Individuality and the Moral Aim in American Education: The Gilchrist Report Presented to the Victoria University, March, 1901

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Seite 184 - I believe that education is a regulation of the process of coming to share in the social consciousness; and that the adjustment of individual activity on the basis of this social consciousness is the only sure method of social reconstruction.
Seite 266 - ... shall continue to be appropriated and shall be known as school library moneys and shall be applied to the purchase of books for the formation or extension of common school libraries, and for the necessary expenses of a state school library for the benefit and free use of the teachers of this state, to be circulated under such rules and regulations as the state superintendent of public instruction may establish.
Seite 116 - The introduction of active occupations, of nature study, of elementary science, of art, of history ; the relegation of the merely symbolic and formal to a secondary position ; the change in the moral school atmosphere, in the relation of pupils and teachers — of discipline ; the introduction of more active, expressive, and self-directing factors — all these are not mere accidents, they are necessities of the larger social evolution.
Seite 28 - ... non-residents. The general policy of the city in regard to destitute, neglected, and wayward children is to send them to institutions under private control, paying a per capita allowance, usually $2 per week, for their support. There are twenty-five such institutions located in, or receiving children fr-om, the former city of New York, now the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. In these institutions the city supports an average number of about 15,000 children, paying for their support a total...
Seite 172 - ... step aside from the prescribed school work. My school work was not adjusted to botany at nine years because I played with an herbarium, and at twelve to physics because I indulged in noises with home-made electric bells, and at fifteen to Arabic, an elective which I miss still in several high schools, even in Brookline and Roxbury. The more my friends and I wandered afield with our little superficial interests and talents and passions, the more was the straightforward earnestness of the school...
Seite 235 - It is the glory of higher education that it lays chief stress on the comparative method of study; that it makes philosophy its leading discipline; that it gives an ethical bent to all of its branches of study. Higher education seeks as its first goal the unity of human learning. Then in its second stage it specializes. It first studies each branch in the light of all others. It studies each branch in its history. A...
Seite 115 - The obvious fact is that our social life has undergone a thorough and radical change. If our education is to have any meaning for life, it must pass through an equally complete transformation. This transformation is not something to appear suddenly, to be executed in a day by conscious purpose. It is already in progress. Those modifications of our school system which often appear (even to those most actively concerned with them, to say nothing of their spectators) to be...
Seite 184 - This conception has due regard for both the individualistic and socialistic ideals. It is duly individual because it recognizes the formation of a certain character as the only genuine basis of right living. It is socialistic because it recognizes that this right character is not to be formed by merely individual precept, example, or exhortation, but rather by the influence of a certain form of institutional or community life upon the individual, and that the social organism through the school, as...
Seite 18 - ... contact, so that each learns something from the experience of all the others. In this way teachers and supervisors become better acquainted, gather fresh courage and new inspiration, and go home feeling that they have much in common, and that, if they will, they can in many ways be mutually helpful. The most deadening influence about the country school is its isolation. Nothing is more potent in overcoming this than frequent gatherings in which teachers, school officers, and parents freely discuss...
Seite 237 - The student must penetrate the underlying fundamental principles of the world history in order to see how such different fruits have grown on the same tree of humanity. We must look to our universities and colleges for the people who have learned to understand the fashions and daily customs of a foreign people, and who have learned to connect the surface of their everyday life with the deep national principles and aspirations which mold and govern their individual and social action. Hence the significance...

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