Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

as well as pitiable-to witness the miserable ends in shoulders, came forward, and stood beside a dark object terment was gone through, and then, with mournful which the blind heaping up of wealth not unusually in the centre of the assemblage, which was covered farewell signs, the whole assemblage separated, each terminates. A life spent in the drudgery of the with dark cloth, being evidently a bier or coffin. apparently taking his own way,

M. de Montlouis stood in the mean time a little counting-house, warehouse, or factory, is exchanged “My friends," said this person, "I think we are all for the dignified ease of a suburban villa ; but what present. Peace be with you.” As these words were apart. At the close of the funeral rite, he was left a joyless seclusion it mostly proves ! Retirement uttered, one of the party, an attendant seemingly, alone with Mademoiselle Brunen. She came up to him, has been postponed until all the faculties of enjoy- went to the door by which Montlouis had entered, her eyes filled with tears. For a few minutes both ment have become effete or paralysed. Sans eyes, and locked it. “Now," thought the officer, who began were silent. “You have saved my life and honour, sans teeth, sans task, sans every thing, scarcely any to see clearly the nature of the meeting upon which sir," said she at length, but, I fear, at the cost, or inlet or pulsation remains for old, much loss new he had intruded himself so rashly, “ now I cannot at least the imminent risk, of your own.” “Speak not pleasures and associations. Nature is not to be won retreat if discovered, and may pay dearly for my folly.” of it, lady,” said Montlouis. "You have been witness by such superannuated suitors ; she is not intelligible He had not much time to indulge these meditations. to an assemblage," continued she, “ of our persecuted to them, and the language of fields and woods, of mur- The former speaker continued his address. “My Protestant brethren,* who, at great peril to themmuring brooks, mountain tops, and tumbling torrents, brethren,” said he, “ let us now offer up our prayers selves, have dared to perform the last rites to my facannot be understood by men familiar only with the for our friend Bertrand de Brunen, who has quitted ther, though he was a victim marked out by Cardinal noises of crowded streets, loaded vans, bustling taverns, this vale of tears, and whose virtuous dangliter, our Dubois and his creatures. I know not how you came and postmen's knocks. London and the chief pro- beloved sister, entreats”.

among us; but you have saved me from the power of vincial towns are environed with luckless pyrites of At this point, one of the attendants advanced to one who, under the pretext of converting me, had this description, who, dropped from their accustomed the clergyman, for such he evidently was, and whis previously endeavoured to tempt me to ruin. Whe sphere, become lumps of dross in a new element. pered a few words in his car. Instantly he turned his ther he had the regent's authority for his late attempt, Happily their race is mostly short ; death kindly eyes upon Montlouis, with a degree of evident sur I cannot say, but I know well that he is one whose comes to terminate their weariness, and, like plants prise and alarm. He attempted indeed to continue death will not be left unavenged by Dubois. You too late transplanted, they perish from the sudden his address, but his voice faltered, and his thoughts are lost, utterly lost, and I have been the unhappy change in long-established habits, air, and diet. were obviously occupied with another subject. The cause !"

We once more entreat our readers to believe, that confusion of the pastor soon extended to the whole Montlouis endeavoured to assure her of the causein these intimations it is not meant to disparage indus- assembly. They separated from Montlouis, and stared less nature of her fears, but he failed to make his try, application, or ambition. All that is intended is to on him with an expression at once of menace and dis- argument good. “There is one way," said the lady, caution against the folly of being so absorbed in the may. Seeing this, the officer resolved to disclose the hesitatingly, “there is—there appears to me but one means that the ends of exertion are forgotten. There truth. “Gentlemen,” said he, “ I am no spy. I give way in which you may be saved." The young officer is a laudable temperance in the acquisition of riches you my word of honour, I am not.” But there was conjectured the cause of her hesitation. « Dear lady," and honours, as well as in the use of liquids and solids. no change in the looks of the party. “I am Monsieur said he, "fortune appears to have thrown us strangely Above all, Mr Jefferson's observation on over-anxiety de Montlouis, continued the gnardsman, who, himself together, and to have united our fates at one decisive zegarding prospective calamities merits consideration. trained to respect his family name, believed that to blow. But, believo me, if, to relieve us from this exSome always meet evils half way, and live under con- others also it must convey an assurance of unblemished tremity, it be necessary to take steps which might stant apprehension of rain or foul weather, of disease honour in the bearer.

appear improper at another moment, believe me, I or poverty, political revolutions and national bank- What would have been the issue of this matter, it will not presume upon them.” “ You partly compreruptcy. Sufficient for the day are the evils thereof. is hard to say. But just as Montlouis was repeating hend me,” said Mademoiselle de Brunen, " but I will Let us wait at least till the symptoms are certain his assertion, a noise was heard, and from behind the speak plainly. It would be folly, as well as base inand definite. Apprehended misfortunes may not black veil already mentioned, a young female hastily gratitude, to permit the indulgence of ebildish feelings come at all, or come in a shape much less appalling issued. “Extinguish the lights,”

cried she in tones of at the cost of your life. I have passports for myself than that anticipated. A path will doubtless open as alarm ; " we are in danger ?" Montlouis was much and

servants to go to Holland. I have friends there. we advance, and, as the horizon recedes to the travel struck by the face and figure of this lady. Before her You must fly with me; it is our duty to recompense ler, difficulties will disappear, or become less in the request could be obeyed by those present, the noise you for all you have lost by me. You will find an reality than the imagination had conceived.

increased, loud knocks resounded on the outer door of asylum there." After a pause, she added, with a

the cave, and a voice exclaimed from without, “ Open, tremulous voice, “ You nust fly! If not, I too will A STORY OF THE ORLEANS REGENCY.

in the name of the king!". On hearing this summons, remain, for I could not live after having destroyed

a general exclamation of “we are betrayed !" came you!" In the early part of the reign of Louis XV., when the from the lips of the persons présent, and, snatching Need we tell the reader the issue? M. Montlouis government of France was entrusted to the Regent up the bier, most of them disappeared by a low pas- fled to Holland. A short time after these events, he Orleans, a young Breton gentleman named Montlouis, sage which had been previously unnoticed by Mont- was hung in effigy by the Cardinal Dubois's orders in the descendant of an ancient but decayed family, camé louis. Scarcely had they effected their escape, when Paris, but he was consoled for it by the attentions of to Paris on receiving a commission in the guards of the outer door gave way before the strokes of its assail- a lovely wife and kind friends in a foreign land. the young king. For some time he performed his ants, and the room or cave was instantly filled with duties without any thing occurring to render his career men wearing the dress of the civil force. At this SWAINSON'S WORK ON THE HABITS AND of marked interest. One evening, however, in the moment, Montlouis and the young female spoken of month of November 1725, while he was walking along were almost the only parties present. One of the

INSTINCTS OF ANIMALS. one of the streets leading to the Louvre, wrapped intraders, a person who seemed to be their leader, The common sense of mankind has often solved proclosely up in his cloak to defend him from the severity advanced with his sword in his hand to the female, and, blems that have perplexed philosophers. Every body of the weather, and with his hand upon his sword touching her on the shoulder, exclaimed, “I arrest you knows what he means by instinct as distinguished hilt by way of precaution, he felt his arm grasped in the king's name!" Then, turning to those who from reason ; it is only when he comes to explain the suddenly by a passing stranger, and heard the whis- accompanied him, he said, “This is Mademoiselle de pored salutation, " You are here, George, punctual to Brunen ; take her in charge. Fear nothing," he con- difference, and to define the limits between them, thata the hour. Follow me.”. The Christian name of tinued, addressing her; “no outrage will be permitted; he experiences a difficulty. The obvious cause is, that Montlouis was Pierre, and he therefore saw at once we have an order from the king to conduct you to the language is not capable of expressing the minuter that the stranger had made a mistake ; but the natu- convent of ral thoughtlessness and adventurous spirit of youth Mademoiselle do Brunen took a close and agitated

shades of thought; we often see things very clearly led him to form an instantaneous resolution of fol- survey of the man who addressed her, and then, start ourselves, which we are not able to explain to others. lowing the stranger at his invitation. . Accordingly, ing back as from a noxious

reptile, she exclaimed, The tints of an unusual flower, the notes of a newly without another word passing between them, the pair "Begone ! touch me not! I know you, wretch," she discovered bird, the taste of a strange fruit, or the moved onwards along the street Saint-Honoré, and continued ; " you are no servant of the king: Help, fragrance of a new perfume, cannot be adequately after a walk of about five minutes, came to an open friends ! leave me not ; let me not fall into this man's described by words; and the difficulty is increased the alley, where the stranger stopped for an instant, and, hands !" merely remarking, “ This is the place,” turned down the passage. A sort of dark avenue was then crossed, nevertheless, to drag her away, and no one would familiar. We may say in the words of Dryden,

The person of whom she spoke laid hands upon her, more the novelties resemble things with which we are and finally M. Montlouis was led by his guide down probably have interfered, had not her imploring looks, slightly altered, several steps, which conducted them into a dark apart- her youth, and her beauty, stirred the pity of Montment, or rather a cave, as the young officer thought. louis.

Instinct to Reason sure is near allied,

“Let go the lady,” cried he, unsheathing his Though he could see no one, Montlouis was not long sword, “or, whoever you may be, you shall have to

And thin partitions do their bounds divide in discovering that he was in the midst of a pretty answer to 'me.” No reply was made by the other, There are manyactions performed by animals so similar large assemblage of persons. He heard their whispers, who continued his attempts to carry off the lady,

until to those of men, in forethought, contrivance, and the and felt, from the heated atmosphere of the place, that forcibly thrown aside by Montlouis. Before any one adaptation of means to an end, that naturalists find many persons were breathing in it. In a few mo- could interfere, an active combat had commenced be- themselves unable to tell where instinct ends, and ments, moreover, his presence seemed to have been tween the pair. Rapid passes were exchanged, and where reason begins. As in the cases we have cited, announced, for many individuals came up and grasped at length Montlouis laid his antagonist at his feet. his hand, uttering friendly salatations at the same In an instant afterwards the lights were extinguished, of sight, sound, and smell, one single example or time in low and indistinct tones. It may be imagined that the guardsman, wlio well wards by unseen arms into the private passage by so in the subject of instinct the authenticated facts

and the

young guardsman found himself dragged back experiment is worth whole volumes of disquisition, knew the dangers of the times, was by no means satis- which the party had previously disappeared. A gentle of animal life are far more valuable than dissertation, fied with the result, as far as it had appeared, of his voice whispered in his ear, “ Follow me," and he felt adventure. His first impression was, that he was in the hand of Mademoiselle Brunen grasp his own, and

we shall at once proceed to lay before our readers the the presence of a band of robbers. But this suspicion lead him onwards thrrough the darkness. When they most important elucidations of animal life, collected was speedily removed. Some individuals of the party stopped, Montlouis looked around him, and found that by Mr Swainson, omitting, for the present, any notico began noiselessly to light a number of candles, at the they had issued into one of the streets of Paris. completion of which operation M. Montlouis was

of the various theories by which the appearances have

Several coaches stood at the spot. Mademoiselle been explained. enabled distinctly to see the whole scene before him. de Brunen left him, and cntered one of the vehicles, The apartment was indeed a cave, a long cave, at one but immediately afterwards a person came up to the

Memory is notoriously an attribute of animals, and end of which a black curtain hung, concealing from officer and said, “If Monsieur de Montlouis will do in the common cases of dogs, elephants, and other view a small portion of the space. From behind this Mademoiselle de Brumen the honour of assisting in domesticated animals, we know that mcmory geneplace, Montlouis heard the sobs and moanings of one the completion of the sad ceremony which has been rates personal attachment, and if not gratitude, someor more female voices. In the open lighted space disturbed, she will feel gratified.” He at once as thing so very like it, that it is not easy to point out about thirty persons were assembled, all of them wrapt sented, and was conducted to one of the vehicles. the distinction. Stedman, a traveller whose general in long cloaks, similar to that worn by the young “ Forward !" cried a voice, and the whole of the carguardsman, and to which the mistake was doubtless riages started at a rapid pace along the streets. After owing which had brought him there. The party were passing the barriers of the city, the travellers continued all individuals of grave and sombre aspect. their route for a considerable distance, until they to tolerate the Huguenots or Protestants, allowed his ministers

* Orleans, though himself indifferent to religion, and disposed Montlouis vuvered his face as much as possible, and reached a lonely house surrounded by lofty walls. kept back from view, in the hope that no one would Ilere the carriages stopped, and the whole party left mously marked the preceding reign.

to keep up all the rigour against that party which had so infaobserve the error which had been cominitted. After them. The bier was conveyed silently through the a time, a man of about fifty years of age, reverend in lionse into a garden, where a grave was found ready A. C. G. (Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia, vol. cxx.) London,

+ On the Habits and Instincts of Animals By W. Swainson, appearance, and having long hair falling upon his prepared. Rapidly and silently the ceremony of in- Longman and Company.

[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

accuracy Mr Swainson has verified by visiting the toads or frogs, that a careless observer would at first be often found singly. But there can be no doubt of the same country, assures us that the bees at Surinam at some loss to determine their real nature. The gene voluntary principle in associations formed for recreas bocome personally acquainted with those who live walityenfrohe freshwater eels, although from not possess tion; as in the case of rabbits, marmots, parrots, &c. about their nests :

well known to quit the water at certain seasons, and make The meetings of these animals for sport are adverted "On one occasion I was visited at my hut by a neigh-their way over the grass to other ponds, at no great dis- to by Mr Swainson ; but we must pass on to notice a bouring gentleman, whom I conducted up my ladder ; tance, for the purpose of seeking fresh habitations or small finch-like bird called the republican gross-beck, but he had no sooner entered my aërial dwelling, than depositing their spawn. Nearly all the Indian Ephioce, found by the late Colonel Patterson in the interior of he leaped down from the top to the ground, roaring like phali (fresh-water fishes, not unlike our sea mullet) crawl Africa, which actually combines with those of the plunged his head into the river. I'soon discovered the cause up; to others which, by a wonderful and incomprehen- same species to build aërial cities. Critics have long

sible instinct, they seem to know to be full

. Such an abused the old Greek comedian Aristophanes for his of his distress to be an enormous nest of wild bees, or wassee-wassee, in the thatch, directly

above my head as I unusual circumstance as fish crawling on dry land, has extravagant fiction of a city built in the air by the heels, as he had done, and ordered the slaves to demolish that they fall from heaven. The Peren scandens, which birds, but even his fiction is surpassed by the account them without delay.' A tar mop was now brought, and belongs to the same natural tribe as the last (Spirobran- of the winged republicans given by the colonel, which the devastation just going to commence, when an old chidæ, Sw.), quits the water, and ascends the roots and we extract in his own words. negro stepped up, and offered to receive any punishment by using its ventral fins as little feet: it is not clear, nests, is highly curious. In that of which I have given a

“ The method in which these birds fabricate their branches of the mangrove trees, an effort it accomplishes I should decree, if ever one of those bees should sting me however, what purpose it has particularly in view, in plate, there could be no less than from eight hundred to you long ago, had you been a stranger to them; but, that these terrestrial expeditions are perfectly natural to because it perfectly resembles that of a thatched house, being your tenants, and allowed to build on your prez them, is proved by the fact of the whole of this tribe and the ridge forms an angle so acute and so smooth, will never hurt either you or them. I now, at his own having a particular organisation. By this a provision is projecting over the entrance of the nest below, that it is desire, caused the old

black man to be tied to a tree gills, in order to keep them in a state of moisture while Austry seems almost equal to that of the bee; throughout and ordered my boy Quaco to ascend the ladder, quite the fish is out of water."

made for retaining a sufficient quantity of water in the impossible for any reptile to approach them. Their innaked, which he did, and was not stung. I then ven

the day they appear to be busily employed in carrying tured to follow; and I declare, upon my honour, that, These motions are connected with the safety of the a fine species of grass, which is the principal material even after shaking the nest, which made its inhabitants animal, but there are others indicating sport and en-nary work, as well as for additions and repairs. Though

they employ for the purpose of erecting this extraordibuzz about my ears, not a single bee attempted to sting joyment, which go far to rescue the account of the my short stay in the country was not sufficient to satisty discovery. This swarm of bees I afterwards kept unhurt butterfly's ball,” which amused our childhood, from me by ocular proof that they added to their nest as they

annually increased in numbers, still from the many trees as my body-guard. They have made many overseers take the regions of fable. a desperate leap for my amusement, as i generally sent

which I have seen borne down by their weight, and others

“ Insects have also their notions of gaiety or sport; which I have observed with their boughs completely them up my ladder upon some frivolous message, when I among these none seem to vie in their singularity with wished to punish them for injustice and cruelty to the the choral dances which so many

of the Diptera vand covered over, it would appear that this really was the

some of the Neuroptera maintain in the air, in which, The same negro assured me, that on his master's estate however, it has been observed that males alone are en- obliged to give way to the increase of weight, it is obvious

When the tree which is the support of this aërial is was an ancient tree in which had been lodged, ever since

gaged. he could remember, a society of birds, and another of These dances are kept up at all seasons of the year, of rebuilding

in other trees. One of these deserted nests

they are no longer protected, and are under the necessity beer, who lived in the greatest harmony together. But only that in winter they are confined to the robust Tipus I had the curiosity to break down so as to inform myself should any strange birds come to disturb or feed upon lide or gnats, which, however small, are often seen in a of its internal structure, and I found it equally ingenious the bees, they were instantly repulsed by their feathered sunny day of December, when snow is on the ground, with that of the external. There are many entrancer, allies; and if strange bees' dared to venture near the sporting as merrily as in the spring. Sometimes these each of which forms a separate street, with nests on both birds' nests, the native swarm attacked the invaders, and insects look like moving columns, each individual rising sides, at about two inches distant from each other. The stung them to death. He added, that his master's family and falling, in a vertical line, a certain space, and which grass of which it is built is called the Boshman's grass, had so much respect for the above association, that the will follow the passing traveller often intent upon other and I believe the seed of it to be their principal food, tree was considered as sacred."

business, and all unconscious of his aërial companions though on examining their nests I found the legs and The senses of animals vary in acuteness ; they are that the smallest -Tipulidæ will fly unwetted in a heavy nest which I dissected had been inhabited for many years,

for a considerable distance.' Mr Kirby further remarks, wings of different insects. From every appearance, the providentially adapted to the natural modes of obtain shower of rain, as I have often observed. How keen and some parts of it were much more complete than ing existence. But it is not generally known that must be their sight, and how rapid their motions, to others. This, therefore, I conceive nearly to amount to animals enjoy the pleasures of certain senses not less enable them to steer between drops bigger than their a proof that they added to it at different times as they keenly than human beings. The fondness of the ser- them to the ground! own bodies, which, if they fell upon them, must dash found necessary for the increase of the nation or copa

munity." pent for music has been celebrated and doubted from The little water beetles of the genus Gyrinus, so frethe earliest ages, but the snake-charmers of India have quently seen on the surface of fresh-water ponds in a

The gross-beaks associate for defence, but we find now verified the fact. Mr Swainson has himself bright summer's day, are as joyous a race as their brethren that the ants associate for war. This is too bad ; war, proved that the lizards are eminent for their love of latory circles is not loss admirable than the precision with worthy of being purchased by everlasting debt, is en

the gnats. The rapidity with which they skim in undu- so long deemed the proud prerogative of man, a luxury music :

" The elegant little species commonly called the La- never to encounter and seldom to touch each other. joyed by the ants without any compensating burthen abundance in the south of Europe, that hundreds on a diversion for hours with unwearied gaiety." certu agilis, although rare in Britain, is found in such Their flattened and oar-shaped hind feet are peculiarly of taxation. They actually anticipated the most cele

adapted for these exercises, and they continue their brated contrivance of Napoleon, for they dispense with fine sunny day may be seen in a single walk, basking on

& commissariat, and make the war pay its own exthe stones and walls, or pursuing their search after in- The attitudes which insects assume to screen them- penses. The history of one of their battles is to the rons, and very beautiful. The habit they have of turning shall quote a few of the less known instances. sects. In Sicily and Malta, they are particularly nume selves from observation, are very remarkable. We full as interesting as any bulletin ever issued

by Napothe head on one side, and some vague recollection of a

leon, or any dispatch published in a London Gazette story in the Arabian Nights about an attentive lizard, “ Many of the weevil beetles (Circulesnidos), particu

Extraordinary. first induced us to try what effect the humming of a song larly those with short thick bodies, on the least appear- “ Figure to yourself two or three of these ant cities, would have upon these creatures, and it was really most ance of danger gather themselves into a heap, bend their equal in size and population, and situated at about a entertaining. The little reptile, instead of running away snout under the thorax, and fall to the ground from the hundred paces from each other; observe their countless with its usual swiftness, would remain perfectly stili, | plants on which they happen to be feeding. It is then numbers, equal to the population of two mighty empires; inclining its head on one side, as if to drink in every in- vain to search for them, for the colours being perfectly the whole space which separates them for the space of tonation. The softer and more plaintive was the tune, matched to those of the ground, the keenest eye will be twenty-four inches, appears alive with prodigious crowds the more intense was the attention it evinced; and if a completely baffled. There is a genus of this family found of their inhabitants. The armies meet midway between whistle was substituted for a hum, it would suffer itself in the sandy tracts of Africa and of Sicily, which, although their respective habitations, and there join battle : thou to be approached so near, that any one unacquainted large, is so exactly coloured like the sand, that few en- sands of champions, mounted on more elevated spots, with its astonishing swiftness would fancy he could cap- tomologists would distinguish the insect from the sur- engage in single combat, and seize each other with their ture it with his hand. This curious fact, once discovered, rounding soil.

powerful jaws; a still greater number are engaged on often proved a source of much amusement. Often, after One of the most singular attitudes of this sort is that both sides taking prisoners, which make vain efforts to a long ramble spent in sketching or botanising, we used assumed by nearly all the onisciform types of annulose escape, conscious of the cruel fate which awaits them to repose in a shady spot among the rocks, and charm animals, and by many of those in the vertebrated cirele; when arrived at the hostile formicary. those pretty little creatures so successfully, that we have it is that of rolling themselves up in a perfectly spherical known them even to come out of their holes, and thus ball, like the common wood-louse. In this attitude, the three square feet in dimensions; a penetrating odour ex

The spot where the battle most rages, is about two or fortu a little audience. On such occasions they some- logs, and all the softer parts of the body on the under hales on all sides; numbers of ants are lying dead covered times stand remarkably upright on their fore-legs, the side, are entirely covered and defended by the hard crust with venom; others, composing groups and chains, are hinder ones lying almost fiat upon the ground; the same which forms the upper surface of the animal. Other hooked together by their legs or jaws, and drag each attitude they also assume when reconnoitring, but then insects endeavour to protect themselves from danger by other alternately in opposite directions. These groups the head is never turned on one side as if for the purpose feigning death. The common dung chafer (Geotrupis are formed gradually : at first a pair of combatants seize of accurately hearing. The same experiments were fre- stercorarius), when touched, or in fear, sets out its legs as each other, and rearing upon their hind legs, mutually quently made upon the smaller lizards of Brazil, which stiff as if they were made of iron wire-which is their squirt their acid ; then closing, they fall, and wrestle in more or less exhibited the same fondness for tunes." position when dead-and remain perfectly motionless. the dust : again recovering their feet, each endeavours to In no part of natural history are mistakes more probably with the

same view; while the Scarabocus sacer, remain immovcable till the arrival of a third gives one

The tree chafers elevate their posterior legs into the air, drag off his antagonist. If their strength be equal, they common than in what relates to the motions of ani- and its allies, if our memory serves us right, pack their the advantage. Both, however, are often succoured at mals. As we generally see them in one element, we legs close to their bodies

in the same manner as do the the same time, and the battle still continues undecided ; are led to believe that they are confined to it. In- Byrrhii mentioned by Mr Kirby. The same author others take part on each side till chains are formed of six;

relates, from the scarce volumes of De Gier, the extra- eight, or sometimes ten, all hooked together, and pertideed, “ a fish out of water” has become quite a pro- ordinary perseverance with which the little beetle, named naciously struggling for the mastery: the equilibrium verb. Mr Swainson has, however, collected some Anobium pertinax by Fabricius, persists in counterfeiting remains unbroken, till a number of champions from the observations, which will require the aphorism to be death. : All that bas been related of the heroic con- same nest arrive at once, compel them to let go their

stancy of American savagcs, when taken and tortured by hold, and the single combat recommences. received for the future with considerable limitations. their enemies, scarcely comes up to that which these little

at the approach of night, each party gradually retreats * To include walking on land and climbing up trees as creatures exhibit

. You may maim them, pull

them limb to its own city; but before the following dawn, the comamong the actual motions of this class of animals (fishes), from limb, roast them alive over a slow fire, but you will bat is renewed with redoubled fury, and occupies a will no doubt surprise many of our readers; yet there are not gain your end—not a joint will they move, nor show greater extent of ground. These daily fights

continue not wanting several fishes which perform these apparently by the least symptom that they suffer pain. Many till, violent rains separating the

combatants, they forget unnatural feats. The frog fishes of the Asiatic

islands Tenthredine,
or saw-fies, pack their
antenna and legs their quarrel

, and peace is restored. In these engageand the southern hemisphere can not only live several close together; and every one has witnessed the same ments the combatants exhibit the greatest fury, being days out of the water, but can crawl about the room in remarkable liabit in the majority of spiders.”

absorbed by one sole object, that of finding an enemy to which they are confined ; this latter facility originates from the great strength and the peculiar position of their

Societies and associations of animals are not always attack. What is most wonderful in this history-though pectoral fins, which thus perform the office of feet. the result of blind impulse ; jackals unite to hunt in all are of the same make, colour, and scent-every ant

seems to know those of its own party; and if by mistake The whole aspect of these grotesque-looking creatures, packs ; birds form flocks to migrate ; and in both cases

one was attacked, it was immediately discovered by the particularly in a walking position, is so much like that of the union is voluntary, for the jackals and birds are assailant, and caresses succeeded blows.

[graphic]

HOW CAPITAL IS FORMED.

[ocr errors]

BY A, OPIE.

Though all was fury and carnage in the space between pearance so singular, yet so distinguished, that he nable ground for supposing that he wrote these celethe two nests, on the other side the paths were full of would have attracted and fixed my attention had I brated letters. ants going to and fro on the ordinary business of the society as in times of peace, and the whole formicary exknown nothing of his previous character.

He certainly wrote, in 1793, a paraphlet on the hibited an appearance of order and tranquillity, except I never saw a human face so much resembling a

state of prisons in England, and the means of improving that on the quarter leading to the field of battle; crowds parrot as his was. The nose appeared to me like a them—a proof that he was anxious to mitigate the

sufferings even of his erring fellow-creatures, and was army of their compatriots, or returning home with the beak, and the nostril was cut up like the beak of a prisoners they had taken, which, it is to be feared, are parrot. The ball of the eye was very large and pro been the writer of a political work as much distin

therefore more deserving of esteem than if he had the devoted victims to a cannibal feast.” We might extend our views to the systems of emi- expressive, and intellectual

, that I soon ceased to guished for bitterness of invective as for brilliancy

of gration and colonisation adopted by the ants, and remember or notice any other of the features.

wit, and with this observation I shall conclude my show that, like higher animals, they evince a haughty

recollections of the Earl of Rosslyn. disregard for the rights of the aborigines; but we

It was not long before I procured a seat on the have given sufficient instances to show that animals bench beside the judge ; and in the course of the

ANNALS OF THE POOR. the most mean and contemptible in vulgar eyes are morning I had the pleasure of hearing him converse, STORY OF AN OLD WIFIE—MERCANTILE INGENUITYendowed with qualities which have every semblance for Windham of Tulbrigg, who was then member for of reason. It remains only to point out the important N— came to pay his respects to him ; and I was

What follows is an extract from a letter addressed by distinction, which is at once most obvious and most satisfactory: there is no progress and no improvement much gratified in remaking the flashing of their fine a lady, now residing in a large provincial town in Scotin animals ; a limit is set to the exercise of their facul- intelligent eyes, as, leaning across me, they talked land, to her nicce in Edinburgh, the latter being merely ties; nature has said to each,“ thus far shalt thou go, together on interesting subjects.

a child. Though intended only to amuse a little girl and and no farther;" but man has received from his Crea

her young companions, it seems to us calculated to give This was a higher gratification to me than any pleasure, and convey instruction, to a wider circle. The to placed beyond our ken ; continued improvement is thing I had as yet heard that morning ; for it was simple language of the original is retained,

as the best the law of his existence ; 'the perfection of the animal always one of my greatest pleasures to see and hear that could be employed on the occasion :is attained in this present life, but man presses forward Mr Windham, and now I was certainly hearing him -, who takes charge of the savings' bank here, to a higher destiny, feeling that intellectually and to peculiar advantage. I was therefore sorry when

was very much pleased with an old wifie, who came remorally there is something beyond, higher and better he withdrew, and left the judge to resume his legal | This careful decent wifie earned her bread by making

gularly every Saturday night and deposited a little sum. than any thing which he has yet attained; that the duties ; but those duties soon became so interesting jib, or what is sometimes called black man, but is here full developement of his powers is not possible in time, but demands eternity. to me, that I had no remaining regret.

called toffy :* 80 her name was Toffy Betty. Well, Betty

A young clergyman in the county had allowed came regularly till she had fifty pounds in the bank, so RECOLLECTIONS OF AN AUTHORESS. passion, and a supposed sense of injury, to master him that Mr was quite pleased with her, and one night so completely, that in a public ball-room he pulled a

he inquired how she contrived to save so much money. ALEXANDER WEDDERBURNE,

gentleman by the nose ; and the person assaulted was Betty told him that she made toffy, and sold it to the BARON LOUGHBOROUGH AND EARL OF ROSSLYN. now about to seek legal reparation, and the moment week. At one time she got a rival in her business.

school-boys, and she always tried to save a little every As I have alluded to this nobleman in my recollections

was arrived. was very attentive to what passed Another woman, who saw that she was thriving in trade, of Lady Rosslyn, the wife of his successor, I am inclined below me, but equally engaged in watching its effect opened a shop for jib just opposite to her; and she to follow up that allusion by some reminiscences of the on the speaking countenance of the judge, in which I thought that she would have been ruined. But what do judge himself. I find, in a slight sketch of his life, fancied that I saw condemnation of the folly of bring- you think poor old Betty did ? She bought a hobbythat he was born in Scotland in 1733, educated at the ing such an action. At length a witness was called horse at a sale; and every boy who came to buy, got a University of Edinburgh, and called to the Scotch to prove the

assault. He was a tall
, thin, sallow man, crowded when the schools came

out ; and she made be bar in 1754.* The next year he was entered at the much respected

in his neighbourhood, but he had a tween four and five hundred pounds, and built a house, Inner Temple . He began his public

carcer as member precise, slow, formal manner of speaking, very trying and now lives in it, and keeps a grocer's shop.” for Richmond in Yorkshire, was made Solicitor-Gene- in a witness-box. However, the judge was patient,

THE CHEAP POSTAGE. ral in 1771, Attorney-General in 1778, created Baron and evidently much diverted by the manner and

A letter which one of the editors of this paper received matter of the witness. Loughborouglı in 1780, and then raised to the bench as

“But to the point, sir,” cried from a gentleman who resides in the Highlands, soon Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.

the less patient examiner. “Did you see the assault after the commencement of the fourpenny post, contained This distinguished man soon paid the usual penalty

or not ?” “Yes, I did,” he replied ; " I was standing the following passage :-“ I quite enter into your feelings exacted from the prosperous, as he became a mark for by the dance when Mr B drew near. He placed with regard to the great boon granted in the reduction satire and detraction ; and though he was reputed to himself opposite to Mr, at perhaps twelve paces, of postage. It is a blessing which we can hardly conceive

or so, distant from him. He then put his hand to his to the thousands who, till now, have been totally excluded have shown great mildness and moderation while he head, and leaned his elbow on his other hand—thus. from any intercourse with their distant friends. It is not held the difficult and invidious office of Attorney. He seemed for some minutes, but I cannot say how ask for some means of buying a letter out of the post-office,' General, he was charged with being fond of conrict many, absorbed in thought ; I might say, in intense which has been waiting there perhaps for weeks. The ing capitally when he became a judge. Whether this thinking; when, suddenly, he sprang forward, and cost of a letter from England or elsewhere (one shilling charge was true or not, I am not able to decide, pulled Mr - by the nose."

or one and sixpence), from some of the friends of the but I trust that there are few judges of the present Universal laughter followed this testimony, which, labouring classes, has acted as an absolute prohibition of day who can be said with truth to delight in inflicting though checked immediately by the call of silence, all intercourse between them.” An illustration like this capital punishment. But the severest blow to his was renewed, when the judge, casting a satirical is fit to downweigh whole articles in wrong-headed recharacter was inflicted by Churchill in his poem of glance around, observed, in a loud voice, “ The most views, written by gentlemen skilled to “ make the worse the Rosciad-as by singular result of intense thinking that I ever re

appear the better reason.' “ A pert, prim prater of the Northern race, member !" and the corner of his mouth still moved

WHAT IS THE PRACTICAL GOOD OF SCIENCE ? Guill in his heart, and famine in his face," with internal laughter, even when he had resumed the

The common mind is little qualified to trace science to he meant to designate Alexander Wedderburne. I listening attitude of the judge. In the meanwhile, I its results in the promotion of human happiness. In the conclude, that, when Attorney-General, he had been

was delighted to find that a judge could laugh, in direct following case, however, the benefit is so direct, that the concerned in the prosecution of Wilkes, the friend of contradiction to the old saying “as grave as a judge." simplest may comprehend :

* On the occasion recent visit to the Churchill, and thence the bitter animosity which | Little did I then foresee that in after years from that (Dublin), we had an opportunity of seeing and learning these lines portray. But whether the poet had / period, the same judge would have been led to excite the particulars of one of those extraordinary proofs

as universal a laugh in the Court of Chancery, of of the resources of medical, or rather surgical science, just ground or not for thus attacking Lord Lough- which I was the original cause. Soon after these which, both in these countries and on the continent, liave borough, I was particularly desirous to see him when assizes he was made Lord Chancellor, and an appli- of late years surprised and gratified mankind, and whiclı I heard he was come to N— to preside at our cation came before him, in which I was interested. are among the best and noblest triumphs of the art. The assizes, and with Churchill's portrait of him“ in my A little ballad of mine, called “the Orphan Boy,” | case to which we refer is that of a child then, and mind's eye,” I eagerly repaired to the Nisi Prius which I had written for one composer, and therefore probably still, in St Vincent's Hospital, Stephen's Green; Court, to compare it with the original. But I saw had made it his sole property, was set to music and and the particulars

, as stated to us by a non-profesneither“ pertness,” “primness," nor "famine,” in the published by another; and my friend applied to the sional gentleman, by whom we were accompanied, and face before me. Of what « guilt” might lie in the Chancellor to grant an injunction, to forbid the rival who had taken great interest in the case from the heart of the accused, I could not judge ; but now, when composer from selling what he had set. The counsel commencement, were as follow :- The wretched infant, I daily see that even good men are led by political diffe- for the contending parties had been warm and long in the child of poor parents in the neighbourhood of rences, and their result, personal hatred, to accuse and debate, when the Chancellor, assuming, I doubt not, Cabinteely, was the subject of one of those hideous

malformations with which it occasionally pleases Provilify their fellow creatures, I am inclined to hope the meaning satirical look which I had seen and enthat the guilt imputed to Lord Loughborough was joyed on another occasion, begged leave to ask whether the present case was what is usually termed • pig's-face.'

vidence to afflict and disfigure humanity, and which in it would not be better, and certainly it would be more the creature of the poet's rancorous revenge and his amusing, if each composer was to sing his own song in to the mouth or a bottom to the nose, and in the stead

In this instance nature had failed to make either a front political dislike. However, I soon forgot Churchill's

court! This proposal excited a general burst of there projected a kind of proboscis or snout, like that of opinion in my eagerness to form my own of the in- laughter; and as it was deemed an evidence that the a pig, with two teeth pointing outwards from its end. teresting man I came to see ; and I thought his ap- judge was fatigued, it brought the business to a The wretched child, as soon as it was able to make an

speedier decision, which was in favour of my friend, effort to feed itself (for it never sucked), was in the habit *["He was rapidly gaining ground as a junior counsel, when and the injunction was granted.

of thrusting its arm, up to the elbow, into the hideons an accident put a sudden stop to his practice in his native courts. Helad gained the cause of a client in opposition to the celebrated

Soon after, Lord Loughborough was created Earl cavity in the lower part of the face, in order to place its Lockhart, when the defeated veteran, unable to conceal his of Rosslyn, but his infirmities increased so rapidly, food within the passage to the stomach. The feelings of chagrin, took occasion from something in the manner of Mr that he died suddenly of apoplexy in 1805, and was aversion with which the miserable creature was regarded

by their neighbours rendered the condition of the unforseverity of the young barrister's reply drew upon him so illiberal buried in St Paul's Cathedral. a rebuke from one of the judges, that he immediately unrobed, As he was supposed by many to have been the tunate parents most wretched, until at length the poor and, bowing to the court, declared that he would never moro plead where he was subjected to insult, but would seek a wider author of the Letters of Junius, no mean opinion could mother, sick of its constant presence and monstrous ap

pearance, brought it to the hospital, declaring she wonld field for his professional exertions. He accordingly removed to have been entertained of his abilities, as it was a comLondon, and enrolled himself nner Temple."- pliment to the head of any man to be supposed capable hazardous to its life, if there were any chance of render

be quite resigned to the result of any operation, however Scottish Biographical Dictionary. It was Wedderburne who George III. the courageous advice to call in the troops for the of writing so well, though it was any thing but a comsuppression of the London riots of 1780.-ED.)

pliment to his heart. But I believe there is no te- *[A kind of tablet made by boiling treacle or coarso sugar.)

member of th

ing its appearance less miserable and disgusting. The at least over it, and which were intended to bow down replacing it, previatudy is that he wisebrine child was in consequence admitted into the hospital, to the vessel at a very gentle slope, as the column de- it in its site. where, under the most discouraging circumstances, an scended to the vessel. On the 19th of June, at four The architeet, in the transion by ulus, operation was planned and performed by its distin- in the morning, all was ready for the embarkment of brought his work safely to em pones guished chief surgeon, Mr Ferrall. We are of course the column. Ten capstans, placed on the transverse on its pedestal amid the serlanderson har et store unable to give any professional detail of the proceeding, mole already spoken of, began, at a given signal, to people. A statue was afterwards ytan in leving but, incredible as it may appear, all the natural deficien- act upon the massive freight; while sixty workmen of it, and the Alexandrine Column www starte mellom cies of feature were under this gentleman's skilful manage were placed

at the cables which aided in the operation, northern capital

, a credit

to the nation est un ka «tra, ment supplied from the flesh of the adjacent parts, and and also in keeping the ship in its place. The

column tors. As a monolithic pillar, it has no equal stand

was set in motion; every thing went on well and the erections of modern times. the infant, at the time to which we refer, when it was little more than a year old, already exhibited the appear when, in a moment, an accident occurred which threw

securely; it had just touched the sides of the vessel, ance of perfect health and of a well-formed face. When all into consternatíon. The beams upon which the LETTER OF AN AUSTRALIAN SETILER. the child was first seen by the parents after the decided column rested in its passage, cracked; the alarmed Any thing beyond common experiences which children success of the operation, it would, as we were assured, workmen fled; and the column, breaking at once see for the first time, never fails to make a permanent be quite impossible to describe the excessive joy of the through the whole of the supporting beams, fell with impression upon them. I (the reader must underpoor mother, as on her knees she presented to the anxious a terrible crash among their fragments, having one father the altered infant, now become a really well-look- end in the boat and the other sunk deep in the bed of stand that one of the editors of this paper now speaks ing and comely child. Such, we repeat, are among the the sea.

in his proper person) can never forget the first time best and noblest triumphs of the profession."-Leinster

It was some time before the architect and his work. I beheld a scientific instrument used. It was a theoIndependent.

men could look about them. When they did so, it dolite belonging to a gentleman who was taking levels

was gratifying to discover that not one life had been along the vale of Tweed, with a view to the construcTHE ALEXANDRINE COLUMN OF ST lost, notwithstanding the numbers about the spot at tion of a railway between Glasgow and Berwick-PETERSBURGH.

the moment. Without delay, the superintendant of work which never was commenced. This was in the

the embarkation commenced to remedy the evil. In THE Alexandrine Column, or monumental pillar consequence of the weight falling obliquely

on it

, the early days of railways, about the year 1810 or 1811, erected by the Russian czar, Nicholas, in honour of vessel was turned over sideways, and partly forced into when they were not so readily entered upon as they his brother Alexander, is one of the most magnificent the clayey bed of the sea. The whole power of the are now. Mr KS a land-surveyor settled in Roxobjects of its kind in modern times. Like the power machinery was applied to raise the column to a fair burghshire, had been employed to make the necessary and empire of Russia itself, the Alexandrine column and proper position on the vessel. The 400 fatigued surveys through Peeblesshire, and when he came, in is, in conception and execution, massive and colossal, labourers could not have accomplished this alone, but the course of his operations, to the little sequestered and impressive to the mind and eye from mere mate it chanced that some visitors of distinction had arrived town in which I spent my first years, he became rial bulk. The various processes attending its erec- from St Petersburgh to witness the operations, and acquainted with my father, who was then almost tion form a very remarkable history, interesting from the difficulties, foreseen and unforeseen, which stood in diate assistance of 600 soldiers from a garrison near

one of these took it upon him to order in the imme- singular in the place for a love of science ; a feeling the way, and which were successively overcome by the the spot. With this reinforcement, after forty-eight which he early imparted to myself, along with

much patience and skill of the architect and his assistants. hours

of almost incredible toil, the column was safely valuable instruction. At his request, our surveying man by birth, has left such a history behind him. We raised, and laid straight upon the vessels. The latter friend erected his theodolite in the street, and ex translate, for the entertainment of our readers, some of machine, to the delight of all, floated lightly and easily plained its uses to my brother and myself, to our in

. the most important passages in this narrative.

finite pleasure, and with the effect of awakening in The Alexandrine Column is a monolithe, or formed

On the 1st of July, after four days' slow sail in the

our minds a reverence for the instruments of exact of a single stone. It is a fine species of granite, capable Gulf of Finland, the vessel was safely towed into the science, and indelibly impressing upon us a pleasing of taking on a beautiful polish, and of a red colour, required place in the harbour of St Petersburgh. The recollection of the kind demonstrator himself.

I am tempted to mention these circumstances, in being also exceedingly durable. The column, which column and its vessel were now visited by immense is circular, and sculptured, generally speaking, after crowds, the grandees and royal family of the country order to give the greater assurance of the genuineness the Doric style, measures twelve feet in its greatest among the number. The next operation was to of a very interesting letter, which it has been thought diameter, and eighty-four feet in height. It is thus convey the stone to land. For this purpose, a new

worth while to communicate to the public in this twelve feet higher than the obelisk of Luxor, one of work of great strength, inclined in its shape, had to sheet. Having lost much capital in farming in his the finest ancient erections of this character, and it be constructed, into the particulars of which it is need native county, Mr Kemigrated in 1824, with a weighs thrice as much as the same Egyptian pillar. less to enter. Suffice it to say, that on the 12th of number of sons and daughters, to New South Wales, of Pytterlaxe, in the neighbourhood of St Petersburgh, great crowd had assembled to witness it. The empe, Brisbane, he very quickly found himself settled in an The Alexandrine Column was cut from the quarries July the debarkation

of the monolithe took place. A where, his scientific acquirements having recommended in the year 1631. These quarries are situated no great ror and empress appeared on the scene. The signal way from the shores of the watersenveloping that region was given, and the importance of the operation may agreeable and lucrative situation on the Emu Plains. and the Russian capital. While the stone was in the be guessed by the fact that all the workmen fell in- The letter in question is one written by Mr Kcourse of being excavated, a vessel was also in prepara- voluntarily and simultaneously on their knees before at his settlement of Cardross, Goulburn, on the 5th of tion for the conveyance of its enormous mass from

its venturing

on the task, and prayed for its success. Four- July 1839; the object of which was to acquaint one native site to that chosen for it in St Petersburgh. This teen capstans were set in action to move the column, of his sons, who still resides in this country, with his vessel was broad and flat-bottomed, one hundred and while six were devoted to the keeping of the vessel

, present circumstances. It was of course not meant forty-seven feet long, and calculated to draw only about otherwise bound also, in its place. The result was for publication ; but as it possesses a general interest, seven feet of water under a weight of two million six fortunate. Slowly, and amid profound silence, the

as an account of the career and present situation of a hundred thousand pounds, a weight considerably column began to move, and in ten minutes, without prosperous emigrant, it is here, with the permission of exceeding that of the monolithic shaft. With a greater accident, it was safely brought to a spot beneath the

his friends, laid before the public :draught, it could not have traversed the numerous window of the palace, whence the empress had beheld

“ We [Mr K— and one of his sons named James) shallows in the line of its intended course. On the the scene.

have been striving very hard for the last twelve years, 5th of June 1832, this vessel, in itself a work of huge

An inclined plane was now to be made, to bring it chase of land and live stock. We have now as much

and vesting what money we could realise in the purbulk, was brought to anchor near to the quarries of up to the level of the spot, where its pedestal was Pytterlaxe. erected, in the centre of a square; and 600 carpen, tune for those I leave behind; and in regard to land, we

stock as is required for the foundation of a splendid forPreparations on a vast scale had been previously ters addressed themselves to this task. The inclined have abundance, and I only wish to obtain 850 acres more, made for the embarkation of the columnar shaft. Á plane was 490 feet long, and 100 feet in breadth, and, to render my establishment on the sea-coast one of the mole or causeway had been carried into the sea to the at its greatest eleration, rose to thirty-five feet. The most perfect in the colony : this must fetch a high price length of thirty fathoms, forming in itself a goodly same difficulty which obstructed the rolling of the at auction, still it is worth double to me that it would be pier, and requiring considerable labour. It was raised column to the water, impeded its progress up this plane. to any other purchaser. upon stakes, driven into the sea-bed, and consisted of This was the inequality in thickness, and it was always Our different estates at present stand as follow :strong interlaced or crossing beams, the interspaces necessary, when the thick end of the column got in ad- to wit, lst, Cardross, where I now reside, contains 2000 of which were filled with stones. At the end of this vance, to make it pause and revolve upon itself till the acres, with 200 acres in cultivation ; my grant.—2d, mole, a transverse embankment was formed, and by lesser end was brought forward also. After a time, the Cardross Grange, adjoining the above, contains 1000 acres, moored. It was necessary, however, first to deepen happening to the wood-work. Before the passage of the 200 acres in cultivation ; grant to James.--4th, Straththe side of this, or rather inside of it, the vessel was inclination was safely surmounted, without any accident with 100 acres in cultivation; a purchase.-3d, Maxton the channel by two feet, in order to admit of the free inclined plane, it ought to be mentioned, workmen, to allen, adjoining

on east, late Howey's,

contains 960 acres, passage of the vessel. On the transverse mole were the number of 150, were busied in giving the finish to

with 150 acres in cultivation; a purchase, 1000 guineas.placed the capstans by which the embarkation was to the figure of the column. When he had brought it 5th, Raine Ville, on Fish River, near Bathurst, contains be effected. By land, preparations on an equally large to the top of the plane, the architect then prepared a 2000 acres, with 200 acres in cultivation ; a purchase.--scale were made in the meantime. In order to ad- car for its transportation along the horizontal space 6th, St Boswell's adjoining, and east from the last lot, vance the column from the spot where it had been which still lay between it and the proposed site. This contains 1221 acres, with 70 acres in cultivation; a parformed, it was necessary to clear the intermediate car was in two pieces, and in all eighty-two feet long chase.—7th, Mount Jervis, on Jervis's Bay, twelve hours ground, about a hundred yards in oxtent, and very by eleven in breadth. It had seventy-two cast-iron sail from Sydney, contains 2560 acres; just commenced rocky and uneven. Theexploding, cutting, and smooth wheels, and was composed of metal-bound beams. By improvements. ---Total, 11,741 acres. On Cardross we ing required for this purpose, was in itself a great work. means of this machine, the column was securely moved have a post wind-mill, fine garden and vineyard of 2 acres, When a pathway had thus been made, the stone was to the necessary spot.

the scenery and surface soft and undulating and 800 slowly raised by the action of eight powerful capstans, Perhaps the hardest task of all now commenced.

acres of rich land might be cultivated without removing and propelled a little way, rolling over and over This was the conception and erection of the great breadthways. The greater diameter of one end made scaffolding by means of which this immense mass of James and the captain [another son) have been there

I intend making Mount Jervis my principal residencc. this a difficult process, for the narrow end, rolling over stone was to be safely lodged on its pedestal, there to since February, busy in clearing and inclosing a fine park less space, necessarily fell behind. A peculiar appli- remain till time should work its fall. This scaffold- and policy of 150 acres, with vineyards and orangery of cation of the capstans, with the assistance of strong ing, we shall only say, was 154 feet high, and partly 5 acres, paddocks for tobacco, maize, hops, &c. &c., and iron, wedges, was required to bring it forward to a composed of mason-work, and partly of wood. The laying the foundation of an observatory on the exact straight line. After four hundred men had laboured mason-work formed an inferior platform, and on this parallel of 35 degrees south latitude, and 150 degrees 50 at the task for fifteen days, without any intermission, sixty capstans of great power were placed for the minutes of longitude east from Greenwich. This estate mole, in a direction parallel with the sides of tlie the appendages belonging to it, was first tried, and which is perhaps the finest harbour in her majesty's dothe column was at length placed at the end of the raising of the column. Each of these machines, with commands thirty miles of sea-coast, namely, fifteen miles vessel upon which it was to be lodged.

The column now lay transversely upon twenty-eight spondent ropes were made by machinery, each rope minions, where the whole British navy may find anchorbeams, thirty-five feet long, and two feet square, the containing 622 threads of hemp, so strong that every end of which passed from the mole to the vessel, or thread sustained singly a weight of 180 pounds. With mansiomeranot be excelled in grandesunbyany place I ever

such preparations, the placing of the column could just under my windows, at a quarter of a mile's dis* As this is translated from the French, it is probable that the

not fail to be successful. Yet the architect took the tance, where vessels of 200 tons anchor within a cable's weights and measures mentioned are French, which differ a little precaution to try all his apparatus more fully, by length of the shore. The bay and coast abound with from the British.

raising the column twenty feet in the air, and then I fish of every delicacy and variety-oysters, both rook

a tree,

HOW CAPITAL IS FORMED.

BY A, OPIE.

Though all was fury and carnage in the space between pearance so singular, yet so distinguished, that he nable ground for supposing that he wrote these celethe two nests, on the other side the paths were full of would have attracted and fixed my attention had I brated letters. ants going to and fro on the ordinary business of the society as in times of peace, and the whole formicary ex- | known nothing of his previous character.

He certainly wrote, in 1793, a painphlet on the hibited an appearance of order and tranquillity, except I never saw a human face so much resembling a state of prisons in England, and the means of improving that on the quarter leading to the field of battle; crowds parrot as his was. The nose appeared to me like a

them-a proof that he was anxious to mitigate the might always be seen either marching to reinforce the army of their compatriots, or returning home with the beak, and the nostril was cut up like the beak of a sufferings even of his'erring fellow-creatures, and was prisoners they had taken, which, it is to be feared, are parrot. The ball of the eye was very large and pro been the writer of a political work as much distin

therefore moro deserving of esteem than if he had the devoted victims to a cannibal feast." We might extend our views to the systems of emi- expressive, and intellectual

, that I soon ceased to guished for bitterness of invective as for brilliancy of gration and colonisation adopted by the ants, and remember or notice any other of the features.

wit, and with this observation I shall conclude my show that, like higher animals, they evince a haughty

recollections of the Earl of Rosslyn. disregard for the rights of the aborigines; but we

It was not long before I procured a seat on the have given sufficient instances to show that animals bench beside the judge ; and in the course of the

ANNALS OF THE POOR. the most mean and contemptible in vulgar eyes are morning I had the pleasure of hearing him converse, STORY OF AN OLD WIFIE-MERCANTILE INGENUITYendowed with qualities which have every semblance for Windham of Tulbrigg, who was then member for of reason. It remains only to point out the important N— came to pay his respects to him ; and I was

What follows is an extract from a letter addressed by distinction, which is at once most obvious and most satisfactory: there is no progress and no improvement much gratified in remaking the flashing of their fine a lady, now residing in a large provincial town in Scotin animals; a limit is set to the exercise of their facul- intelligent eyes, as, leaning across me, they talked land, to her niece in Edinburgh, the latter being merely

a child. Though intended only to amuse a little girl and ties; nature has said to each, thus far shalt thou go, together on interesting subjects. and no farther;" but man has received from his Crea

her young companions, it seems to us calculated to give

This was a higher gratification to me than any pleasure, and convey instruction, to a wider circle. The tor an impulse to an advancement whose final goal is thing I had as yet heard that morning ; for it was simple language of the original is retained, as the best the law of his existence ; 'the perfection of the animal always one of my greatest pleasures to see and hear that could be employed on the occasion :is attained in this present life, but man presses forward Mr Windham, and now I was certainly hearing him “ Mr , who takes charge of the savings' bank here, to a higher destiny, feeling that intellectually and to peculiar advantage. I was therefore sorry when

was very much pleased with an old wifie, who came remorally there is something beyond, higher and better he withdrew, and left the judge to resume his legal This careful decent wifie earned her bread by making

gularly every Saturday night and deposited a little sum. than any thing which he has yet attained; that the duties ; but those duties soon became so interesting jib, or what is sometimes called black man, but is here full developement of his powers is not possible in time, but demands eternity. to me, that I had no remaining regret.

called toffy :* so her name was Toffy Betty. Well, Betty

A young clergyman in the county had allowed came regularly till she had fifty pounds in the bank, 80 RECOLLECTIONS OF AN AUTHORESS. passion, and a supposed sense of injury, to master him that Mr was quite pleased with her, and one night so completely, that in a public ball-room he pulled a

ho inquired how she contrived to save so much money. ALEXANDER WEDDERBURNE, gentleman by the nose ; and the person assaulted was Betty told him that she made toffy, and sold it to the

school-boys, and she always tried to save a little every BARON LOUGHBOROUGH AND EARL OF ROSSLYN.

now about to seek legal reparation, and the moment week. At one time she got a rival in her business. As I have alluded to this nobleman in

was arrived. I was very attentive to what passed Another woman, who saw that she was thriving in trade,

my recollections of Lady Rosslyn, the wife of his successor, I am inclined below me, but equally engaged in watching its effect opened a shop for jib just opposite to her; and she to follow up that allusion by some reminiscences of the

on the speaking countenance of the judge, in which I thought that she would have been ruined. But what do judge himself. I find, in a slight sketch of his life, fancied that I saw condemnation of the folly of bring- you think poor old Betty did ? She bought a hobbythat he was born in Scotland in 1733, educated at the ing such an action. At length a witness was called horse at a sale; and every boy who came to buy, got a

ride upon the hobby-horse, and Betty's door was always University of Edinburgh, and called to the Scotch to prove the assault. He was a tall, thin, sallow man, crowded when the schools came out; and she made be bar in 1754.* The next year he was entered at the much respected in his neighbourhood, but he had a tween four and five hundred pounds, and built a house, Inner Temple . He began his public career as member precise, slow, formal manner of speaking, very trying and

now lives in it, and keeps a grocer's shop.” for Richmond in Yorkshire, was made Solicitor-Gene- in a witness-box. However, the judge was patient,

THE CHEAP POSTAGE. ral in 1771, Attorney-General in 1778, created Baron and evidently much diverted by the manner and

A letter which one of the editors of this paper received Loughborough in 1780, and then raised to the bench as matter of the witness. “But to the point, sir,” cried from a gentleman who resides in the Highlands, soon Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.

the less patient examiner. “Did you see the assault after the commencement of the fourpenny post, contained This distinguished man soon paid the usual penalty

or not ?" "Yes, I did,” he replied ; " I was standing the following passage :—"I quite enter into your feelings

drew near. He placed

with regard to the great boon granted in the reduction exacted from the prosperous, as he became a mark for by the dance when Mr B

of postage. It is a blessing which we can hardly conceive satire and detraction ; and though he was reputed to himself opposite to MrL, at perhaps twelve paces, have shown great mildness and moderation while he head, and leaned his elbow on his other hand—thus. at all unfrequent for the poor people in this country to or so, distant from him. He then put his hand to his to the thousands who, till now, have been totally excluded

from any intercourse with their distant friends. It is not held the difficult and invidious office of Attorney- He seemed for some minutes, but I cannot say how ask for some means of buying a letter out of the post-office,' General, he was charged with being fond of convict- many, absorbed in thought; I might say, in intense which has been waiting there perhaps for weeks. The ing capitally when he became a judge. Whether this thinking; when, suddenly, he sprang forward, and cost of a letter from England or elsewhere (one shilling charge was true or not, I am not able to decide, pulled Mr L by the nose.”

or one and sixpence), from some of the friends of the but I trust that there are few judges of the present Universal laughter followed this testimony, which, labouring classes, has acted as an absolute prohibition of day who can be said with truth to delight in inflicting though checked immediately by the call of silence, all intercourse between them.” An illustration like this capital punishment. But the severest blow to his was renewed, when the judge, casting a satirical is fit to downweigh whole articles in wrong-headed recharacter was inflicted by Churchill in his poem of glance around, observed, in a loud voice, “ The most views, written by gentlemen skilled to “ make the worse the Rosciad—as by

singular result of intense thinking that I ever re- appear the better reason." " A pert, prim prater of the Northern race,

member !" and the corner of his mouth still moved WHAT IS THE PRACTICAL GOOD OF SCIENCE ? Guill in his heart, and famine in his face,"

with internal laughter, even when he had resumed the The common mind is little qualified to trace science to he meant to designate Alexander Wedderburne. I listening attitude of the judge. In the meanwhile, I its results in the promotion of human happiness. In the conclude, that, when Attorney-General, he had been

was delighted to find that a judge could laugh, in direct following case, however, the benefit is so direct, that the concerned in the prosecution of Wilkes, the friend of Little did I then foresee that in after years from that (Dublin), we had an opportunity of seeing and learning contradiction to the old saying “as grave as a judge." simplest may comprehend :

** On the occasion of a recent visit to the metropolis Churchill, and thence the bitter animosity which these lines portray.

period, the same judge would have been led to excite the particulars of one of those extraordinary proofs But whether the poet had as universal a laugh in the Court of Chancery, of of the resources of medical, or rather surgical science, just ground or not for thus attacking Lord Lough- which I was the original cause. Soon after these which, both in these countries and on the continent, have borough, I was particularly desirous to see him when assizes he was made Lord Chancellor, and an appli- of late years surprised and gratified mankind, and whiclı I heard he was come to N— to preside at our cation came before him, in which I was interested. are among the best and noblest triumphs of the art. The assizes, and with Churchill's portrait of him “ in my A little ballad of mine, called “the Orphan Boy,” case to which we refer is that of a child then, and mind's eye,” I eagerly repaired to the Nisi Prius which I had written for one composer, and therefore probably still, in St Vincent's Hospital, Stephen's Green; Court, to compare it with the original. But I saw had made it his sole property, was set to music and and the particulars

, as stated to us by a non-profesneither“ pertness,” “primness,” nor“ famine,” in the published by another; and my friend applied to the sional gentleman, by whom we were accompanied, and face before me. Of what “guilt” might lie in the Chancellor to grant an injunction, to forbid the rival who had taken great interest in the case from the heart of the accused, I could not judge ; but now, when composer from selling what he had set. The counsel commencement, were as follow:-The wretched infant, I daily see that even good men are led by political diffe- for the contending parties had been warm and long in the child of poor parents in the neighbourhood of rences, and their result, personal hatred, to accuse and debate, when the Chancellor, assuming, I doubt not, Cabinteely, was the subject of one of those hideous

malformations with which it occasionally pleases Provilify their fellow creatures, I am inclined to hope the meaning satirical look which I had seen and en

vidence to afflict and disfigure humanity, and which in that the guilt imputed to Lord Loughborough was

joyed on another occasion, begged leave to ask whether the present case was what is usually termed • pig's-face.'

it would not be better, and certainly it would be more In this instance nature had failed to make either a front the creature of the poet's rancorous revenge and his amusing, if each composer was to sing his own song in to the mouth or a bottom to the nose, and in the stead political dislike. However, I soon forgot Churchill's

court ! This proposal excited a general burst of there projected a kind of proboscis or snout, like that of opinion in my eagerness to form my own of the in- laughter ; and as it was deemed an evidence that the a pig, with two teeth pointing outwards from its end. teresting man I came to see ; and I thought his ap- judge was fatigued, it brought the business to a The wretched child, as soon as it was able to make an

speedier decision, which was in favour of my friend, effort to feed itself (for it never sucked), was in the habit *["He was rapidly gaining ground as a junior counsel, when and the injunction was granted.

of thrusting its arm, up to the elbow, into the hideous an accident put a sudden stop to his practice in his native courts. Hle liad gained the canse of a client in opposition to the celebrated

Soon after, Lord Loughborough was created Earl cavity in the lower part of the face, in order to place its Lockhart, when the defeated veteran, unable to conceal his of Rosslyn, but his infirmities increased so rapidly, food within the passage to the stomach. The feelings of chagrin, took occasion from something in the manner of Mr that he died suddenly of apoplexy in 1805, and was aversion with which the miserable creature was regarded

by their neighbours rendered the condition of the unforseverity of the young barrister's reply drew upon him so illiberal buried in St Paul's Cathedral. a rebuke from one of the judges, that he immediately unrobed, As he was supposed by many to have been the tunate parents most wretched, until at length the poor pela bercings to the collecte declared that he would never more author

of the Letters of Junius, no mean opinion could mother, sick of its constant presence and monstrous ap;

pearance, brought it to the hospital, declaring she would field for his professional exertions. He accordingly removed to have been entertained of his abilities, as it was a comLondon, and enrolled himself a member of the Inner Temple."- pliment to the head of any man to be supposed capable hazardous to its life, if there were any chance of render

be quite resigned to the result of any operation, however George III. the courageous advice to call in the troops for the of writing so well, though it was any thing but a comsuppression of the London riots of 1780.-ED.]

pliment to his heart. But I believe there is no te- *[A kind of tablet made by boiling treacle or coarse sugar.)

܀

« ZurückWeiter »