The Oriental Herald, Band 11

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Seite 113 - And though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously by licensing and prohibiting to misdoubt her strength. Let her and Falsehood grapple; who ever knew Truth put to the worse in a free and open encounter?
Seite 309 - Oh lift me from the grass! I die, I faint, I fail! Let thy love in kisses rain On my lips and eyelids pale. My cheek is cold and white, alas ! My heart beats loud and fast: Oh! press it close to thine again, Where it will break at last.
Seite 183 - But if there be in glory aught of good, It may by means far different be attain'd, Without ambition, war, or violence; By deeds of peace, by wisdom eminent, By patience, temperance: I mention still Him, whom thy wrongs, with saintly patience borne.
Seite 183 - For honourable age is not that which standeth in length of time, nor that is measured by number of years. But wisdom is the gray hair unto men, and an unspotted life is old age.
Seite 507 - Joying to hear the birds' sweet harmony. Which therein shrouded from the tempest dread, Seem'd in their song to scorn the cruel sky. Much can they praise the trees so straight and high, The sailing pine, the cedar proud and tall...
Seite 317 - God has given me this dispensing power, and I will maintain it. I tell you, there are seven thousand men, and of the Church of England too, that have not bowed the knee to Baal.
Seite 159 - Many examples may be put of the force of custom, both upon mind and body ; therefore, since custom is the principal magistrate of man's life, let men by all means endeavour to obtain good customs. Certainly, custom is most perfect when it beginneth in young years: this we call education, which is, in effect, but an early custom.
Seite 172 - No prophet bards, thy glittering courts among, Wake the full lyre, and swell the tide of song : But lawless force, and meagre want are there, And the quick-darting eye of restless fear, While cold oblivion, 'mid thy ruins laid, Folds his dank wing beneath the ivy shade.
Seite 597 - If people should not be called to account for possessing the people with an ill opinion of the government, no government can subsist. For it is very necessary for all governments that the people should have a good opinion of it.
Seite 507 - A lovely Ladie rode him faire beside, Upon a lowly Asse more white than snow, Yet she much whiter ; but the same did hide Under a vele, that wimpled was full low...

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