The Old Manor-house: A Novel ...

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Seite 30 - Fair laughs the Morn, and soft the zephyr blows, While proudly riding o'er the azure realm In gallant trim the gilded vessel goes: Youth on the prow, and Pleasure at the helm: Regardless of the sweeping whirlwind's sway, That hush'd in grim repose expects his evening prey.
Seite 83 - ... is the hamlet now, and faintly gleam The dying embers from the casement low Of the thatch'd cottage ; while the moon's wan beam Lends a new lustre to the dazzling snow — O'er the cold waste, amid the freezing night, Scarce heeding whither, desolate I stray ; For me, pale eye of evening, thy soft light Leads to no happy home ; my weary way Ends but in sad vicissitudes of care : I only fly from doubt — to meet despair ! CHARLOTTE SMITH.
Seite 83 - Hush'd is the hamlet now, and faintly gleam The dying embers, from the casement low Of the thatch'd cottage ; while the Moon's wan beam Lends a new lustre to the dazzling snow — O'er the cold waste, amid the freezing night, Scarce heeding whither, desolate I stray ; For me, pale Eye of Evening, thy soft...
Seite 42 - ... Also, upon his return from America, when Orlando travels to West Wolverton in search of his family and finds the family home sold, and his sisters and mother gone, he is invited inside by the new owner. The narrator describes: "Every object [Orlando] saw was a dagger to his heart. As Philip had sold to Stockton every thing as it remained at his father's death, a great part of the furniture was the same. Startled at every step he took by the recollection of some well-known object, he entered the...
Seite 103 - In The Old Manor House (1793), her best work, a part of the scene is laid in the northern United States and Canada. Here is her idea of spring in that region : " The forest in only a few hours after the severest weather, which had buried the whole country in snow, burst into bloom, and presented, beneath the tulip tree and the magnolia, a more brilliant variety of flowers than art can collect in the most cultivated European garden." " The following is a description of Canada on the banks of the St....
Seite 104 - ... brushwood; in others, by old beech and oaks, whose roots wreathed about the bank, intermingled with ivy, holly, and evergreen fern, almost the only plants that appeared in a state of vegetation, unless the pale and sallow mistletoe, which here and there partially tinted with green the old trees above them. The tufts of trees and thick underwood now became more frequent; and though it was a fine clear evening, the winter sun, almost sunk beneath the horizon, lent only pale and cold rays among...
Seite 93 - ... good example of simultaneous hatred of war and sympathy for America. To these is added contempt for politicians in a final ironic soliloquy of Orlando, who sees a wounded veteran: yet perhaps [he] has been disabled from acquiring them [the necessaries of life] by having lost his limb in the service of what is called his country, that is, in fighting the battles of its politicians ; and having been deprived of his leg to preserve the balance of Europe, has not found in the usual asylum a place...
Seite 40 - Orlando anfwered incoherently that it was his father's houfe — that he came to look for his father. — The girl in terror left him; and, believing him either a madman or a robber, but rather the former, ran in to her miftrefs, and, carefully locking the kitchen door, informed her ihit there was a crazy man in the yard.
Seite 78 - Nonpareil disciple of documentation that she is, Mrs. Smith points the moral with a footnote: The perusal of the history of the American Revolution, of Ramsay, is humbly recommended to those Englishmen who doubt whether, in defence of their freedom, any other nation but their own will fight, or conquer.197 In her Young Philosopher (1798) she notes astonishing corollaries to American idealism. Glenmorris, taken to Boston for ransom by a piratical privateer, says of the New Englanders: . . . they were...
Seite 58 - But it's very well known that the greatest part of it will go into their pockets — and I cannot think for my share, and my husband he says the same, why a deuce Madam gave her money to them there parsons, when they always take care to have enough out of the farmers and poor men, let who will go without."™1 Mrs.

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