Anecdotes, Observations, and Characters, of Books and Men

Cover
J. R. Smith, 1858 - 396 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 190 - THE Muse," disgusted at an age and clime Barren of every glorious theme, In distant lands now waits a better time, Producing subjects worthy fame ; — In happy climes, where, from the genial sun And virgin earth, such scenes ensue, The force of art by nature seems outdone, And fancied beauties by the true ; — In happy climes, the seat of innocence, Where nature guides and virtue rules ; Where men shall not impose, for truth and sense, The pedantry
Seite 40 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Seite 41 - Wise men have said are wearisome; who reads Incessantly, and to his reading brings not A spirit and judgment equal or superior (And what he brings, what needs he elsewhere seek) Uncertain and unsettled still remains, Deep versed in books and shallow in himself, Crude or intoxicate, collecting toys, And trifles for choice matters, worth a sponge; As children gathering pebbles on the shore.
Seite 111 - I assured him, that I did not at all take it ill of Mr. Tickell that he was going to publish his translation; that he certainly had as much right to translate any author as myself; and that publishing both was entering on a fair stage.
Seite 176 - In vain fair Thames reflects the double scenes Of hanging mountains, and of sloping greens ; Joy lives not here, to happier seats it flies, And only dwells where Wortley casts her eyes. What are the gay parterre, the...
Seite 120 - Argyle, who sat in the next box to us, say ' It will do — it must do ! I see it in the eyes of them.
Seite 279 - you have the honour of seeing the two greatest men in the world." — "I don't know how great men you may be," said the Guinea man, "but I don't like your looks. I have often bought a man much better than both of you, all muscles and bones, for ten guineas.
Seite 286 - Lord Stanhope, then (now Lord Chesterfield), Lord Herbert, &c., were members. Epigrams were proposed to be written on the glasses, by each member after dinner ; once, when Dr. Young was invited thither, the Doctor would have declined writing, because he had no diamond : Lord Stanhope lent him his, and he wrote immediately — Accept a miracle, instead of wit ; See two dull lines with Stanhope's pencil writ.
Seite 120 - He began on it ; and when first he mentioned it to Swift, the Doctor did not much like the project. As he carried it on, he showed what he wrote to both of us, and we now and then gave a correction, or a word or two of advice ; but it was wholly of his own writing. When it was done, neither of us thought it would succeed. We showed it to Congreve ; who, after reading it over, said, it would either take greatly, or be damned confoundedly.
Seite 223 - He observed how well that would hit my case, if I were to imitate it in English. After he was gone, I read it over, translated it in a morning or two, and sent it to the press in a week or fortnight after.

Bibliografische Informationen