Lectures and Addresses on Literary and Social Topics, Band 2

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Ticknor and Fields, 1859 - 318 Seiten
 

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Seite 152 - Memory and her siren daughters, but by devout prayer to that eternal Spirit, who can enrich with all utterance and knowledge, and sends out his seraphim, with the hallowed fire of his altar, to touch and purify the lips of whom he pleases...
Seite 6 - And immediately the angel of the Lord smote him, because he gave not God the glory ; and he was eaten of worms, and gave up the ghost.
Seite 9 - Then let us pray that come it may — As come it will for a...
Seite 157 - O, it is excellent To have a giant's strength ; but it is tyrannous To use it like a giant.
Seite 264 - Roused though it be full often to a mood Which spurns the check of salutary bands, That this most famous Stream in bogs and sands Should perish; and to evil and to good Be lost forever.
Seite 172 - Come, seeling night, Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day ; And with thy bloody and invisible hand Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond "Which keeps me pale...
Seite 177 - May-time's brightest, loveliest dawn ; A dancing shape, an image gay, To haunt, to startle, and waylay. " I saw her upon nearer view, A spirit, yet a woman too...
Seite 214 - Saviour comes ! by ancient bards foretold ! Hear Him, ye deaf; and all ye blind, behold ! He from thick films shall purge the visual ray, And on the sightless eyeball pour the day: 'Tis he the obstructed paths of sound shall clear, And bid new music charm th' unfolding ear: The dumb shall sing, the lame his crutch forego, And leap exulting, like the bounding roe.
Seite 177 - A countenance in which did meet Sweet records, promises as sweet; A creature not too bright or good For human nature's daily food, For transient sorrows, simple wiles, Praise, blame, love, kisses, tears, and smiles.
Seite 198 - Tell me not, Sweet, I am unkind That from the nunnery Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind, To war and arms I fly. True, a new mistress now I chase, The first foe in the field; And with a stronger faith embrace A sword, a horse, a shield. Yet this inconstancy is such As you too shall adore; I could not love thee, dear, so much, Loved I not honour more.

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