The Life of Andrew Marvell, the Celebrated Patriot: With Extracts and Selections from His Prose and Poetical Works

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Simpkin and Marshall, 1832 - 116 Seiten
 

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Seite 99 - Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found ; Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song : then worms shall try That long-preserv'd virginity : And your quaint honour turn to dust ; And into ashes all my lust. The grave's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.
Seite 99 - But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart; For, Lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. But at my back I always hear Time's winged chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity.
Seite 98 - Had we but world enough, and time This coyness, lady, were no crime. We would sit down and think which way To walk, and pass our long love's day. Thou by the Indian Ganges...
Seite 90 - He makes the figs our mouths to meet And throws the melons at our feet; But apples plants of such a price, No tree could ever bear them twice.
Seite 87 - It is a wondrous thing how fleet 'Twas on those little silver feet; "With what a pretty skipping grace It oft would challenge me...
Seite 90 - Thus sung they, in the English boat, An holy and a cheerful note ; And all the way, to guide their chime, With falling oars they kept the time.
Seite 87 - But Sylvio soon had me beguiled: This waxed tame, while he grew wild, And quite regardless of my smart, Left me his Fawn, but took his Heart. Thenceforth I set myself to play My solitary time away With this, and very well content Could so mine idle life have spent.
Seite 91 - Which, stretcht upright, impales me so, That mine own Precipice I go; And warms and moves this needless...
Seite 99 - Let us roll all our strength and all Our sweetness up into one ball, And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life.
Seite 63 - An Account of the Growth of Popery and arbitrary Government in England...

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