Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

Tables for finding the Rising and Setting of the Sun, Moon, and Planets.

TABLE I.
Argument Declination of the Sun, the Moon, or a Planet.

[blocks in formation]

35

11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

TABLE III.
Argument Sum of the Numbers in Tables 1 and 2.
Rises if Dec. S. Sets.

Rises if Dec, S. Sets.
VI. 5 = 834 = v. 55

VIII. 0 = 970 IV. 0 10 = 864 50 5 = 971

55 15 = 882 45 10 = 973

50 20 894 40 15 = 974

45 25 = 904 35 20 = 976

40
30 = 912
30

25 = 977
S5 = 918
25
30 = 978

30
40 924
20
35 = 980

25 45 = 929 15 40 = 981

20 50 = 934 10 45 = 982

15 55 = 938

5
50 = 983

10 55 = 984

5 VII. O 941 v. O

IX, 0 = 985 = III. O 5 = 945 = IV. 55

5 = 986 = II. 55 10 948 50 10 = 987

50 15 = 951 45 15 = 988

50 20 953 40 20 = 988

45 25 956 35 25 989

40 30 958 30 30 990

35
35 = 961
25

35 991
40 = 963
20
40 991

25
45 = 965
15
45 992

20 50 = 966

50 = 993

15 *55 = 968

5
55 = 994

10 Sets if Dec. N. Rises.

Sets if Dec. N. Rises.

| 11 || | || | || | || || ||

30

[ocr errors]

10

, The Use of the foregoing Tables explained.—Take out of Table 1 the number against Sun's Declination, and out of Table 2 the number against the Latitude of the place; add them together, and enter Table 3 with their Sum, against which you will find the time of rising and setting.

Example 1. Required the time when the Sun rises and sets on the 29th February next at London.

Sun's Declination S.7o. 52'. N° in Table 1 =914
Latitude of London 51. 33. N° in Table 2 = 10

[blocks in formation]

Enter Table iï, and against it you will find

Rises at vi. 40. Sets at v. 20. These Tables will also serve to show the time of the rising and setting of a Planet, or of the Moon nearly, by adding the time of rising and setting found as if for the Sun to the time of the Moon or Planet passing the Meridian.

Example 2. On the 1st January next the Sun will pass the Meridian at ix. 11. P. M. Dec. 23•. 28'. N. when will he rise and set at York?

4. Dec. N. 239, 28'. No Tab. 13964
Lat. of York, 53. 58. No Tab. 2= 14

O rises

O sets 97801. 30

VIII. 30

[blocks in formation]

2. rises 1.41 4 sets 5. 41 Example 3. On the 19th January next the Moon will pass the Meridian of London at 1. 34. A.M. Dec. 11°. 47'. N. when will she rise and set at London?

( Dec. N. ... 11.. 47'. No Tab. 13932
Lat. of London 51. 33. N° Tab. 2= 10

O rises O sets
942-IV. 59 VII. 1

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

Table of the Equation of Time for every Fifth Day of July.

M. S. July 1st, to the time by the Dial add 3 15 6th,

4 11 11th,

4 59 16th,

5 35 21st,

5 58 26th,

6 8 31st,

6 3 We have inserted at the end of each month the above Table of the Equation as applying to 1823, &c. leaving the reader to make the trilling calculation of difference for each

year. The following Table will show nearly the fluctuation of the Equation.

Tuhle of Equation of Time on July 31. In 1812 leap year = 6'. 1". 7. In 1816 leap year= 6'. 0". 7. 1813.... = 5. 59. 8.

1817 ... = 6. 0. 4. 1814. 6. 1. 3.

1818

= 6. 1. 2. 1815. 6. 1. 7. 1819

6. 4. 2. In the following Table the reader may compare the equation for July and August during three several years.

[blocks in formation]

29

26

28

1 3 5 7 9 11 1S 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31

8' fa. 17" 5' fa. 58" 3' fa. 21" 5' fa. 58" 3' fa. 15" 6' fa. O"
3 40 5 51 3 44 5 51 3 38 5 53
4 2 5 41 4 6 5 40 4 0 5 44
22 5

4
5

21

5 32 4 42 5 14

45 5 12 4 41 5 17 4 59 57 5

4 55 4 59 5 1
5 15

33 5 17 4 35 5. 15 42
5 28
16 5 30

13 5 29 4 20
5

3

52 5 42 S 49 5 41 3 57
5 50 S 26 5 51 3 23 5 51 3 31
5 57 2 59 5 58 2 55 5 59 3 4
6 2 2 27 6 4 2 25 6 4 2 34
6 6 1 58 6 6 1 54 6 7 2 3
6 6 1 25 6 7 1 21 6 8 1 30
5
51 6 6 0 46 6 7

56
6 1
15 6 1 0 10 6 3

20

40

By these Tables the reader will be satisfied that for all common purposes, the Tables we have inserted at the end of each month will serve for many years to come.

How to set a Clock or Watch by this Table : - For example, Jan.the 1st we find, by looking into the Table, that a Clock to be right must be 3 minutes 42 seconds faster than a Sun Dial; therefore we set it so much faster accordingly. And so of the rest. Twelve o'clock is the best time to set a Clock or a Watch by a Dial.

Observe--a Sun Dial shows solar or apparent time ; but a Clock and a Watch should be set to equal or mean time, as the Table directs, to go true.

AUGUST. AUGUSTMONAT. CEREALIS.

August ]. ST. PETER AD VINCULA. The Seven

Machabees with their Mother Martyrs. SS. Faith,
Hope, and Charity, Virgins and Martyrs. St.
Ethelwold of Winchester, B. C. St. Pellegrini
Hermit. Lammas Day.

O rises at rv. 18. and sets at vii. 42.
CHRONOLOGY.-Columbus discovered America in 1498.
Henry III. of France murdered at St. Cloud in 1589.
Battle of Prince Ferdinand at Minden in 1759.

It is well known that the chains, prisons, and implements of torture of many Saints, were often their greatest glory, as they served to prove their stedfastness in the true faith, and were consequently to be regarded as affording a means for proving the sanctity of their doctrine. Various cures are also related as being made by means of these instruments of the confinement and torture of the Saints. Thus, for example, miracles were wrought by the chains of St. Peter; and hence the origin of the festival of that day. See Butler's Lives of the Saints, vol. viii. p. 1.

The term Lammas Day is a corruption of Loafmass, and is a remnant of a very ancient British custom of celebrating the gifts of Ceres, or the frumentous produce of the Earth; whence Bread is made, and human life supported. As, however, there are different accounts of this name, we shall subjoin a few authorities, and some account of the customs and antiquities of the day. We extract the following account from Brande's Popular Antiquities :

On Lammas Day, or the Gule of August.- Dr. Pettingal, in the second volume of the Archaeologia, p. 67, derives “ Gule” from the Celtic or British “ Wyl,” or Gwyl,” signifying a festival or holiday, and explains “Gule of August” to mean no more than the holiday of St. Peter ad Vincula in August, when the people of England under popery paid their Peter pence.

This is confirmed by Blount, who tells us that Lammas Day, the first of August, otherwise called the Gule, or Yule of August, may be a corruption of the British words “ Gwyl Awst," signifying the Feast of August. He adds, indeed, “or it may come from Vincula, chains; that day being called in Latin Festum Sancti Petri ad Vincula."

Gebelin, in his Allegories Orientales, tells us, that as the month of August was the first in the Egyptian year, the first day of it was called Gule, which being Latinized makes Gula. "Our legendaries, surprised at seeing this word at the head of the month of August, did not overlook, but converted it to their own purpose. They made out of it the Feast of the daughter of the Tribune Quirinus, cured of some disorder in Gula, the throat, by kissing the chains of St. Peter, whose feast is solemnized on this day.

“ Comme le mois d'Août étoit le premier mois de l'année Egyptienne, on en appella le premier jour Gule : ce mot Latinisé fit Gula. Nos légendaires, surpris de voir ce nom à la tête du mois d'Août, ne s'oublièrent pas : ils en firent la Fête de la Fille du Tribun Quirinus, guérie d'un mal de gorge en baisant les Liens de Saint Pierre dont on célèbre la Fête ce jour-là.'

So also Sir Henry Spelman. “Gula Augusti saepe obvenit in membranis antiquis praesertim forensibus pro festo S. Petri ad Vincula : quod in ipsis calendis Augusti celebratur. Occasionem inter alias Durandus suggerit lib. vii. cap. 19. Quirinum Tribunum filiam habuisse gutturosam : quae osculata, iussu Alexandri Papae (a B. Petro sexti) vincula quibus Petrus sub Nerone coercitus fuerat, a morbo liberatur.”

Gebelin's etymon of the word will hereafter be considered under Yule as formerly used to signify Christmas.

“ Lammass Day, in the Salisbury Manuals, is called Benedictio novorum fructuum ;' in the Red Book of Derby, hlaf maesse daez; see also Oros. Interp. 1. 6. c. 19. But in the Sax. Chron. p. 138, A. D. 1009, it is hlam maesse. Mass was a word for festival : hence our way of naming the festivals of Christmass, Candlemass, Martinmass, &c. Instead, therefore, of Lammass quasi Lamb masse, from the offering of the tenants at York, may we not rather suppose the F to have been left out in course of time from general use, and La-mass, or hla maesse, will appear ?" Gent. Mag. Jan. 1799, p. 33.

Ceres. --The rich glow of the yellow and ripened Corn which increases through the last weeks of July, is now in perfection, and gives the country a pleasing look of plenty. Burns, the Scotch poet, has elegantly expressed the appearances of a fine evening among ripe Corn in this season.

Song, Laminas Night.
Tune, • Corn Rigs are bonnie.'
It was upon a Lammas night,

When Corn rigs are bonnie,
Beneath the Moon's unclouded light,

I held awa to Annie :

« ZurückWeiter »