Duke of Gloucester seizes upon the young king Edward V
202
Richard III usurps the crown Ac
203
A plot for placing Henry Tudor on the throne
207
Battle of Bos worthfield Death of Richard III
208
Amusements ChristmasDress
210
End of the line of Plantagenet AcRise of the commons
213
Henry VII Lambert Simnel Death of Lord Lovel
215
A new impostor Adventures of Perkin Warbeck
217
Conclusion of the story of Perkin Warbeck Ac
218
Architecture of Henry VII s time Discoveries
220
CXXIIDeath of Henry VII The Star Chamber
223
Henry VIII Rise of Wolsey
224
CXX1V More about Cardinal Wolsey
227
Henry invades France Battle of the Spurs Battle of Flodden Field Charles V visits England
228
Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn Thomas Cranmer Disgrace and death of Wolsey
230
Heurv VIII marries Anne Boleyn Sir Thomas More Death of Anne Boleyn
233
Thomas Cromwell The kings marriages
236
Henry VIII very zealous against heretics
237
The Bible translated into English Ignoranco of the people
238
War between England and Scotland Death of Henry VIII
240
Anecdotes of Henry VIII Ac
242
The Duke of Somerset appointed Protector Religious matters
244
Edward and Mary Ac Dudley
246
Suppression of the religions houses Warwick rules the country
247
The religious houses Fashious of dress Ac
248
Lady Jane Grey Ac
250
The manners of Queen Marys time The houses of the nobles Some particulars of the mode of housekeeping
253
Manners of the English Commerce
255
Queen Mary Ac Execution of Lady Jane Grey
257
Persecution of the Protestants
260
CXUIWar with France Battle of St Quentin The English lose Calais Death of Mary
262
Elizabeth proclaimed queen The Reformed faith restored Prosper ous state of the kingdom
263
Elizabeths court Robert Dudley
265
Elizabeths costume The Queen of Scots
266
Continuation of the Story of Mary
268
Continuation of the Story of Mary
269
Elizabeth detains Mary as a prisoner Ac
271
A new plot in favor of Mary is detected Mary is put to death
273
The Invincible Armada Elizabeth and her subjects
275
Sir Walter Raleigh Virginia settled The Earl of Essex
277
rDress in the time of Elizabeth
279
Queen Elizabeths progresses Ac
280
Death of Lord Burleigh Lord Essex and Elizabeth
282
Execution of Essex Death of Elizabeth
283
Character and anecdotes of Elizabeth Spenser
285
James I and his court Sir Walter Raleigh introduces tobacco and potatoes
286
Conspiracy to place Arabella Stuart on the throne Sir Walter Raleigh
288
The Gunpowder Plot
290
Prince Henry Condition of the people Ac
293
Anecdotes of James I The Bible translated Coaches introduced
295
Charles it tried tor high treason His execution
318
The Revolution of 1688 William and Mary called to the throne
356

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Seite 276 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Seite 313 - I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled, for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor. His linen was plain, and' not very clean ; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar. His hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side, his countenance swollen and reddish, his voice sharp and untunable, and his eloquence full of fervour.
Seite 320 - Mark, child! what I say: They will cut off my head! and perhaps make thee a king: But mark what I say, thou must not be a king, as long as thy brothers Charles and James are alive. They will cut off thy brothers' heads, when they can catch them! And thy head too they will cut off at last! Therefore, I charge thee, do not be made a king by them!
Seite 342 - The noise and cracking and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking of women and children...
Seite 12 - On this question of principle, while actual suffering was yet afar off, they raised their flag against a power, to which, for purposes of foreign conquest and subjugation, Rome, in the height of her glory, is not to be compared ; a power which has dotted over the surface of the whole globe with her possessions and military posts, whose morning drum-beat, following the sun, and keeping company with the hours, circles the earth with one continuous and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England.
Seite 295 - Good Mr. Jowler, we pray you speak to the King (for he hears you every day, and so doth he not us) that it will please his Majesty to go back to London, for else the country will be undone ; all our provision is spent already, and we are not able to entertain him longer.
Seite 287 - King James was wont to be very earnest with the country gentlemen to go from London to their country houses. And sometimes he would say thus to them, "Gentlemen, at London you are like ships at sea, which show like nothing; but in your country villages you are like ships in a river, which look like great things.
Seite 243 - It was not till the end of this reign that any salads, carrots, turnips, or other edible roots, were produced in England. The little of these vegetables that was used was formerly imported from Holland and Flanders". Queen Catherine, when she wanted a salad, was obliged to despatch a messenger thither on purpose.
Seite 259 - Guilford, desired permission to see her ; but she refused her consent, and sent him word, that the tenderness of their parting would overcome the fortitude of both, and would too much unbend their minds from that constancy which their approaching end required of them.
Seite 242 - Ho! man: will they not suffer my bill to pass?" And laying his hand on Montague's head, who was then on his knees before him, "Get my bill passed by to-morrow, or else to-morrow this head of yours shall be off.

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