History of England and France Under the House of Lancaster: With an Introductory View of the Early Reformation

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Seite 414 - In reply, the king granted that " from henceforth nothing be . enacted to the petitions of his commons that be contrary to their asking, whereby they should be bound without their assent...
Seite 410 - You would then have seen pillagers, active to do mischief, running through the town, slaying men, women and children, according to their orders. It was a most melancholy business; for all ranks, ages and sexes cast themselves on their knees before the prince, begging for mercy; but he was so inflamed with passion and revenge that he listened to none...
Seite 357 - drawen children fro Christ's religion into their private " order by hypocrisie, lesings, and steling. For they " tellen that their order is more holy than any other ; " that they shullen have higher degree in the bliss of " heaven than other men that been not therein ; and " seyn, that men of their order shullen never come to " hell, but shullen dome other men with Christ at
Seite 74 - ... into hell with themselves. For Christ saith plainly unto you, ' If one blind man leadeth another, they are like both to fall into the ditch...
Seite 28 - The opinions which they maintained even assumed a bolder form after Wycliffe's decease. They denied that there had been any Pope whose title to the office was valid since Sylvester in the fourth century. All indulgences they utterly rejected as corruption; confession and absolution they regarded as sinful, and even impious ; pilgrimages, the invocation of saints, the keeping of saints' days, the use of images in worship, they plainly treated as various forms of idolatry ; all Church dignities, from...
Seite 26 - Zuinglius, who had cost off errors of Romanism to which himself still adhered. The courage that inspired both reformers to break loose from the papacy, supported them in sustaining long continued conflicts with the secular arm. But Wycliffe, though he never made any recantation, yet showed a disposition to reconcile his doctrines with those of orthodox believers when he was abandoned by his patron, Lancaster ; whereas Luther never betrayed the least desire to soften the shades of his dissent: a merit...
Seite 27 - Koieirhal easier by the advantage which he enjoved above ui pndtteMor, of steady support from the Elector of Saxony. The temporal lot of the two men differed accordingly. Luther gave up all preferment, and indeed surrendered entirely his station in the Church which he opposed. Wycliffe retained both his parochial and cathedral benefices to the end of his life. In their private character both were without a stain : the sanctity of their lives attested the purity of their doctrine. The utmost rancour...
Seite 328 - VII., they blindly followed the dictates of the faction which had the upper-hand — the prince whose success in the field had defeated his competitors, the powerful chief whose authority prevailed at the moment. The history of their proceedings is a succession of contrary decisions on the same question, conflicting laws on the same title, attainders and reversals, consigning one day all the adherents of one party to confiscation and...
Seite 357 - Chil" dren fro fader and moder, sometime such as ben unable " to the Order, and sometime such as shullen susteyn their "fader and moder by the commandment of God; and " thus they ben blasphemers takin upon full councel in " * douty things that ben not expressly commanded ne far- * doubtful.
Seite 328 - ... the field had defeated his competitors, the powerful chief whose authority prevailed at the moment. The history of their proceedings is a succession of contrary decisions on the same question, conflicting laws on the same title, attainders and reversals, consigning one day all the adherents of one party to confiscation and the scaffold, reinstating them the next, and placing their adversaries in the same cruel predicament. Thus, in 1461, on Edward IV.'s victory, they unanimously attainted Henry...

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