Clubs and Club Life in London: With Anecdotes of Its Famous Coffee Houses, Hostelries, and Taverns, from the Seventeenth Century to the Present Time

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John Camden Hotten, 1872 - 544 Seiten
 

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Seite 38 - Wharton, the scorn and wonder of our days, Whose ruling passion was the lust of praise: Born with whate'er could win it from the wise, Women and fools must like him or he dies; Though wondering senates hung on all he spoke, The club must hail him master of the joke.
Seite 316 - In Covent Garden to-night, going to fetch home my wife, I stopped at the great Coffee-house ' there, where I never was before; where Dryden the poet (I knew at Cambridge), and all the wits of the town, and Harris the player, and Mr. Hoole of our College. And had I had time then, or could at other times, it will be good coming thither, for there, I perceive, is very witty and pleasant discourse.
Seite 184 - Beauclerk and the beaming smile of Garrick, Gibbon tapping his snuff-box and Sir Joshua with his trumpet in his ear. In the foreground is that strange figure which is as familiar to us as the figures of those among whom we have been brought up, the gigantic body, the huge massy face, seamed with the scars of disease, the brown coat, the black worsted stockings, the gray wig with the scorched foretop, the dirty hands, the nails bitten and pared to the quick.
Seite 72 - The young men of the age lose five, ten, fifteen thousand pounds in an evening there. Lord Stavordale,* not one-and-twenty, lost eleven thousand there, last Tuesday, but recovered it by one great hand at hazard : he swore a great oath,—" Now, if I had been playing deep, I might have won millions.
Seite 318 - This place is very much altered since Mr. Dry•den frequented it, where you used to see songs, epigrams, and satires, in the hands of every man you met, you have now only a pack of cards; and instead of the cavils about the turn of the expression, the elegance of the style, and the like, the learned now dispute only about the truth of the game.
Seite 9 - I saw you; for wit is like a rest Held up at tennis, which men do the best With the best gamesters. What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid I heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one (from whence they came) Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life...
Seite 177 - Johnson was not the less ready to love Mr. Langton, for his being of a very ancient family; for I have heard him say, with pleasure, "Langton, Sir, has a grant of free warren from Henry the Second; and Cardinal Stephen Langton, in King John's reign, was of this family.
Seite 178 - I think I shall be of you." When Sir Joshua mentioned this to Dr. Johnson, he was much displeased with the actor's conceit. "He'll be of us, (said Johnson) How does he know we will permit him? The first Duke in England has no right to hold such language.
Seite 104 - For what is Nature ? Ring her changes round, Her three flat notes are water, plants, and ground; Prolong the peal, yet spite of all your clatter, The tedious chime is still ground, plants, and water.
Seite 6 - MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an instance of it, we may observe, that we take all occasions and pretences of forming ourselves into those little nocturnal assemblies which are commonly known by the name of Clubs.

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