Montaigne's Essays in Three Books: With Notes and Quotations. And an Account of the Author's Life. With a Short Character of the Author and Translator, Band 2

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Seite 228 - Because that, when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful, but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened : professing themselves to be wise, they became fools. And changed the glory of the uncorruptible God into an image made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and fourfooted beasts, and creeping things.
Seite 214 - Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man the things that God hath prepared for them that love him.
Seite 341 - To what do Caesar and Alexander owe the infinite grandeur of their renown, but to fortune? How many men has she extinguished in the beginning of their progress, of whom we have no knowledge; who brought as much courage to the work as they, if their adverse hap had not cut them off in the first sally of their arms? Amongst so many and so great dangers, I do not remember...
Seite 53 - No one since has followed the track: 'tis a rugged road, more so than it seems, to follow a pace so rambling and uncertain, as that of the soul; to penetrate the dark profundities of its intricate internal windings; to choose and lay hold of so many little nimble motions; 'tis a new and extraordinary undertaking, and that withdraws us from the common and most recommended employments of the world.
Seite 345 - I care not so much what I am in the opinion of others, as what I am in my own ; I would be rich of myself, and not by borrowing.
Seite 192 - Where is the Wife? Where is the Scribe? Where is the Difputer of this World?
Seite 390 - I have no more made my book than my book has made me— a book consubstantial with its author, concerned with my own self, an integral part of my life; not concerned with some third-hand, extraneous purpose, like all other books.
Seite 88 - I do not bite my nails about the difficulties I meet with in my reading; after a charge or two, I give them over. Should I insist upon them, I should both lose myself and time ; for I have an impatient understanding, that must be satisfied at first : what I do not discern at once, is by persistence rendered more obscure.
Seite 229 - Has your nation," said he to them, "the power to make gods of whom they please? Pray first deify some one amongst yourselves, and when I see what advantage he has by it, I will thank you for your offer.
Seite 341 - He is often surprised between the hedge and the ditch ; he must run the hazard of his life against a henroost ; he must dislodge four rascally musketeers out of a barn ; he must prick out single from his party, as necessity arises, and meet adventures alone.

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