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TALES AND SKETCHES

FOR THE FIRESIDE,

BY

The Best Imerican Authors.

SELECTED FROM

PUTNAM'S MAGAZINE.

NEW-YORK:

A. DOWLING, 36 BEEKMAN STREET.

1857.

· 387

MISSION,

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Page.

Page.

IRVING'S LIFE OF WASHINGTON,

11 l'OPULAR SUPERSTITIONS AND BAL-

BIRDS,

7 IAD LITERATURE OF ENGLAND IN

WHAT CHEER ?

THE MIDDLE AGES,

378

Victor GALBRAITII,

25 NELLIE, WATCHING, .

PLANT-MUMMIES,

26 NOVELS, THEIR MEANING AND THEIR

RURAL, OBJECT; IN EUROPE AND AME-

389

RICA,

32 A DAY ON TH. DANUBE,

397

How I CAME TO LIKE DIAMONDS, 40 Famous QUARRIES OF TIIE WORLD, 404

Recent AMERICAN POETRY,

48 A TRIP FROM CHIHUAHUA TO THE SI-

SUMMER AND AUTUMN,

75 ERRA MADRE,

408

HORACE GREELEY,

16 A THANKSGIVING,

421

MR. PEPPERAGE'S FOURTII OF JULY

THE SHADOW,

421

ORATION,

91 CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF THE

One CRYSTAL PALACE,

121

Russian WAR,

422

TULOOM,

130 THE REPROOF-THE REPLY,

433

CURIOSITIES OF Puritan HISTORY, 132 THE EDITOR AT LARE,

434

LETTERS OF PAREPIDEMUS,

138 A YANKEE DIOGENES,

483

ACADIE AND THE BIRTH-PLACE OF TIIE FIRST DISCOVERERS OF AMERI-

EVANGELINE,

140

CA,

457

THE OLD MILL,

145 CUPID AND THE WASP,

. 470

THE ENCHANTED MULE,

147 RAMBLES OVER THE REALMS OF

SonNET,

VERBS AND SUBSTANTIVES,—-Ram-

KEEPING SCHOOL IN TEXAS,.

151 ble First,

472

LETTER FROM Hiram POWERS,

154 PLULALITY OF WORDS,

503

ACADEMIES AND UNIVERSITIES, 169 STORY OF AN OPERA SINGER,

512

REJECTED MSS.

180 COSAS DE ESPANA,

517

Russian DESPOTISM AND ITS VICTIMS, 182 AMERICAN DESPOTISMS,

524

ADVENTURES ON A DRIFT-LOG, 187 BATHING AND BODIES --A Disserta-

A

ON THE GOTHIC STYLE IN THE FINE

tion,

532

ARTS,

191 VESPERS,

536

VIRGINIA : PAST AND PRESENT, 195 THE THREE GANNETS,

536

THE TREE OF LIFE,

202 CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF THE

REMINISCENCES OF AN EX-JESUIT, 214 RUSSIAN War-Present and Fu-

VISIT TO A GOLD CHAIN MANUFAC-

ture,

537

TORY,

216 AT LAST,

550

EDITOR'S NOTES,

220 WATERING PLACE WORRIES,

551

NEW-YORK CHURCH ARCHITECTURE, 233 THE WINDHARP,

569

CURIOSITIES OF PURITAN HISTORY :

AUF WIEDERSEHEN,

570

-Witchcraft,

249 PALINODE,

570

SALT LAKE AND TIE NEW SARATOGA, 260 Count STEDINGK,

345, 492, 571

THE LOVERS,

269 THEART OF EATING,

581

STATISTICS AND SPECULATIONS CON- RAMBLES OVER

THE REALMS OF

CERNING THE Pacific RAILROAD, 270 VERBS AND SUBSTANTIVES—Ram-

THE DAY OWLS OF North AMERICA, 277 ble Second,

602

OUR NEW PRESIDENT,

301 IN THE LANE,

610

The MEDICAL PROFESSION,

315 AMERICAN WINES,

504, 611

The Doom OF WOULD-BE POETS,

318 LIVING IN THE COUNTRY,

619

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE

FORTY DAYS IN A WESTERN HOTEL, 622

ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 319 To my HERBARIUM, .

632

LONDON KNOCKINGS

324 Our PARTIES AND POLITICS-A South-

FROM THE SUMMER DIARY OF MINEP- erner's View of the Subject,

633

VA TATTLE,

330 TITBOTTOM's SPECTACLES,

. 649

THE PAINTER'S PORTFOLIO,.

357 MRS. MACSIMUM'S BILL,

660

361 | Power's GREEK SLAVE,

666

666

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AFRICAN PROVERBIAL Pullosophy, : 362 Sea,.

*** All the Articles enumerated in this Table are complete in this Volume.

PUTNAM'S MONTHLY.

A Magazine of Literature, Science,

and Art.

VOL. VI.-JULY, 1855.-NO. XXXI.

IRVING'S LIFE OF WASHINGTON.*

B

IOGRAPHY may be said to bear to modern times we have no heroes; but

history somewhat the same relation the reason, probably, is not so much that portraiture does to historical painting. that men or society are yet very differLike other comparisons, there are some ent from what they have been, as that points in which this one fails; but it is we have a different way of viewing exact enough for purposes of illustration. things-perceiving that to be accomThe great essential requisite for histori- plished by the united weight of many cal composition, as for historical paint- persons acting under a common impulse, ing, is the power of grouping. If there which, according to the old method of is a failure in this respect, skillfulness explanation, would have been regarded and elaboration in details, so far from as the heroic work of some single indimaking up for it, may only render con- vidual. fusion worse confounded, and the failure History, considered as a science, and more conspicuous. This power of group- historical compositions, looked upon as ing is, indeed, essential to every species demonstrations, have, no doubt, gained of composition, whether pictorial or much by this change. But, the great written; but a much less degree of it mass of the reading public are hardly will answer for biography or portraiture yet prepared for this journey into the than for compositions in history. Nor wilderness of historical speculation, even is this by any means the only advantage though the promised land of a reorganwhich the former possess. Though not ized and regenerated society may be ranked so high in the critic's scale, their alleged to lie beyond it; while fed merits and beauties and power of pleas- with this philosophical manna, they do ing are much more level to the common still look back with great longings and apprehension, and more likely to be some murmurings to the flesh- pots of generally felt and appreciated.

Egypt, breaking out into occasional History, as it becomes more compre- complaints that they have been led into hensive, more scientific and abstract, the desert to starve. giving more and more of its attention to

Hence, the popularity of that semirelations and causes not accidental, but historical species of biography, of which natural and necessary, comes to deal Washington Irving, in the volume beless and less with men as individu- fore us, has furnished the first installals, and to confine itself to those mo- ment of a very pleasing specimen. tives and impulses shared by groups Biography, indeed, in this shape of it, and masses in common-motives and may be said to have picked up not impulses to which, rather than to in- merely the dropped mantle, but, as it dividual peculiarities, the course and were, the cast-off body of the ascending order of events is every day more and muse of history; and, as yet, the great more traced. It is said that in these mass of readers seem much to prefer a

Life of George Washington. By WASHINGTON IRVING. New York: G. P. Putnam & Co. Three vols., Vol. I., pp. 504

VOL. VI.

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