The History of England from the Accession of James the Second

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1849
 

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Inhalt

Perfidy of Jeffreys
66
Decline of Rochesters Influence
73
The Dispensing Power O
80
The Deanery of Christchurch given to a Roman Catholic
87
Proceedings against the Bishop of London
96
Samuel Johnson
103
The Roman Catholic Divines overmatched
109
Favour shown to the Roman Catholic Religion in Scotland
115
Their Negotiations with the King Meeting of the Scotch
118
Ireland
125
Course which James ought to have followed
132
His Mortifications Panic among the Colonists
138
He is bent on the Repeal of the Act of Settlement he returns
144
Dismission of Rochester
153
CHAPTER VII
160
His Love of Danger his bad Health Coldness of his Manners
167
Gilbert Burnet
173
Relations between William and English Parties
179
His Policy consistent throughout
185
William becomes the Head of the English Opposition
190
Dryden
196
Partial Toleration granted in Scotland
205
Feeling of the Protestant Dissenters
211
Letter to a Dissenter
217
The Majority of the Puritans are against the Court Baxter
223
The Prince and Princess of Orange hostile to the Declaration
231
Enmity of James to Burnet
240
Halifax Devonshire
246
Lady Churchill and the Princess Anne
253
Influence of the Dutch Press
260
The Duke of Somerset
269
Proceedings against the University of Cambridge
276
Magdalene College Oxford
283
The Fellows of Magdalene cited before the High Commission
289
Penn attempts to mediate
295
Magdalene College turned into a Popish Seminary
302
The Queen pregnant general Incredulity
308
The Board of Regulators
315
Questions put to the Magistrates
323
Character of the Roman Catholic Country Gentlemen
329
Change in the Opinion of the Tories concerning the Lawfulness
400
Conduct of Mary
407
Conduct of James after the Trial of the Bishops
413
Discontent of the Gentry
419
Lillibullero
428
Errors of the French King
432
He receives numerous Assurances of Support from England
438
Anxiety of William Warnings conveyed to James
444
The French Armies invade Germany
450
James roused to a Sense of his Danger his Naval Means
458
Proofs of the Birth of the Prince of Wales submitted to
466
His Declaration arrives in England James questions the Lords
472
He lands at Torbay
478
Conversation of the King with the Bishops
489
Colchester Abingdon
495
The King goes to Salisbury
503
Skirmish at Wincanton
509
Council of Lords held by James
517
Dartmouth refuses to send the Prince of Wales into France
525
Clarendon joins the Prince at Salisbury Dissension in
531
Negotiation
542
CHAPTER X
549
The Spanish Ambassadors House sacked
555
The King detained near Sheerness
563
Williams Embarrassment
570
The Dutch Troops occupy Whitehall
577
He calls together the Lords and the Members of the Parliaments
584
Debates and Resolutions of the Commoners summoned by
590
Reception of the Queen of England in France
596
Arrival of James at Saint Germains
598
State of Parties in England
606
Danbys Plan
612
Choice of a Speaker
618
It is sent up to the Lords Debate in the Lords on the Plan
625
Schism between the Whigs and the Followers of Danby
633
Letter of James to the Convention
639
The Conference between the Houses
645
The Declaration of Right
651
Treaty of Augsburg 189
679

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Seite 435 - Some trust in chariots, and some in horses : but we will remember the name of the LORD our God.
Seite 375 - I am sure to be half ruined. If I say Not Guilty, I shall brew no more for the King; and if I say Guilty, I shall brew no more for anybody else." The trial then commenced, a trial which, even when coolly perused after the lapse of more than a century and a half, has all the interest of a drama. The advocates contended on both sides with far more than professional keenness and vehemence; the audience listened with as much anxiety as if the fate...

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